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SAHI 2019 Summer Course Descriptions


Week 1 June 9-14

Art and Design

Design: Think. Know. Do.
Director: William Rowe

This camp will expose you to the power of graphic design in making meaningful differences in our everyday lives, communities and the world. Working in teams, you will design an integrated campaign that allows local restaurant diners to contribute to UNICEF’s clean-water initiative. You will learn a variety of processes and methods, including the design-thinking process. You will be introduced to the field of graphic design and its basic tools, and you will make a presentation of your solution. This camp will also introduce you to a variety of design fields, including education, careers and professional practices.

Astronomy and Physics

Cedar Point Freefall and the Heavens

Directors: Jason Pinkney and David Lusk

During this camp, you will gain fundamental knowledge of the principles of physics and solve problems in the context of using critical thinking and inquiry skills of applied physics. There will be spills, thrills and chills – and that’s just the math and science. This camp closely examines the physics behind the scream machines that make our hearts race and stomachs drop. Classroom projects in engineering and physics will provide the basis for the science behind the thrill rides. The course’s “final exam” is a full day at the world’s biggest physics lab – Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. Through the astronomy segment of the course, significant time will be devoted to exploring the skies by day and by night.

Chemistry and Food

Director: Ron Peterson

Have you wondered how the chemistry that you have learned can be applied to understand cooking and food? Through a combination of laboratory experiments and kitchen procedures, we will investigate some of the cooking reactions that make food more flavorful and measure some of the major components in food. Phase changes will be considered by making candy and ice cream. We will examine the transformation and metabolism of foodstuffs for energy and make other delicious treats. Some procedures will be conducted in a kitchen setting, and some experiments will be conducted in a laboratory.

Forensics/Crime Scene Investigation

The Crime Scene and Evidence

Director: Dennis De Luca

In this basic crime scene investigation course, you’ll be exposed to many aspects of forensic investigation through lectures on forensic theory and practice with hands-on activities, including two or three days spent at ONU’s Forensic Training and Crime Scene House. The main processes will embrace the embodiment of Locard’s principle of transferability as emphasized by Dr. Paul L Kirk. The recognition, collection and preservation of evidence will emphasize the importance of on-site and field presumptive testing and analysis with final laboratory reports and presentations being the end-work product. Your presentations will be assessed, and feedback will be provided prior to the final presentation.

Human Histology and Anatomy - FULL, no longer accepting applications

Exploring Human Anatomy and Histology

Directors: Jacqueline Connour and Amy Aulthouse

The human body is an incredible living machine. Have you ever thought about how different tissues and organs are organized to function? In this course, you will explore the human body by looking at tissues and organ systems using three different approaches in anatomy: gross anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy) and developmental anatomy. Gross anatomy is the “big-picture,” and you will explore this level of anatomy by looking at the organ systems in dissections of preserved mammalian specimens. Through the microscope, you will discover the patters and internal organization of tissues and organs. You will look at many different tissues and organs mounted on microscope slides. The theory and application for histology-slide preparation will be explained, and you will have the opportunity to prepare and stain a histology slide of an organ. To see how organs/systems form and change (develop) over time, you will observe living chicken embryos (a model for the study of animal and human development). Lastly, you will learn about selected diseases and see how the gross anatomy and histology has been altered. Note: Students should be entering the 10th, 11th or 12th grade, and the class size is limited to 14 students per week (no exceptions).

Molecular Ecology

Director: Kenneth Oswald

Molecular ecology uses techniques of modern genetics to answer ecological questions, so you will learn both field and laboratory skills during this course. You will first learn field skills by collecting samples from various organisms from the region. You will then examine variation in these organisms’ DNA using modern molecular genetic techniques, including the extraction of DNA from tissue, gel electrophoresis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses (RFLP). Additionally, you will use culture-based techniques to examine organisms’ bacterial symbionts. We will compare and contrast these traditional microbiology techniques with molecular methodologies to assess bacterial community diversity and richness. By the end of the course, you will use genetics data from the organisms you collected in the field to answer a fundamental ecological question.

Pharmacy

Pharmacy for the Future 
Director: Karen Kier

During the weeklong pharmacy course, you’ll discover the expanding role pharmacists play in improving patient lives. You will gain insight into the various science disciplines involved in the research and development of pharmaceutical products and patient care. This camp will evolve as you first learn the history of pharmacy and then progress through an enriching set of hands-on experiences that will expose you to a vast array of pharmacy disciplines. With the guidance of experienced ONU faculty and health care leaders in the area, you will learn drug modeling, design and development; work in a compounding lab; venture into the field of pharmacy where you will visit multiple pharmacy settings; perform research on drug information; and learn more about the expanding role of pharmacists in patient care, assessment and counseling. Lastly, through hands-on lab and research experiences, you will learn the steps required to manufacture a product and how to counsel patients on the use of medications. All of this will prepare you to present your final project to ONU faculty and your parents. Note: Students should be entering their senior year of high school (class of 2020), and the class size is limited to 20 students per week (no exceptions).

 

Week 2 June 16-21

 

Cryptography

Director: Mihai Caragiu
Cryptography is a key element of the computing environment in the contemporary world, with numerous applications (finance and banking, network security, electronic voting, encrypting music and video files, to name just a few). In this workshop, you will learn the basic techniques of secure communication and acquire a working knowledge of famous cryptographic protocols. You’ll receive the necessary background in number theory (indispensable for a solid knowledge of cryptography) and ample hands-on opportunities for putting your newly acquired knowledge to work with the help of sophisticated computer algebra systems such as MAPLE or MATLAB.

Forensics/Crime Scene Investigation

The Crime Scene and Evidence

Director: Dennis De Luca

In this basic crime scene investigation course, you’ll be exposed to many aspects of forensic investigation through lectures on forensic theory and practice with hands-on activities, including two or three days spent at ONU’s Forensic Training and Crime Scene House. The main processes will embrace the embodiment of Locard’s principle of transferability as emphasized by Dr. Paul L Kirk. The recognition, collection and preservation of evidence will emphasize the importance of on-site and field presumptive testing and analysis with final laboratory reports and presentations being the end-work product. Your presentations will be assessed, and feedback will be provided prior to the final presentation.

Content Creation Bootcamp

Director: Shane Tilton

A common question asked by young media professionals is how to maintain a presence on social media, keep a consistent publishing schedule with original and creative content, and cultivate an online community. This workshop focuses on addressing the issues associated with starting a brand online, creating good content on various social media platforms, and supporting those channels with engaging content that your audience will enjoy and share. We’ll start the week with the planning process; you’ll write an executive summary to help focus your content on one topic. We’ll devote the rest of the time to creating the audio, visual and textual elements that will promote your content on your preferred social media sites. You’ll use Adobe Illustrator, Audition and Premier to create banners, podcasts and online videos. By the end of the week, you’ll have a great portfolio of digital content that you can continue to work on and publish at home.

Serial Killers

Director: Tristin Kilgallon

This course will differentiate between mass murderers, spree killers and serial killers. We will explore the historical origins of the concept of serial killers and the prevalence of serial killers throughout world history. The methods, motives and psychological background of serial killers will be analyzed, with a specific focus on American serial killers. We also will discuss the cultural fascination with serial killers and legal attempts to control the sale of “murderabilia.” (Class enrollment is limited to students entering their junior or senior years.)


Week 3 June 23-28

Forensics Advanced

Forensic Lab Science

Director: Dennis De Luca

Exposure to the major probative areas of forensic science will be emphasized, including fingerprint analysis with latent prints collection and examination, DNA analysis, firearms identification, toxicology, and illicit drug chemistry. There will be less emphasis on the crime scene investigation aspect and greater emphasis on laboratory science, although the ONU Crime Scene House will be utilized for collection of evidence to be analyzed. You’ll write laboratory reports, which will be assessed and given feedback.

Pharmacy

Pharmacy for the Future 
Director: Karen Kier

During the weeklong pharmacy course, you’ll discover the expanding role pharmacists play in improving patient lives. You will gain insight into the various science disciplines involved in the research and development of pharmaceutical products and patient care. This camp will evolve as you first learn the history of pharmacy and then progress through an enriching set of hands-on experiences that will expose you to a vast array of pharmacy disciplines. With the guidance of experienced ONU faculty and health care leaders in the area, you will learn drug modeling, design and development; work in a compounding lab; venture into the field of pharmacy where you will visit multiple pharmacy settings; perform research on drug information; and learn more about the expanding role of pharmacists in patient care, assessment and counseling. Lastly, through hands-on lab and research experiences, you will learn the steps required to manufacture a product and how to counsel patients on the use of medications. All of this will prepare you to present your final project to ONU faculty and your parents. Note: Students should be entering their senior year of high school (class of 2020), and the class size is limited to 20 students per week (no exceptions).

Quantum Physics

A Century Later: Quantum Mechanics and Relativity Theory

Director: Mellita Caragiu

The reason why a “theory of everything” in physics still eludes us is partly due to the difficulties that arise in the unification of quantum mechanics on one hand and the theory of relativity on the other hand. This course will be a self-contained, gentle introduction to both these spectacular theories, initiated at the beginning of the 20th century and which received recent boosts through the detection of gravitational waves and entanglement experiments. 

Theatre

’Round the World of Theatre

Director: Kathe Devault

Do you enjoy participating in theatre and want to take your experience to the next level? Perhaps you want to get involved in theatre for the first time? Either way, we have a terrific experience to offer! Ohio Northern University’s theatre arts and dance faculty presents an introduction to theatre in all its many facets! Not sure what aspect of theatre suits you? We will give you an exciting taste of it all; sessions in acting, dance, scenic painting, lighting design and stage combat will keep you thoroughly engaged. The week will culminate in a field trip to an area professional theatre for a guided tour and a show!