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Dr. Mark E. Olah

Chair, Associate Professor of Pharmacology
Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences
HPPEC 251
525 S. Main Street
Ada, OH 45810
419-772-2287
Professional Experience: 
 
1994 – 1999 Assistant Research Professor, Duke University Medical Center 
1999 – 2005 Assistant Professor, Division of Pharmacology and Cell Biophysics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati 
2005 – 2008, Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, Idaho State University
2008 – Present, Associate Professor, College of Pharmacy, Ohio Northern University
 
Education: 
 
B.S. Pharmacy; Philadelphia College of Pharmacy & Science, 1983
Ph.D. Pharmacology; The Ohio State University, 1988
Post-doctoral: Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center
 
Teaching Interests: 
 
Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Signaling
Cardiovascular Pharmacology
 
Awards: 
 
National Institutes of Health; Epac1 Signaling in Angiogenesis (1 R15 GM84415-01); R15 (AREA) program; Duration of Funding 12/03/2008 – 11/30/2012; Role on Grant: Principal Investigator. 
 
ISU University Research Committee (internal competitive grant); Mechanisms of Endothelial Cell Proliferation During Hypoxia; Spring, 2006; Role on Grant: 
Principal Investigator
 
National Institutes of Health; Adenosine Receptors and Tumor Antiangiogenesis (1 R01CA79531-01); Duration of Funding: 04/01/99 - 02/01/04; Role on grant: Principle Investigator (50% effort)
 
Research Interests: 
 
Endothelial cell signaling in angiogenesis
Molecular pharmacology of adenosine receptors
 
Selected Publications: 
 
Fang, Y. and Olah, M.E. cAMP-dependent, Protein Kinase A-independent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) following adenosine receptor stimulation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells – Role of Epac1. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 322:1189-1200, 2007.
 

Recent Presentations:

Olah, M. and Miller, L. Role of Rac1 in A2B Adenosine Receptor and Epac1 Signaling to Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in Human Endothelial Cells. 
The FASEB Journal 2012; 26:663.1