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Days 9-10

 

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Saturday, July 23 and Sunday, July 24  Week two was a success in the DR, and it took all 46 of our combined efforts to make it so! Nate Hedrick and I (Keira Corbett) are the Northern Without Borders leaders for this week and after leading our respective groups (American Airlines, Delta) into the Dominican, we quickly realized how much lack of sleep effects you when you have the pressure of knowing things will not always go smoothly. We did have our snafus, but each one was resolved quickly and with positive attitudes. Thanks everyone =) Patience is a virtue in the Dominican and learning to be flexible is a must. I would like to give a shout out to Markus for being the calmest person to ever lose a bag out of a pickup truck. This pushed our hotel arrival time back, so we had a good old fashioned American pizza party and relaxed for the week ahead of us. We are trying to enjoy the last warm showers, air conditioning and most likely, the only time we will get eight hours of sleep while we still can.

This year, we have been blessed with the company of several professionals from the States. Medically, we have nurses, pediatricians, pharmacists and oral surgeons. We also have a variety of professors in the fields of nursing, communication, mathematics and engineering. Being able to tailor this experience towards each student’s major is something we are all excited about this year!

Sunday began with a road trip from our hotel in Santo Domingo to the Solid Rock Mission’s guest house in San Juan de la Maguana. Along the way there was a lot to see. We saw the common sights, including the ever-present speed bumps in the barrios (villages) designed to slow us down so locals can sell us their goods. This was our first face-to-face (literally with only a pane of glass in between us) encounter with the locals. In addition to better stop signs —mentioned by previous bloggers— we feel there should be some goat crossing signs. They run out in front of the busses just like the deer back home. While looking out the bus window, some of us were lucky to see a baptism taking place in a river.  

Upon arriving at the guest house we did the usual, ate a delicious lunch and had our unpacking party, counting vitamins and supplies we'll need for the week ahead. Afterwards we went to a church service. The congregation was very welcoming and the music was moving. They attempted to put the English translation up on some screens, but they had some difficulties. The leader said he would be able to provide us all with a translated copy of the transcript. 

Tomorrow is our first clinic day. We can’t wait!!!

—Keira Corbett
Senior, Biology
Tipp City, OH

—Jill Amos
Sophomore, Nursing
Wooster, OH