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Art & Design Alumni News

Alumni News: 2010-11

A “New Mars” Comes to the National Air and Space Museum
By Bruce Campbell is a geologist in the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum

April—The Exploring the Planets Gallery in the National Air and Space Museum’s National Mall Building recently underwent a major update to the section devoted to the scientific exploration of Mars.

This new exhibit features the work of Ohio Northern design graduate Ashley Dally Hornish (BFA ’04). She is a visual information specialist at the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum.

In the Mars exhibit, “I designed all the yellow panels,” explained Ashley. “And, I put together the file to create the big wall mural on the left.”

The exhibit showcases the results of the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Express, and other recent spacecraft that have revolutionized our ideas about the surface, atmosphere, ice deposits, and ancient water on the Red Planet.

Visitors find fantastically detailed images of the surface taken from orbit by the HiRISE camera, a full-scale model of a Mars Exploration Rover, instruments used by the Viking spacecraft to make the first searches for life, views inside the polar caps provided by radar sensors, a watch that runs on “Martian time,” and a chunk of rock that landed in Antarctica after being blasted from the surface of Mars by an impact. The new exhibit puts all this information together to reveal Mars as a complex and still-puzzling world that holds valuable clues to the development of our own planet and those around other stars.

Ashley began her tenure with the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in 2008 as a graphic design intern, designing new graphic panels for the “How Things Fly” exhibit, the Smithsonian’s most popular attraction.

“During my time at ONU, I interned in Washington, DC, through the Washington Center. This great experience is one of the reasons I decided to move to the DC area. I also wanted to attend The George Washington University so I could earn my masters degree in museum studies and exhibition design.”

Ashley, who earned an undergraduate degree in graphic design and a minor in museum studies from Ohio Northern University, completed her graduate work in 2009. She also works part-time as a designer and production assistant at Matt Mendelsohn Photography in Arlington, VA.

To learn more about the Exploring the Planets exhibition, visit the Smithsonian’s website.

The 2010–11 year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second and third editions of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: photo by Mark Avino, Smithsonian Institution

’77 BFA Graduate Featured in PBS Program
Equine Artist Laura Barnhardt Corle
Learn how Laura’s passion for horses inspired her career as an artist.

Originally published on Equitrekking.com, February 14, 2011
By Darley Newman, host and producer of Equitrekking

Darley Newman: Have horses and art always been a passion?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: I actually became an artist because I wanted a horse. In the late ’50s in Lima Ohio, the Meadowgold Dairy still had wagons pulled by horses. I saw that horse as a Firey Steed and was determined to be the Lone Ranger when I grew up, but my parents were unimpressed with the idea of my keeping one in the back yard... so I filled the want by drawing horses – all the time.

By junior high school, in the mid- to late 1960s, a new neighbor—a doctor–moved into the neighborhood and suddenly everyone who had horses in the neighborhood switched to riding English style. Turned out, as a young man, Dr. Schoeniger had ridden in the Spanish Riding School of Vienna.

Suddenly I had Ballet out my window on a daily basis, complete with tall boots and riding pants. It drove me nuts to just watch, so I drew even more to fill the need.

Dr. Schoeniger’s kids told me about a wonderful lady, who was such a wonderful instructor. Their father, in my view, as a rider in the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, was an Olympic level rider—and he chose her to be his children's instructor. I wanted lessons from her!! Yet again—my parents made me wait.

It bugged me, naturally. But in the long run it was a bonus because with all that drawing I developed further skills as an artist –all because I had wanted something else. I had wanted a horse. Now, I love being an artist – and now, as an adult, I also get to ride—and wonder of wonders—with the same instructor that taught the Schoeniger children in the ’60s.

It turns out that the more you do something, the better you get at it, and apparently, I drew a LOT.

By high school it was natural to be in Art. But later, as a parent, I made sure my daughter got to ride. And finally I couldn't stand just watching her ride and traded watercolor classes for riding lessons with Jean Hanson, the very same lady I heard of as a child from the Schoeniger’s. Amazingly, in her late 70s, she still taught!

If I ever learn just an ounce of what Jean holds in her little finger—then I will have accomplished something.

Darley Newman: Where do you find inspiration for your work?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: Everywhere. Just a blank piece of d’Arches 300 lb. weight hot press watercolor paper is inspiring! But, of course, a primary inspiration is that interest in horses, which never left me, and it has offshoots.

I see barns as interesting. They’re like churches inside. They rise up and are solid and strong. They have a quiet ancient dignity and a history that tells of the passage of time.

But the barns are aging and disappearing, so farmers don’t store loose hay in lofts anymore. Hay is baled and stacked—the bales too heavy for a loft. So I look at a barn and paint the details that will be lost.

People inspire me too. The same way I was inspired as a kid by watching friends ride past my house, I’m inspired as an adult by my friend Jean, now in her 80s and continuing to give lessons. I unabashedly want to be her when I grow up!

Darley Newman: There’s a lot of detail in your photo-realistic watercolor style. Does that make it more difficult? What are some challenges that you face painting horses?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: I don’t know if it’s actually more difficult to be so detailed, because, to me, detail is very much the fun part, but it’s definitely more time consuming.

I may spend around 80 or 90 hours on one painting. I’ll take photos with my camera or cell phone, which allows me later to work indoors where the lighting doesn’t change, and where it’s never too cold or hot for me to feel the brush.

And because I can work later, and indoors, farmers don’t wonder what I’m doing, why I’m painting it THAT color or try to fix things like they do when I paint on site. Because I paint photo-realistically, a farmer down the road may recognize that Bill’s barn needs mending.

Even so, even taking photos, I’ve noticed that they must call each other up like a prayer chain because by the time I’m taking photos at the 3rd or 4th barn, they’re out fixing the things I had felt were dignified and appealing.

One other thing. A photo is also a useful tool for me in recording detail that moves too quickly, in the case of an animal like a horse…who often has a different opinion of “holding still”.

Darley Newman: Your work “The Cribber” is familiar to many of us horse lovers. Is that a horse at your stables? What’s the story? She has a cute, yet mischievous look in her eyes.

Laura Barnhardt Corle:  I was at an art fair at the county fairgrounds near Marietta Ohio and had been hearing horses whinnying. I took an art fair break, and explored the horse barns. I found this weanling. Her mother was in a neighboring barn, and they must have been recently separated because there was this conversation going back and forth between them. At any rate, this foal was definitely doing her very best to be appealing.

Darley Newman: Why is “Belgian Emergence” purposefully unfinished?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: When I started this painting, I had every intention of finishing it. It’s of two big Draft horses – Belgians- that have feet the size of pie plates, and they were both mares in foal.

The mare on the left had just scratched her chin with her hind hoof and turned to look at me. She was fairly relaxed and content and her ears were at ease.

The other mare was more than a bit huffy with her ears laced back. There was a point at which the painting was becoming excruciating, because I was painting all those tiny little hairs in the grain of her coat along the contour of her body as the light caught them, and found myself holding my breath!

So I set the painting aside to breathe a bit, but quickly discovered that protecting it from an unexpected splash of yellow ochre was a good idea; and the safest place for art is on the wall. While doing other things I still thought about those girls and looking at them, I realized that the whole painting would be brown.

I also realized that I liked seeing how much drawing is underneath a painting. Both mares are in foal.

One’s content-almost smug, but the other seems huffy. Were her ears laced back because she’s not done yet, or because she’s stuck in foal forever? It seemed much more fitting to the story to leave them as they were.

Darley Newman:  What is your advice to our readers who may want to pursue art as their career?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: Best thing to tell someone who wants to pursue art as a career is to be diligent.

You have to have a fire in your belly and really want It! I’ve read that 10% of those who study art never make a living doing what they were trained to do.

I recommend making yourself employable in your field so you can be self- sustaining in your craft. Cover your basis and get a degree in your field. This polishes your ability and readies you for whatever market you are in, so that your art can support both itself and you.

I have my Bachelor’s in Fine Arts degree from Ohio Northern University-- best thing I ever did. If I were to do it again, I’d also have my Master’s.

You don’t know what life is going to dish out, so cover your bases in such a way that in a fluctuating economy you can do what you are compelled and feel called to do. 

I am fortunate. I teach and have a studio to work in where there are other artists. Having that contact with other artists is invaluable. Their critiques and comments are invaluable, and the spontaneous feedback inspires even more creativity.

Darley Newman: What would you tell readers who long to be around horses, but like you, may have to wait a while and work hard to make it happen?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: Sometimes you have to be creative in ways you didn’t expect. Life didn’t take me in a direction that got me near horses for a long, long time. But when my daughter wanted lessons, I couldn’t stand not riding any longer, and I began by trading watercolors classes for riding lessons.

There are lots of things barn managers are willing to be helped out with and what they give you to do may even turn out to be the beginning of lessons. Picking out burrs from a mane or picking hooves…there may even be a shovel involved. Granted, I was in my 40’s when I finally was able to get close to horses. That was probably excessive patience on my part. If it’s your dream, don’t let yourself be deferred!!

Darley Newman: How are horses therapy for you?

Laura Barnhardt Corle: Will Rogers said “The outside of a horse is good for the Inside of a Man.” I think it’s something about that partnership that feeds your soul.

To some of us the aromatherapy of a horse is sweet perfume.

I always felt that way, but as an adult I find myself with Multiple Sclerosis. Now, I could have gone to “Horses for the Handicapped” but never did, because I had a chance to do what I wanted all my life and to learn dressage patterns, right hand canter leads, counter canters, crossovers and side passes. I have MS, not a handicap. And yes, riding helps me, but I don’t know if it’s fulfillment of that long-time desire, or the movement of a horse’s body under my English saddle that does it.

Right now it’s cold in Ohio and my instructor has gone to Arizona for the winter. That's my seasonal deprivation, not lack of sunlight. As far as MS goes, it’s an inconvenience and I’m actually quite very lucky.

Perhaps this is why I’m fierce about telling people who want to get into art that you have to really want it. You never know what will happen in life. It’s like insurance. You plan and cover your bases.

If you want something badly enough, you’ll find an avenue to make it work. I have MS, yet my studio is a 2nd floor walk-up, and to set up my booth for an art fair I have boxes that weigh about 150 lb. a tent and wall panels.

Exercise is good for you, and that’ll help me get to the barn later. When you are an artist, you worked hard to get there but people don’t expect all that work behind it, so I was never deterred by doing things people didn’t think I could do... like being too old to ride.

I have a friend with pancreatic cancer and another with GIST, a difficult and rare chemo-resistant cancer, and I have yet another student who has Parkinson’s, who comes up those tall 28 steps to reach my studio for her classes. My riding instructor is in her 80s…They’ve all inspired the dickens out of me.

I’m not going to let myself miss out on riding. It’s good for my Soul!

Laura Barnhardt Corle is currently an adjunct instructor of art at Ohio Northern University where she teaches art appreciation. She is also a freelance artist and teacher in the Findlay area, offering eight-week watercolor classes at her studio. Laura exhibits locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows, and she has participated in many regional art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

In 2010, Laura was honored when three pieces were accepted into the Community Gallery of the Toledo Museum of Art, a world class museum, for the Findlay Area Artist Exhibit, and was also honored by having a watercolor accepted in the 92 Annual Toledo Area Artists Exhibit.

See Laura's watercolors at Ohio Northern University during "Celebrating 50 Years of the Art Major" from March 18 and to April 17th 2011, with the Artist's Reception March 20. The hours are noon until 5 daily. The show that celebrates the 50th year of the Art Major at Ohio Northern University. Laura was the first to graduate with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree with a specialty in Painting, specifically, Watercolors.

Learn more about Laura and see more of her work at photorealisticwatercolors.com.

Darley Newman is a travel expert, published author and Emmy nominated host and producer of Equitrekking, the Emmy Award-winning lifestyle television series that takes viewers on global travel adventures to experience culture, cuisine, history and adventure. Darley and local guides discover the best of each destination as they ride horses and camels, hike, snorkel and sightsee in stunning landscapes, capturing the world’s most beautiful locations and interesting experiences in high definition.

Equitrekking is the Emmy Award-Winning Public Television travel series that takes viewers horseback riding around the world with local people to experience history, culture, nature and adventure. Hosted by Darley Newman, Equitrekking is distributed in high definition to PBS stations in North America through APT (American Public Television), the Public Television lifestyle channel, Create TV, and on international networks in over 65 countries including Italy, Turkey, France, Japan and Russia. 

Equitrekking's companion website, Equitrekking.com, is a one-stop site for equestrian travel featuring video clips, the Equitrekking Vacation Guide, expert tips, travel articles, Darley’s blog, photos and a monthly e-newsletter. The Equitrekking Vacation Guide has been featured in the Chicago Tribune and showcases great equestrian vacation destinations including dude and guest ranches, horse safaris, pack trips, equestrian resorts and horse holiday destinations around the world.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second and third editions of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

Ohio Northern Alumna Makes Chocolates for Adventurous Tastes
“Latitude: Art & Design @ 50” Alumna Feature

by Tim Steury, Washington State University

Like May Lillie, Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72) came West from Pennsylvania—both, I’d venture to say, for love. May Lillie, née Mary Manning, was an otherwise good Quaker girl who fell for Gordon William Lillie, the Pawnee Bill of Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show, when he brought the show to Philadelphia toward the end of the 19th century. After May and Bill wrote each other for a year, she followed him back to Oklahoma to ride horses and become a sharpshooter.

Lysohir followed her love of art even farther west. [After receiving her BA degree from Ohio Northern], she got her MFA [from Washington State University], married Ross Coates, became a successful sculptor—and then she re-discovered chocolate. Now May Lillie stares determinedly down the barrel of her six-shooter as the logo for Lysohir’s Cowgirl Chocolates.

“You have to have an adventurous spirit to try a Cowgirl Chocolate,” says Lysohir, in her new shop in Moscow, Idaho, having just moved the business out of her home and studio. She sets a bowl of chocolates down beside me.

Although the spice of adventure came later, Lysohir and chocolate go way back. She started working for a local chocolate factory when still in high school and on into college. Where chocolate and sculpture first came together was when the owner asked her to sculpt a four-foot chocolate bunny for an Easter display.

“It just got away from me,” she says. “Oh, Pete, how wide are your doors?” she asked her boss after she’d finished—a question she would find herself asking again later in life as she planned her monumental ceramic sculptures.

Thousands of people came to see her eight-foot chocolate bunny. Her turtles and rhinoceroses, too.

But let’s focus for a moment on these truffles before me. At the very first bite, they’re awfully good, but not that different. Made of fine European chocolate, they are sweet and dark and so delicious. And then the cayenne kicks in.

“They’re different,” she says, smiling, “they’re rugged, they’re not your normal truffle.”

The pepper lingers with the chocolate in the throat. It’s quite wonderful. And of course, if the idea surprises at first, it is not exactly new. Think of Mexican mole.

As the spice lingers and you get your bearings in Lysohir’s Cowgirl world, you realize that where Business begins and art leaves off is not exactly clear. Consider, for example, that in the beginning it was sales of her art that supported her chocolate adventure.

“It was hard,” she says, telling of her struggle to cover her expenses.

But then the Food Channel discovered Cowgirl Chocolates. The response crashed Moscow’s Internet connection to the outside, non-Cowgirl world.

“Now this,” she says, “takes care of the art.”

There is no romantic regret in her observation, no longing for a more innocent art/commerce balance. Indeed her art still resides in a number of galleries, in Seattle, Ketchum, Boise.

“Chocolates sell faster,” she says. “But when you sell one $10,000 piece of art, it takes care of you for a while.”

In fact, though, she doesn’t really separate the two. Think of Cowgirl Chocolates as performance art, if you will. And it all, somehow, converges as personal history.

For example, consider her installation Bad Manners, a portion of which sits next to us as we talk and eat her spicy chocolates. Amidst the ceramic representations of various foods mingle, of course, ceramic chocolates.

“My art really is an extension of my history, my belief system, my value system, that I got growing up, from my parents, my aunts and uncles, my teachers.”

At times that extension is very personal. A collection of life-size bronze bear heads—one of which guards Jim Kolva’s loft—a large bronze bear, now in Boise, and steel flowers, which she calls The Last Immigrant, commemorates her Ukrainian grandmother, who died at age 99.

Consider also The Dark Side of Dazzle, which includes a 24-foot-long ceramic battleship, which started with the fact that her father survived World War II. Currently, she is creating ceramic busts, based on their senior portraits in the high school yearbook, of each one of the 167 girls she graduated with in 1968.

“I’m on my 50th-something now,” she says.

Meanwhile, I try the various flavors Lysohir sets before me, including a couple of new ones from the mild-mannered, non-spicy “colts and fillies” line. Raspberry lemonade. And sarsaparilla? Yes. It’s milk chocolate, though. It didn’t work with the dark chocolate.

“It’s a very American flavor,” she says.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second and third editions of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

Call for Entries
In May 1961, ONU’s first student graduated with a major in art. Fifty years later, the department of art & design has grown to four major programs with over 250 alumni.

In recognition of this milestone, alumni are invited to submit artwork for a postage stamp design. General guidelines include original art; a square format (no larger than 8x8 inches); any media (two-dimensional only); and must reflect a theme of the visual arts at Ohio Northern.

When submitting art for consideration, please include a short description of the concept. Also on a separate sheet of paper, please supply contact information for the artist. Send all completed documentation to Ohio Northern University, Department of Art & Design, c/o Prof. Brit Rowe, 525 S. Main Street, Ada, Ohio 45810.

One winning artwork will be selected on the basis of concept and design by a panel of ONU faculty and students. Other submitted artwork will be on display in the Wilson Art Center during the 50th anniversary celebration.

Deadline for consideration is September 27, 2010.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second and third editions of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

Alumni and Students Invited To Share Historical Artifacts
July
—The department of art & design at Ohio Northern University will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2011 of the art major with “Latitude: Art & Design @ 50,” a yearlong series of exhibitions, lectures and special events.

The department’s roots stretch back to 1878, largely as an outgrowth of course work in drawing for education, engineering and architecture students. In the 1880s, Professor W.A. Smith taught sketching from nature, oil painting, and crayon painting, in addition to classes in mechanical engineering and architectural drawing. Originally designated as an independent academic unit at Ohio Northern, the department’s name was changed to the College of Fine Arts in 1903. In 1907 as the University’s curriculum and enrollment grew, the name was changed to the School of Fine Art. When the program merged with the College of Liberal Arts in 1929, the name was changed to the department of art. And then in 2008, the name was changed again to reflect expanding educational opportunities for students.

“Academic anniversaries are unique opportunities to reflect on and celebrate past achievements, and to speculate and prepare for future possibilities,” said department chair and alumnus Prof. Brit Rowe, a graphic designer who has led the department since 2002.

Alumni are invited to share stories, articles, documents, artwork, posters, photographs, t-shirts or any other artifacts in the planning for the 50th anniversary celebration. Alumni willing to submit materials should contact Prof. Brit Rowe by email (art@onu.edu) or by mail (Wilson Art Center, 525 S. Main St., Ada, Ohio 45810). If requested, all personal materials can be returned.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second and third editions of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

Ohio Northern Graduate Gains International Attention
July
—Comic-Con International, held this past July, is the largest comic book and popular arts conventions in the world. In addition to this highly publicized event, Comicdom Con Athens, another international convention for comic book fans, convened in Athens, Greece as a prelude to the United States spectacle.

Comicdom Con Athens is an annual comics festival, organized by the non-profit organization Comicdom Press and the Hellenic-American Union. In this conference, the audience is introduced to interesting art forms, famous guests, original art exhibitions, sketch events, panels, documentaries, movies, workshops on comics and related arts, panel discussions, publisher spotlights and much more.

Among the guests this year was Ohio Northern’s own, Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93).

Kyle attended Comicdom Con Athens 2010 courtesy of Jemma Press. The publishing company released a Greek edition of Mosaic, one of Kyle’s creations, with an all new cover collaboration by Kyle and Tattoo artist David Boltt. Jemma Press will also be releasing the Greek edition of Hotz’s favorite work, the award-winning Billy the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities.

Kyle, most often associated with dark moody comics, has been a designer, a penciler, an inker and a writer for over 15 years. He’s developed his reputation for horror books working on characters such as Carnage, The Hood, and Cal MacDonald.

He has collaborated with publishers Dark Horse, Image, DC, Chaos, Scholastic, and Marvel, showing a variety of stylistic styles and approaches, ranging from dreadful and serious to frenetic comedy. One of his most impressive design work is the personal project, Mosaic, which Tim Bradstreet praised by saying “Mosaic will hit you like a freight train.”

Kyle also co-created Billy the Kid with Eric Powell (The Goon) and the book received an ‘A’ rating from Entertainment Weekly, which said the book was the best historical comic since League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Hotz and Powell are now hard at work on the sequel to Billy the Kid, to be published this summer by Dark Horse.

The Hood was also co-created by Kyle for Marvel. The Hood, since his introduction many years ago, has gone on to become one of the most popular villains of the Marvel universe—to the point where Kyle was asked to return to the character for a sequel last summer.

He has worked on a wide variety of books, including Night Man, Lord Pumpkin, Rune and Curse of Rune for Malibu; Criminal Macabre, The Goon and Billy the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities for Dark Horse; Epilogue for IDW; The Agency for Top Cow; and Venom, Dr. Strange, Carnage, Green Goblin, The Hood, Wraith, The Hulk, Black Panther, Captain Marvel, Agent X, Zombie, Simon Garth: The Zombie, and others for Marvel.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bachelor of Arts degree in art at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

Ohio Northern Alumna and Instructor Accepted to 92nd Annual Exhibit in Toledo
July—Ohio Northern graduate Laura Barnhardt Corle (BFA ’77), and a part-time instructor in art, has been accepted to the 92nd Toledo Area Artists' Exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art.

The juried exhibition opened July 9 and continues through Aug. 22. Its 103 pieces by 86 artists were selected from a field of 789 entries submitted by regional artists and others who once lived in the area. A total of 281 people entered the contest, competing for $5,800 in prizes.

Dominated by the two-dimensional—painting, prints, photos—the works line the walls and fill some freestanding cases in the long, lower-level hallways known as the Works on Paper Galleries.

Judges for the contest were Kathryn J. Reeves, an art professor at Purdue University, and Kitty McManus Zurko, director-curator of the College of Wooster Art Museum.

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU in 1977, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio. Laura exhibits locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

The Toledo Federation of Art Societies is a non-profit organization made-up of 21 art and cultural groups working together in and around the city of Toledo, Ohio. For over 90 years, TFAS has partnered with the Toledo Museum of Art to present the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition and has supported local artists through the purchase of artworks form these exhibitions. TFAS has established and maintains a permanent collection of regional artwork that is available as an educational resource through a partnership with the Toledo School for the Arts.  Most recently, TFAS has established a tuition scholarship to provide an incentive for the most artistically gifted students to remain in the region.

The Toledo Museum of Art was founded in 1901 and has earned a global reputation for the quality of its collection, its innovative and extensive education programs, and its architecturally significant campus. The Museum’s holdings has more than 30,000 works of art representing American and European painting, the history of art in glass, ancient Greek, Roman, and Egyptian works, Asian and African art, medieval art, sculpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, and modern and contemporary art.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the art major at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Done Daylilies Two, watercolor, Laura Barnhardt Corle

Alumnus Wins Award in Annual Juried Exhibit in Wassenberg Show
June—The Wassenberg Art Center in Van Wert, Ohio is known to hold one of northwest Ohio’s best juried art exhibits, with a reputation for high quality and variety of work. This year’s 54th Annual June Art Exhibit only included 50 different artists from around the region including two artists with Ohio Northern connections.

Ohio Northern University alumnus Jaye Bumbaugh (BSEd ’59) and ONU retired ceramics professor Bruce Chesser both had work accepted into the annual juried exhibit.

Jaye also received the Charles F. Wassenberg Award for his ceramic and wood piece “Elf Owl Sleeping in Old Box.”

Jaye is a retired professor in art and chair of the school’s art department. He received his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University in 1959 and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. His work was featured last May in an exhibit during ONU’s Alumni Weekend in celebration of his class’ 50th reunion.

Bruce Chesser, professor emeritus in art, specializes in contemporary interpretations of traditional functional ceramics. He is a retired professor of art at Ohio Northern University where he taught ceramics for over 30 years. He also served as chair of the department of art & design for 12 years. Previously, he taught at Ohio University, Athens. He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in fine arts from OU and has participated in more than 100 juried, invitational and one-person art shows. Prof. Chesser also conducts numerous workshops and lectures on salt-glazing and raku pottery.

The 54th Annual June Art Exhibit featured 102 pieces of work with only 24 artists receiving awards. The show ran through June 25.

The Wassenberg Art Center is located at 643 S. Washington St., Van Wert, Ohio. The Art Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and encouraging the visual arts in the Van Wert, Ohio area. Groups may contact the director to arrange special tours of exhibits. For information on the art center’s activities, contact the Wassenberg Art Center at 419.238.6837 or toll free at 1.888.238.3837.

The 2010–11 academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the art major at Ohio Northern University. Growing from a single-discipline school, the department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts with concentrations in two-dimensions, three-dimensions and art therapy. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is also recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2010-11 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

images: Jaye Bumbaugh’s “Elf Owl Sleeping in Old Box” and the opening reception/award ceremony at the Wassenberg Art Center.

Alumni Weekend Features the Work of ONU Graduate Laurie Godfrey
June—The recent work of Laurie Godfrey (BFA ’05) will be on display at Ohio Northern University’s Elzay Gallery of Art June 4–5. After Alumni Weekend, the exhibit will continue through the month of June by appointment (by calling the Wilson Art Center at 419.772.2160). The exhibition will honor Laurie and the class of 1960 as they celebrate their 50th class reunion. The show is free and open to the public from noon–6p.m.

A reception for Laurie and for the class of 1960 will be held from 5:15p.m. until 6p.m. Friday, June 4 in the Elzay Gallery and the lobby of the Wilson Art Center. Light refreshments will be served.

As a printmaker, photographer and digital media artist from Columbus, Ohio, Laurie's outlook is continually evolving as the nature of print is challenged and redefined by technology. Her digital c-prints are photographic documentations of her explorations with interconnection, systems and metamorphosis.

“It is through personal experiences that I feel events in life are not mere coincidences, but serendipitous in nature,” explains Laurie. “I believe we exist in a system of actions and reactions, interconnected by forces that are beyond our understanding. Through process, my work examines the directional forces that guide our existence, the relationship between internal and external influence, and the by-product of that exchange of energy.”

“In a present moment, the photograph records the events of the past, and implies those to follow,” Laurie continues. “The photograph is an encapsulation of my concept in a single moment, visually conveying the qualities of energy, interconnection, and metamorphosis. The fluid nature of my work expresses a feeling of kinetic energy. This sense of motion suggests the photograph is part of a larger world that exists beyond its boarders, evoking a sense of wonder and mystery. Sculptural forms of color, unique textures, and implied space lends itself to the photograph’s ability to change in perception. One can get lost in the environments that are created, interpreting them in a multitude of ways from microscopic slides of biological matter, to macrocosmic images of the cosmos.”

Laurie earned her Bachelor’s degree in art/graphic design with minors in museum studies and web/multimedia development. She recently earned her MFA degree in printmaking in 2009 from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania located near Erie, PA. Life has come full circle, as Laurie has returned as an Adjunct Instructor in Art at Ohio Northern, teaching illustration and digital photography.

While in graduate school, Laurie worked as Assistant Director for the Egress Press and Research (EPR), a fine art publishing and research component of the Printmaking Area of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania's Art Department. While there, she editioned prints for visiting artists including Tom Huck, Patricia Villalobos Echeverria, Jay Ryan, Diana Sudyka, and Mike Budai. In the fall of 2008, Laurie was invited to present her work and demonstrate the process of photolithography in Costa Rica at the Universidad Nacional Costa Rica and Escuela Casa del Artista.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Blue Torso by Laurie Godfrey

Art Education Graduate Inspires Her Students with “Experience in Art”
June—Abigail Mosbarger (BFA ’07) believes that art can be a transformative experience. For a group of high school students in Texas, the impact of the visual arts may even be inspirational.

From art classes to a final showcase, three major works from Del Valle High School art students are now on display at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Experience in Art measures over 24 feet wide and is a multi-media classroom project made in collaboration with the three art instructors, including Abigail at Del Valle High School.

The artwork mirrors the student’s involvement and feelings towards the art they create in class.

“I think this is the first time we have ever exhibited something as large as this before and certainly the first time a collaborative piece like this displayed in a location as public as the airport,” said art instructor Jenny Parry.

The exhibit features triptychs, a work made of three panels made to look like one. A larger than life hand is joined in the showcase by a vibrantly painted portrait and a terra cotta relief.

“We started with materials and mediums each class was working in (charcoal, paint and ceramics). We provided the guidance and support to the students in order for them to create the murals,” said Parry. “We wanted to show how there was unity among the different disciplines of art and that through collaboration large things can be accomplished.”

With each panel, the instructors provided a small picture that represented a student at work creating art. The students then enlarged the image and transferred it to a four foot by eight foot panel using the media they were learning.

“Each panel has unique embellishments that go beyond the mere act of copying an image,” said Javier Barbosa, painting teacher. “The students expressed themselves with choices of color that were non-traditional and very bold. This project gave the students a chance to experiment with forms of expression they had never encountered.”

“The ceramic media provided the most challenge to render in two-dimension,” said ceramics teacher Abigail Mosbarger, an Ohio Northern alumna. “So the students created terra-cotta plates that fit together like pieces of a puzzle. A photo of a student throwing a clay pot on the potter’s wheel was used as the inspiration and the students made each plate work together as a single image.”

Each panel shows some aspect of a student working with their hand at creating art. Yet the artwork goes beyond the simple representation of making art. Each panel is a swirling mixture of colors and shapes surrounding the hands at work.

“That’s the chaos and distraction so prevalent in high school,” said Abigail. “The students wanted to show how difficult it is to focus on work and how making art helps them to shut out that high school chaos. But even more important is how this project gives the student a chance to step outside of school with something they value very much.”

Experience in Art is on display through the summer at the gallery window behind the Austin Warehouse District Store across from Gate 10 adjacent to screening checkpoint two.

Currently, Abigail teaches art at Del Valle High School located in Austin, Texas. “I primarily teach a class called Art 1,” describes Abigail. “I teach an insane amount of high school students a day—about 200 kids. But I love it. I go to graduate school. I live in a cool city and feel very loved by the people around me.”

Looking back at her years at Ohio Northern, Abigail stated, “I felt very luck to have gone to Ohio Northern. I knew that I wanted to study art and design. I had the passion for educating and teaching children. And along with this passion, I knew that the faculty in the art department possessed that same passion. That was the deciding factor for me to study there.”

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: The high school student’s work at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport and detail of ceramic tiles.