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Research on memory and stress published

Research on memory and stress, conducted by Phillip Zoladz, assistant professor of psychology, and his team, is the basis of two recently published articles.

The first describes a study in which participants were stressed immediately before memory testing, then tested 24 hours following learning. Results showed that stress differentially influenced participants' memory, depending on their corticosteroid response to the stressor.

Reference:
Zoladz, P.R., Kalchik, A.E., Hoffman, M.M., Aufdenkampe, R.L., Burke, H.M., Woelke, S.A., Pisansky, J.M., & Talbot, J.N. (2014). Brief, pre-retrieval stress differentially influences long-term memory depending on sex and corticosteroid response. Brain and Cognition, 85, 277-285.

The second article describes a study in which participants were stressed immediately before learning several lists of words, designed to enable investigators to examine false memory production. The study showed that stress reduced participants' false memories of what they had learned and actually enhanced true memory selectively in females. These findings have implications for how stress affects eyewitness accounts of a stress-inducing event, such as a crime.

Reference:
Zoladz, P.R., Peters, D.M., Kalchik, A.E., Hoffman, M.M., Aufdenkampe, R.L., Woelke, S.A., Wolters, N.E., & Talbot, J.N. (in press). Stress administered immediately before learning reduces false memory production and selectively enhances true memory in females. Physiology & Behavior.

Zoladz’s research team includes David Peters, a senior in pharmacy from Canton, Ohio, Andrea Kalchik, a senior in psychology from Zanesville, Ohio, Mackenzie Hoffman, a 2013 psychology graduate Strongsville, Ohio, Rachael Aufdenkampe, a senior in psychology, from Vermilion, Ohio,  Sarah Woelke, a 2012 psychology graduate from Bowling Green, Ohio, Nicholas Wolters, a senior in pharmacy from Maria Stein, Ohio, Hanna Burke, a psychology major from Findlay, Ohio, Julia Pisansky, a 2013 psychology graduate from Canfield, Ohio, and Jeffery Talbot, former assistant professor of pharmacology.