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Nsia-Pepra’s article examines US increased military involvement in Africa

 Dr. Kofi Nsia-Pepra, assistant professor of political science, is author of an article published in  January-February issue of Military Review, the professional journal of the U.S. Army.

Appearing on pages 50-59, the article is titled, “Militarization of  US Foreign Policy in Africa – Strategic Gain or Backlash?,” and critically examines the U.S. increased military involvement in Africa fueled by  terrorism, need for  energy sources and  to counter creeping China’s influence in Africa.

Nsia-Pepra says, “Other nations conceptualized  these actions as exploitative and imperialistic aimed to control Africa’s energy resources. The U.S. involvement also raised concerns about challenges to sovereignty, welfare and the survival of  the African Union. America’s covert and overt military alliances and joint operations with selected military allies affected spillage, intensity, protractedness and duration of the Congo, Sudan and Darfur conflicts. The U.S. militarization policy has backfired, undermining the attainment of its strategic interests.  To elicit Africa’s support in achieving its interests,  the United States needs to debunk its neorealist  ‘hard power’ policy and adopt  liberal ‘soft power’ policies  such  as  assisting  Africa in its socio-politic economic development.”