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Nsia-Pepra article deals with U.N. peacekeepers

Dr. Kofi Nsia-Pepra, assistant professor of political science, is author of an article appearing in the fall issue of the Peace and Conflict Studies Journal, Vol. 18, No. 2, pages 263-290.

Titled “Robust Peacekeeping? – Panacea for Human Rights Violations,” the paper examines the emerging conviction that United Nations robust peacekeeping, that is a strong and forceful peacekeeping force, works better than the U.N.’s traditional peacekeeping mechanism in reducing human rights violation, specifically, civilian killing, in areas of deployment. Using both negative binomial and logit regression statistical models, the paper finds that United Nations robust peacekeeping lowers civilian killings. Mission size is also associated with lower numbers of civilian killings. Great power participation, peacekeeper diversity and affinity with the host state, along with identity conflicts and at least proto-democratic status of the host state appear to be harbingers of potentially higher deliberate civilian killing totals. The findings have both theoretical and policy implications in the field of peacekeeping.