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The Effect of Humor and Celebrity Endorsement on Attitude toward an Advertisement and Purchase Intent

Year: 
2009
Researcher(s): 
Delaney Banas, Warren Burless, Jacki Hillis, Lynn Stockwell and Kristie E. Payment
Institution: 
Ohio Northern University
Discipline: 
Psychology

This 2 x 2 between-subjects design investigated the effectiveness of both humor and celebrity endorsement presence in print advertisements. Eighty five undergraduate college students were distributed simulated magazines that contained two articles and two print advertisements.  While one print advertisement acted as a distracter, in the other, type of endorser (celebrity or non-celebrity) and type of ad (humorous or non-humorous) were manipulated.  After the participants were given time to view the articles and print advertisements, they answered a questionnaire that contained 7-point scales that measured attitude towards the advertisement and purchase intent.  Attitude towards the print advertisement was based on two different scales, one measuring whether the participants found the advertisement likable or dislikable and the other measuring whether the participants found the advertisement interesting or not interesting.  It was hypothesized that the advertisement containing both humor and celebrity endorsement would produce the highest rating on all three scales. The results indicated that there was a significant main effect for celebrity endorsement for attitude towards the print advertisement, yet there was no significant main effect for celebrity endorsement for purchase intent.  The results showed no significant effect of an interaction between celebrity endorsement and humor and showed no significant main effect of the presence of humor.

Ohio Psychological Association conference
Department: 
Psychology and Sociology