Skip To Main Content

ONU Law's International Week

The Ohio Northern University International Law Society will conduct a week of activities focused on “Cambodia and Human Rights” beginning Monday, Oct. 19.

Monday, Oct. 19
"Cambodia 1979: The World's First Genocide Trial"
Featuring guest speaker John Quigley

Oct. 19-23
SILENT AUCTION
Featuring 10+ pieces of art in various sizes. All proceeds will go to Phare Ponleu Selpak, a school in Cambodia that educates Cambodian street children with an emphasis on art.

The week will kick off with “Cambodia 1979: The World’s First Genocide Trial,” a presentation by guest speaker John Quigley, President’s Club professor emeritus of law at Ohio State University, in the Celebrezze Moot Court Room on Monday, Oct. 19, at 5 p.m.

Before joining the Ohio State faculty in 1969, Quigley was a research scholar at Moscow State University and a research associate in comparative law at Harvard Law School. Quigley teaches International Law and Comparative Law, and he holds an adjunct appointment in the Political Science Department. In 1982-83, he was a visiting professor at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. He is active in international human rights work, and his numerous publications include books and articles on human rights, the United Nations, war and peace, east European law, African law, and the Arab-Israeli conflict in 1995. He was recipient of the Ohio State University Distinguished Scholar Award and formerly held the title of President’s Club professor of law.

The week also includes a silent auction featuring 10-plus pieces of Cambodian art in various sizes. All proceeds will go to Phare Ponleu Selpak, a school in Cambodia that educates Cambodian street children with an emphasis on art. The art will be on exhibit in the law buildings’ Clemens Lounge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. beginning Oct. 19. The auction ends Friday at 1 p.m.

Hope and Sorrow
in Southeast Asia

Shortly after the Vietnam War, from 1975 to 1979, the Khmer Rouge regime (led by Pol Pot) carried out genocide in Cambodia. It is estimated that up to 3 million people were killed due to forced labor, torture, mass execution and malnutrition. Up to 20,000 mass graves, known as the Killing Fields, have been uncovered.

For the past two years, rather than sitting in the classroom to learn about the Cambodian Genocide, ONU law students have traveled to the source, visiting the places where it happened, talking to the people it still affects to this day. Continue reading...