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H1N1 Public Health Campaign

A public health campaign for H1H1 (swine flu) at Ohio Northern University has been organized by Dr. North's Health Communication Class.  For the rest of the quarter, this blog will be updated with new information regarding H1N1 so check back for updates!  You can also follow our campaign through our Facebook group here.  You can follow our campaign and other ONU news on Twitter here.

Fact of the Day: Monday, October 19

What is 2009 H1N1 (swine flu)?

2009 H1N1 (sometimes called “swine flu”) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States in April 2009. This virus is spreading from person-to-person worldwide, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread. On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) signaled that a pandemic of 2009 H1N1 flu was underway.  The classical swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isolated from a pig in 1930.

 

Why is 2009 H1N1 virus sometimes called “swine flu”?
This virus was originally referred to as “swine flu” because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs (swine) in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and bird (avian) genes and human genes. Scientists call this a "quadruple reassortant" virus.