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Areas of Study

The mission of the Department of Psychology, Sociology and Crimi­nal Justice is to provide students with an intellectual foundation in the theories that explain human behavior under both normal and abnormal conditions and clarify how pre-existing patterns of behavior shape hu­man interaction. Students are taught to critically evaluate, theoretically analyze, and scientifically produce research findings about everyday life and to translate the knowledge they have gained from courses through the application of these skills.

Major and Minor Course Requirements: All required courses, both within and outside of the major or minor subject area, must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or higher

Psychology

Psychology Major (39-42 credit hours)

Psychology majors must complete one of three concentrations: behavioral neuroscience, clinical and counseling psychology or general psychology. Each concentration has been designed to prepare students for graduate study in general psychology or specific subfields within the discipline. The 39-42 credit hours listed above includes 16 credit hours of common courses plus 25 credit hours for the behavioral neuroscience concentration, 26 credit hours for the clinical and counseling psychology concentration and 23 credit hours for the general psychology concentration.

  • PSYC 1001    Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 2401    Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (3)
  • PSYC 3401    Experimental Psychology with Lab (4)
  • PSYC 4951    Senior Capstone in Psychology I (1)
  • PSYC 4961    Senior Capstone in Psychology II (1)

Other required courses

  • BIOL 1201     Introductory Biology (4)

Behavioral Neuroscience Concentration (25 credit hours)

The behavioral neuroscience concentration is designed to prepare students for graduate study in physiological psychology, behavioral neuroscience or neuropsychology.

  • PSYC 3151    Learning and Behavior with Lab (4)
  • PSYC 3251    Cognitive Psychology with Lab (4)
  • PSYC 3301    Sensation and Perception with Lab (4)
  • PSYC 3351    Physiological Psychology with Lab (4)
  • PSYC 4351    Psychopharmacology (3)

Complete at least one elective from each of the following two categories:

  • Developmental Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 21611    Child Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 21711    Adolescent Psychology (3)
       
  • Clinical and Social Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3011    Social Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 3111    Psychology of Personality (3)
    • PSYC 4201    Abnormal Psychology (3)

Clinical and Counseling Psychology Concentration (26 credit hours)

The clinical and counseling psychology concentration is designed to prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce or graduate study in clinical or counseling psychology.

  • PSYC 2301    Introduction to Counseling (3)
  • PSYC 3111    Psychology of Personality (3)
  • PSYC 3121    Psychological Assessment (3)
  • PSYC 4201    Abnormal Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 4351    Psychopharmacology (3)

Complete at least one elective from each of the following three categories:

  • Physiological Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3301    Sensation and Perception with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3351    Physiological Psychology with Lab (4)
  • Cognitive Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3151    Learning and Behavior with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3251    Cognitive Psychology with Lab (4)
  • Developmental Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 21611    Child Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 21711    Adolescent Psychology (3)

General Psychology Concentration (23 credit hours)

The general psychology concentration is designed to prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce or graduate study in most subdisciplines of experimental psychology.

  • PSYCH 2xx1-4xx12    Psychology elective (3)
  • PSYCH 2xx1-4xx12    Psychology elective (3)
  • PSYCH 2xx1-4xx12    Psychology elective (3)

Complete at least one elective from each of the following four categories: (14)

  • Physiological Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3301    Sensation and Perception with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3351    Physiological Psychology with Lab (4)
  • Developmental Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 21611    Child Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 21711    Adolescent Psychology (3)
  • Clinical and Social Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3011    Social Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 3111    Psychology of Personality (3)
    • PSYC 4201    Abnormal Psychology (3)

Psychology Minor (19 credit hours)

  • PSYC 1001    Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 2xx1-4xx12    Psychology electives (3)
  • PSYC 2xx1-4xx12    Psychology electives (3)

Complete at least one elective from each of the following three categories:

  • Cognitive and Physiological Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3151    Learning and Behavior with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3251    Cognitive Psychology with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3301    Sensation and Perception with Lab (4)
    • PSYC 3351    Physiological Psychology with Lab (4)
  • Developmental Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 2161    Child Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 2171    Adolescent Psychology (3)
  • Clinical and Social Aspects of Psychology:
    • PSYC 3011    Social Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 3111    Psychology of Personality (3)
    • PSYC 4201    Abnormal Psychology (3)

Notes:

  1. Development across the Lifespan (PSYC 2151) is designed for non-psychology majors. Psychology majors who are interested in developmental psychology should take courses within the developmental sequence (PSYC 2161, PSYC 2171). Students taking PSYC 2151 should not take PSYC 2161 or PSYC 2171 and vice-versa.
  2. Students may take an unlimited number of PSYC 4261 and 4271 credits. However, a maximum of 3 of these credits may be used as the equivalent of a psychology elective and only 9 credits from these courses can be applied toward graduation.
  3. Students may take an unlimited number of SOC 4811, 4881, 4891 and 4981 credits. However, a maximum of 3 of these credits may be used as the equivalent of a sociology elective, and only 9 credits from these courses can be applied toward graduation.
  4. The capstone requirement will be filled by work done in the SOC 4461 and 4471 courses.

Subject Courses - Psychology (PSYC)

1001 - Psychology
3 Credits
Introduction to the scientific approach to understanding human behavior and mental processes. Topics may include human development, learning and memory, personality, social and environmental factors, biological aspects of behavior, the experience of emotion and psychological disorders. Offered fall and spring semesters.

2101 - Motivation and Emotion
3 Credits
Examination of how motivational factors, including emotion, affect the behavior of human and non-human organisms. Theoretical and empirical evidence addressing the biological, behavioral and mental events that trigger and direct behavior will be covered. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2151 - Development across the Lifespan
3 Credits
Basic theories in human development from conception through old age using a biopsychosocial model; contemporary research at each age level. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2161 - Child Psychology
3 Credits
Survey of the basic theories and research relative to human growth and development from conception through late childhood with an emphasis on the physiological, cognitive, socioemotional and cultural changes associated with human life. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2171 - Adolescent Psychology
3 Credits
Survey of the basic theories and research relative to human growth and development from preadolescence through young adulthood with an emphasis on the physiological, cognitive, socioemotional and cultural changes associated with human life. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2201 - Health Psychology
3 Credits
Examination health using a bio-psycho-social model and investigation of the relation between psychology, health-promoting behaviors, wellness, sickness, and the health care system. Offered alternate spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2261 - Human Sexual Behavior
3 Credits
Use of research literature in an attempt to provide an understanding of what is known (as well as what is not known) about the major facets of human sexual behavior. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C)

2301 - Introduction to Counseling
3 Credits
Discusses the basic skills involved in the counseling relationship, including attending, client observation, paraphrasing, summarization, confrontation, and reflection of feeling; explores basic skills and emphasizes skill development as well as counseling theory. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2401 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
3 Credits
Provides an introduction to statistical methods in the behavioral sciences and stresses understanding when and why certain statistical procedures are used. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, hypothesis testing, t-tests, analysis of variance, and chi square. This course may be used to fulfill a math/stat distributional requirement. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C) or PSYC 100 Minimum Grade of C). Must be enrolled in one of the following Major fields of study: Psychology.

2901 - Special Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of special topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

2921 - Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

3011 - Social Psychology
3 Credits
The effects of social and cultural forces upon the individual. The nature and development of attitudes, languages, cognitive processes. Individual and group projects illustrative of the methodology of social psychology. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3111 - Psychology of Personality
3 Credits
The major theories of personality from Freud to contemporary theoretical approaches. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3121 - Psychological Assessment
3 Credits
Psychological measurement and evaluation in the areas of intelligence tests, tests of separate abilities, and personality inventories. Experience will be gained in test administration, scoring and interpretation. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3151 - Learning and Behavior with Lab
4 Credits
The major theories and empirical issues related to common forms of learning, such as classical and instrumental conditioning. Current research in learning is covered on both the human and non-human animal level. Laboratory component involves application of learning principles to modify the behavior of organisms. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3201 - Psychology and the Law
3 Credits
A review of the role of the psychologist in civil commitment procedures, the insanity defense, patient’s rights, the determination of competency and testifying as an expert witness. An examination of significant course cases involving psychology and the law, research in the areas of jury selection, eye witness testimony and psychologists’ licensing procedures. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3211 - Psychology of the Criminal Mind
3 Credits
Focus on forensic psychology utilizing criminal justice and psychological theoretical approaches. Specific attention is paid to the processes of identifying personality traits, behavioral tendencies, geographical location and demographic variables of an offender based on characteristics of a crime. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3251 - Cognitive Psychology with Lab
4 Credits
An introduction to the complex system of mental abilities. Theoretical and empirical approaches to the role of pattern recognition, attention, memory, problem-solving and decision making in human thinking will be explored. Laboratory component involves participation in experiments designed to facilitate student understanding of cognition phenomena. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3301 - Sensation and Perception with Lab
4 Credits
Biological and psychological mechanisms responsible for internalizing the external world. In-depth discussion of the relationship between physical and psychological events based on theoretical and empirical evidence. Laboratory component will use laboratory techniques to illustrate the biological and psychological mechanisms underlying sensation and perception. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3351 - Physiological Psychology with Lab
4 Credits
Psychology as a biological science. Physiological events underlying behavior, including sensory, neural, and glandular involvement in such topics as motivation, emotion, and learning. Laboratory component involves dissections and experiments used to illustrate the role of biological processes in behavior. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C and BIOL 1311 Minimum Grade of C).

3401 - Experimental Psychology with Lab
4 Credits
The logic of experimental research and the application of the methods of science to the study of behavior. Particular emphasis on framing empirically testable hypotheses, experimental design, and analysis of data. Extensive instruction in scientific communication and the APA Publications Manual. Laboratory component involves use of computer simulation and research experience to facilitate student understanding of the processes involved in empirical psychological investigations. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C and PSYC 2401 Minimum Grade of C).

3901 - Special Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of special topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

3921 - Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters.Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

4201 - Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits
The development of a scientific approach to abnormal behavior. A review of the psychological, sociological, and biological factors related to the development of abnormal behavior. A review of the research of, the causal factors related to, and the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders and mental retardation. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

4261 - Internship Practicum in Psychology
1 to 12 Credits
A field experience in the area of psychology. Only 3 practicum credits may be applied to the major. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

4271 - Research Practicum in Psychology
1 to 12 Credits
A research experience in the field of psychology supervised by a faculty member. Only 3 research practicum credits may be applied to the major. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

4281 - Teaching Practicum in Psychology
3 Credits
A mentoring experience in conducting undergraduate psychology laboratories. Practicum students work with a supervising professor in preparation and presentation of instruction and laboratory exercises and providing feedback to students. Ethical, organizational and practical issues will be discussed. Only 3 practicum credits may be applied to the major. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

4351 - Psychopharmacology
3 Credits
An advanced examination of pharmacological agents and their effects on neuronal function, with a particular emphasis on the alteration of behavioral states. Major drug classes, their pharmacological properties and their use to treat various psychological disorders will be covered. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C and BIOL 1311 Minimum Grade of C).

4901 - Special Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of special topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

4921 - Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
Coverage of topics in psychology. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). This course is repeatable as topic changes.

4951 - Senior Capstone in Psychology I
1 Credit
Use of developed skills in the field of psychology to prepare students for graduate studies in psychology or careers in psychology. Students will be exposed to the Psychology GRE subject test, graduate school interview process, preparation of a curriculum vitae, preparation of a personal statement, reviewing psychological journal articles, and preparation of literature review or experimental study proposal. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C and PSYC 3401 Minimum Grade of C).

4961 - Senior Capstone in Psychology II
1 Credit
Continuation of PSYC 4951. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (PSYC 1001 Minimum Grade of C and PSYC 3401 Minimum Grade of C and PSYC 4951 Minimum Grade of C).

4971 - Independent Study in Psychology
1 to 4 Credits
Offered fall and spring semesters. This course may be repeated one time.

Sociology

Sociology Major (37 credit hours)

Sociology majors must complete a core set of courses covering research methodology, data analysis and sociological theory as well as a series of elective courses covering areas such as criminology, social psychology, social stratification and medical sociology. These degree requirements prepare students for graduate work in sociology and related fields, as well as entry into the job market.

Sociology majors will be enrolled in either the General Sociology concentration or the Social Services Administration Concentration

General Sociology Concentration (37-40 credit hours)

The general sociology concentration is designed to prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce or graduate study by providing a broad survey of the discipline.

  • SOC 1001 Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1 Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 4461 Classical Sociological Theory (3)
  • SOC 4471 Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)

Other required courses

  • ISR 2531 Research Methods (3)
  • ISR 2541 Data Analysis (4)
  • STAT 1561 Statistics for Professionals 1 (3)

Social Service Administration Concentration (40 hours)

Students in the Social Services Administration concentration will complete the equivalent of three years of study at ONU including 92 credit hours of coursework, 40 hours of coursework within the SSA concentration, all distributional requirements of the Getty College of Arts and Sciences and 15 artifacts toward the completion of the ONU general education requirements.

At the completion of the three years of study at ONU the student may transition into the Masters of Science in Social Administration pro­gram at Case Western Reserve University assuming they have met the requirements set forth by CWRU and are accepted into the program. The fourth and fifth years of study are completed at CWRU.

  • SOC 1001 Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • PSYC 1001 Introduction to Psychology (3)
  • STAT 1561 Statistics for Professionals 1  (3)
  • ISR 2531 Research Methods 1 (3)
  • ISR 2541 Research Methods 2 (4)
  • SOC 4471 Classical Sociological Theory (3)
  • SOC 4xx1 Practicum (Capstone requirement) (3)

Students will take four (4) of the following Sociology courses

  • SOC 2401- Sociology of the Family (3)
  • SOC 2431- Deviant Behavior (3)
  • SOC 2501- Cultural Anthropology (3)
  • SOC 2601- Social Problems (3)
  • SOC 2611- Criminology (3)
  • SOC 2631- Victimology (3)
  • SOC 3461- Social Stratification (3)
  • SOC 3471- Race, Class, Gender (3)
  • SOC 3481- Sociology of Health and Health Care (3)
  • SOC 3491- Sociology of Mental Health and Illness (3)
  • SOC 3551- Advanced Data Analysis (3)
  • SOC 3611- Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3)
  • SOC 3631- Sociology of Substance Abuse (3)

Students will select two (2) of the following Psychology Courses

  • PSYC 2161/2171- Child Psychology or Adolescent Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 2301- Introduction to Counseling (3)
  • PSYC 2101 – Motivation and Emotion (3)
  • PSYC 2201 – Health Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 2261 – Human Sexual Behavior (3)
  • PSYC 3011- Social Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 3121- Psychological Assessment (3)

If a student declares the SSA later in the academic career, no ad­justments will be made to the SSA curriculum.

If a student decides, upon completion of the SSA requirements at ONU, that they do not wish to complete the MSSA, do not want to continue their graduate work at CWRU or is not accepted by CWRU for graduate study, the student will transition to the general sociology concentration and complete the degree requirements as established.

If a student is unable to complete the MSSA program at CWRU, a re­view of the coursework finished at CWRU will be completed to determine if the student has completed appropriate requirements for an ONU de­gree. The student may be required to return to ONU to complete degree requirements for the general sociology concentration.

Sociology Minor (28 credit hours)

  • SOC 1001    Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1    Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1    Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1    Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 2xx1-4xx1    Sociology electives (3)
  • SOC 4461    Classical Sociological Theory (3)

Other required courses

  • ISR 2531    Research Methods (3)
  • ISR 2541    Data Analysis (4)
  • STAT 1561 Statistics for Professionals 1  (3)

Subject Courses - Sociology (SOC)

1001 - Introduction to Sociology
3 Credits
The basic phenomena and processes of social life: culture, socialization, deviance, social institutions (family, economy, education, religion, military), bureaucratization, collective behavior, social inequality, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Analysis of the interplay between the person and social groups. Offered fall and spring semesters.

2301 - Sociology of Religion
3 Credits
Survey of the sociological study of religion as a social institution within a social system. Trends and patterns of individual, group, and organizational religious behavior are assessed using critical and empirical analysis, sociological theories, ideas and concepts. Offered alternate spring semesters.

2401 - Sociology of the Family
3 Credits
Historical, cross cultural, and analytical study of family with emphasis on ideology and the effects of social structures and agencies on family composition and roles. Offered fall semester.

2431 - Deviant Behavior
3 Credits
Sociological perspectives on the processes of individual and group deviance. An examination of how deviant behavior is defined, how the definitions are maintained, and how the violators are processed. Theory and research regarding specific classes of deviants are explored, and current public policy issues concerning deviants are discussed. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2501 - Cultural Anthropology
3 Credits
The major concepts and principles of cultural anthropology, emphasizing the understanding of the total configuration and interrelationships of culture traits, complexes, and social relationships in a particular geographic environment and historical context. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2601 - Social Problems
3 Credits
Sociological perspectives on contemporary problems and the process by which these issues come to be socially constructed as problems. Offered alternate spring semesters.

2611 - Criminology
3 Credits
The nature and extent of crime, development of criminological theory, major forms of criminal behavior, and society’s attempts at prevention and control of crime. The major perspectives, issues and diverse concerns that characterize contemporary criminology are presented. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2631 - Victimology
3 Credits
The history of victimology, patterns of victimization, the role of the victim in crime, the victim in the criminal justice system (including jury perceptions of victims), victim assistance programs, and victim/offender reconciliation programs. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

2901 - Special Topics
1 Credit
Coverage of topics in sociology. Offered fall and spring semesters.

3461 - Social Stratification
3 Credits
The origins, institutionalization and change of class, status, prestige, power, and other forms of social inequality with attention to the effects of stratification on the individual. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). 

3471 - Race, Class, and Gender
3 Credits
Analysis of the structural interplay and social ramifications of race, social class, and gender. The course focuses on power relationships, intra and intergroup conflict, and minority relations. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3481 - Sociology of Health and Health Care
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the social dimensions of health, illness, and health care. The sociology of health and health care, often referred to as medical sociology, examines a broad range of topics relevant to those in many fields of study. These topics include the social distribution of disease, social stress, health and illness behaviors, medical professions, the doctor-patient relationship, and health care systems. Offered alternate fall semesters.

3491 - Sociology of Mental Health and Illness
3 Credits
Sociological perspectives on the definition, causes, patterning, and responses to mental health and illness. Topics include sociological (versus psychological or biological) theories of mental health and illness, the stress process, and the differential distribution of mental health and illness by race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, age, and marital status. Also covers the labeling or social construction of mental illness, as well as how society and various social institutions respond to those in need of treatment. Offered alternate spring semesters.

3501 - Self and Identity
3 Credits
The theories of and research done on the self, self-concept, and identities in humans from both sociological and psychological perspectives. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3551 - Advanced Data Analysis
3 Credits
Multivariate statistical procedures, including measures of association for nominal and ordinal variables as well as correlation. Simple, multiple and logistic regression. Cleaning data, and construction of and evaluation of measurement scales. Involves the use of statistical software.

3611 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice
3 Credits
An analysis of competing theoretical approaches to the causes of delinquent behavior, and the study of the prevention, treatment, and control of delinquency. Procedures and major contemporary issues in Juvenile Justice are addressed. Offered alternate spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C).

3621 - Occupational Crime and Deviance
3 Credits
The various forms of criminal and deviant behavior that occur in the occupational context. A discussion of the natures, extent, consequences, and strategies to control this behavior. Major theoretical perspectives on occupational crime and deviance are considered. Topics covered include: white-collar crime, organized crime, employee theft, career criminality, and workplace violence. Offered alternate spring semesters.

3631 - Sociology of Substance Abuse
3 Credits
The nature and extent of substance abuse in the United States. Correlates and consequences of substance use. Sociological and sociopsychological theories of substance abuse. Strategies for dealing with the problem of substance abuse (e.g., prevention, treatment, education, public policy). Offered alternate spring semesters.

3901 - Special Topics in Sociology
1 Credit
Coverage of topics in sociology. Offered fall and spring semesters.

4461 - Classical Sociological Theory
3 Credits
Traces sociological theorizing from sociology’s historical origins. Major theorists covered include Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, and Chicago School sociologists. Emphasis on building an understanding of the roots of contemporary social theory. Senior status. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C). Corequisite(s): SOC 4881.

4471 - Contemporary Sociological Theory
3 Credits
The major sociological theories developed since 1950. An examination of the critical debates in contemporary social theory. Senior status. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1001 Minimum Grade of C) Corequisite(s): SOC 4891.

4811 - Sociology Internship
4 to 16 Credits
Supervised placement in an agency which involves work experience related to sociology or criminology or work experience on a research project. Senior status, 2.75 GPA, consent of instructor, and approval of department chair. Offered fall and spring semesters.

4881 - Senior Capstone Research 1
2 Credits
Development of research topic and/or question, literature review, and outline of research project directed by faculty advisor. Capstone Research does not count toward sociology elective hours. Senior status, sociology primary major, and permission of advisor. Offered fall and spring semesters. Corequisite(s): SOC 4461.

4891 - Senior Capstone Research 2
3 Credits
Research design, data collection, data analysis, and writing of the research paper directed by faculty advisor. Capstone Research does not count toward sociology elective hours. Offered fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite(s): (SOC 4881 Minimum Grade of C) Corequisite(s): SOC 4471.

4981 - Independent Study in Sociology
1 to 4 Credits
Approval of department chair. Offered fall and spring semesters.

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice Major (56 credit hours)

Criminal justice prepares students for careers in law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole, juvenile justice, crime analysis, and courts administrations. A highly interdisciplinary major, criminal justice focuses on the political, administrative, sociological and psychological aspects of crime and the criminal justice system. A minor in geography/GIS provides direction for the criminal justice major and develops practical skills that are of increasing value in the workplace. In addition, students may also pursue course work in forensic science offered in cooperation with the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences. All criminal justice majors must complete an internship.

  • CJ 1211 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
  • CJ 2001 CJ Systems: The Police (3)
  • CJ 2101 CJ Systems: The Courts (3)
  • CJ 2201 CJ Systems: Corrections (3)
  • CJ 3xx1/4xx1 CJ elective1, 2 (3)
  • CJ 3xx1/4xx1 CJ elective1, 2 (3)
  • CJ 3xx1/4xx1 CJ elective1, 2 (3)
  • CJ 4711 Public Service Internship2 (3)
  • CJ 4981 Senior Thesis 1 (1)
  • CJ 4991 Senior Thesis 2 (2)

Other required courses:

  • GEOG 2481 Introduction to GIS (3)
  • ISR 2531 Research Methods (3)
  • ISR 2541 Data Analysis (4)
  • STAT 1561 Statistics for Professionals 1 (3)
  • PSYC 1001 Psychology (3)
  • SOC 1051 Sociology (3)
  • SOC 2611 Criminology (3)
  • PLSC 2011 American Politics (3) or PLSC 3011 State and Local Politics (3)

Complete two departmentally approved, major-appropriate courses from the following:

  • PLSC 3xx1/4xx1 PLSC elective (3)
  • PSYC 3xx1/4xx1 PSYC elective (3)
  • SOC 3xx1/4xx1 SOC elective (3)

Notes:

  1. Weekend Seminar (CJ 3021) is a 1 credit hour course that students may repeat as the topic varies. The student may apply exactly 3 credit hours of CJ 3021 to CJ elective credit. The student may apply exactly 3 credit hours of PLSC 4761 to CJ elective credit.

  2. The criminal justice major requires a total of 600 on-site hours of Public Service Internship (CJ 4711). The student must enroll in at least 1 credit hour of Public Service Internship for each internship experience. The student may apply exactly 3 credit hours of CJ 4711 to CJ elective credit upon the approval of the Internship Committee.

Forensic Science Option (33 credit hours)

Only criminal justice majors may declare the forensic science option. Every course required for this option must be completed with a grade of “C” or higher.

  • BIOL 1311 Biology 1: Cells and Molecules (4)
  • BIOL 1321 Biology 2: Form and Function (4)
  • BIOL 2101 Genetics (4)
  • BIOL 2171 Molecular Biology (3)
  • BIOL 2191 Forensic Biology 1 (4)
  • BIOL 2311 Anatomy and Physiology 1 (3)
  • BIOL 2591 Forensic Crime Scene Investigation (4)
  • BIOL 3521 Integrated Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory (2)
  • CHEM 1201 Chemistry - Health Sciences (5)

Investigative Accounting Option (18 credit hours)

  •  BIZ 2101 Accounting Foundations for Business Planning (3)
  •  ACCT 2201 Accounting Foundations 2 (3)
  •  ACCT 3011 Intermediate Financial Accoutning 1 (3)
  •  ACCT 3021 Intermediate Financial Accounting 2 (3)
  •  ACCT 3031 Auditing 1 (3)
  •  ACCT 3871 Taxation 1 (3)

Criminal Justice Minor (24 credit hours)

  • CJ 1211 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
  • CJ 2001 CJ Systems: The Police (3)
  • CJ 2101 CJ Systems: Corrections (3)
  • GEOG 2481 Introduction to GIS (3)
  • SOC 1051 Sociology (3)
  • SOC 2611 Criminology (3)
  • STAT 1561 Statistics for Professionals 1 (3)
  • PLSC 3541 Judicial Process, Behavior, and Impact (3)

Subject Courses - Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 1211 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits
Concepts, issues, substance, structures of the American criminal justice system, causes of criminal behavior, theories of law and punishment, and the roles of various actors within the system. Course Attribute(s): Critical and Creative Thinking, Effective Communication Non-Writing.

CJ 2001 - Criminal Justice Systems: The Police
3 Credits
Historical, philosophical and legal basis of police institutions, practices and procedures. Issue oriented course. Discussion topics will vary with prevailing policing issues.

CJ 2101 - Criminal Justice Systems: The Courts
3 Credits
Prosecution and defense in criminal cases. Constitutional rules that apply to criminal cases at trial and under appeal. The concept of due process. The rights and limitations of the state and the defense under the Bill of Rights. Preliminary hearings, arraignment, trials, sentencing, and appeals.

CJ 2201 - Criminal Justice Systems: Corrections
3 Credits
Historical, philosophical and legal basis of correctional procedures and institutions. Probation and parole. Issue oriented course. Discussion topics will vary with prevailing corrections issues.

CJ 3021 - Nature Center Seminar in Criminal Justice
1 Credit
Weekend seminar at the Metzger Nature Center on a wide range of topics in criminal justice. May be repeated as topic varies. A Nature Center use fee is charged. Unlimited repeats permitted.

CJ 3401 - Comparative Criminal Justice
3 Credits
Comparison of the American criminal justice system with international systems from the common, civil, socialist, and Islamic legal traditions. Comparative analysis of police, courts, corrections, and legal definitions of crime. Transnational crime.

CJ 3431 - Substantive Criminal Law
3 Credits
Law as a method of social control. The nature, sources, and types of criminal law. History and theories of criminal law. Behavioral and legal aspects of criminal acts. Classification and analysis of selected criminal offenses. Common law doctrine, statutory reform, and constitutional law that affect the substantive criminal law.

CJ 3541 - Women in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
Women in the American criminal justice system. Women as offenders, victims of crime, and criminal justice professionals. Feminist theories of criminology. Impact of sexism, prejudice, and discrimination. Course Attribute(s): Diversity-Human Interaction.

CJ 3551 - Minorities in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
Racial and ethnic minorities in the American criminal justice system. Minority and ethnic group members as offenders, victims of crime, and criminal justice professionals. Impact of racism, prejudice, and discrimination. Course Attribute(s): Critical and Creative Thinking, Diversity-Human Interaction.

CJ 3561 - Juvenile Justice
3 Credits
Operations of the American juvenile justice system. The history of juvenile delinquency and the evolution of the juvenile justice system. Police treatment of juveniles, juvenile rights, juvenile court procedures, treatment and punishment of juvenile offenders. Prevention of juvenile delinquency. Course Attribute(s): Diversity-Human Interaction.

CJ 3601 - Criminal Investigation
3 Credits
Principles and theories of criminal investigative procedure. Organizing and managing investigations. Techniques for collecting, evaluating, and preserving evidence. Interrogation and arrest of suspects. Effective report writing and trial preparation.

CJ 3901 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
May be repeated as topic varies. Unlimited repeats permitted.

CJ 4011 - The Death Penalty
3 Credits
Examination of the Eighth Amendment and the death penalty. Major United States Supreme Court decisions that relate to the death penalty. Theoretical and practical perspectives on the death penalty. Historical development of the death penalty. Capital trials, the appeals process, methods of execution, and the doctrine of proportionality. Comparisons between male and female capital offenders. Rules that govern insane and juvenile capital offenders. The costs of executions.

CJ 4101 - Criminal Behavior
3 Credits
Use of the descriptions and explanations that criminals themselves provide to understand how people become criminals. The roles that social and peer groups, social environment, and learning play in the process. Theoretical and policy implications of criminal behavior. Course Attribute(s): Diversity-Human Interaction.

CJ 4111 - Serial Killers
3 Credits
The historical origins of the concept of serial killers. The methods, motives, and psychological background of American serial killers. The culture of serial killers. Theories to explain serial killing. The concept and application of profiling.

CJ 4121 - Domestic Violence
3 Credits
Definitions and causes of domestic violence. The evolution of social and legal responses to domestic violence. Types of domestic violence and the experiences of victims. Prevention of domestic abuse. Course Attribute(s): Critical and Creative Thinking.

CJ 4211 - Crime and the Media
3 Credits
Representations of crime and the criminal justice system in the media. How media representations affect society and the criminal justice system. How the media construct reality, influence attitudes and perceptions of crime and criminality, and affect criminal cases.

CJ 4621 - Issues in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
Intensive study of selected topics related to criminal justice. May be repeated as topic varies. Unlimited repeats permitted.

CJ 4711 - Public Service Internship Program
1 to 15 Credits
Field experience in the area of public service. Student works in a close relationship with public offices and officials or approved private agencies and firms. Student must enroll in at least 1 credit hour of Public Service Internship per internship experience. A full time Public Service Internship requires 600 hours of on-site work. Student may apply up to 15 credit hours of departmental internship to the BA degree. Consultation with the department internship committee and completion of the application process; 2.75 GPA. Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior, Senior. This course is repeatable for a total of 15 hours.

CJ 4721 - Seminar - The Washington Center Seminar
3 Credits
Course Attribute(s): Requires Department Approval.

CJ 4901 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
May be repeated as topic varies. Formerly PLSC 490. Unlimited repeats permitted.

CJ 4941 - Seminar in Criminal Justice
3 Credits
May be repeated as topic varies. Unlimited repeats permitted.

CJ 4961 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice
1 to 3 Credits
Unlimited repeats permitted. Course Attribute(s): Requires Department Approval.

CJ 4981 - Senior Thesis 1
1 Credit
Topic selection and development of bibliography and outline for senior thesis under the direction of a departmental faculty member. First part of departmental Capstone course for majors in Criminal Justice. Required of all Criminal Justice majors. Enrollment at least two semesters before the semester of expected graduation. Formerly PLSC 488. Prerequisite(s): (ISR 2531 Minimum Grade of C or ISR 253 Minimum Grade of C) and (ISR 2541 Minimum Grade of C or ISR 254 Minimum Grade of C). Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study: Criminal Justice. Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior, Senior.

CJ 4991 - Senior Thesis 2
2 Credits
Completion of senior thesis under the direction of a departmental faculty member and a second reader. Second part of departmental Capstone course for majors in Criminal Justice. Required of all Criminal Justice majors. Enrollment at least one semester before the semester of expected graduation. Prerequisite(s): CJ 4981 Minimum Grade of C or PLSC 488 Minimum Grade of C. Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of Study: Criminal Justice. Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior, Senior.

 

Psychology, Sociology, and Criminal Justice

Robert Carrothers

419-772-2135
r-carrothers@onu.edu
Hill 018
525 South Main Street
Ada, Ohio 45810
Monday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed