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Katy Rossiter

Assistant Professor of Geography
History, Political Science, & Geography
Hill Memorial 204C
525 S. Main Street
Ada, OH 45810
419-772-2096
419-772-2593
Professional Experience: 
Ohio Northern University Department of History, Political Science, and Geography, Ada, OH
August 2016 -   Assistant Professor of Geography
   
George Mason University Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science; Fairfax, VA
January – May 2016 Adjunct Professor; Human Geography
   
United States Census Bureau  
July 2010 - June 2016  Supervisory Geographer; U.S. Census Bureau Headquarters
October 2008 – June 2010 Supervisory Geographer; Kansas City Regional Census Center
July 2005 – September 2008 Supervisory Geographer; Denver Regional Census Center
   
Louisiana State University Department of Geography and Anthropology; Baton Rouge, LA
August 2004 - June 2005 Research Assistant
August 2004 - June 2005 Intern; U.S. Geological Survey

 

Education: 

Ph.D. in Earth Systems and Geoinformation Science; George Mason University; Fairfax, VA; December 2015.
Dissertation Title: Evaluating Multiple Criteria for (Re)districting

M.S. in Geography; Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA; May 2005.
Thesis Title: Long-Term Changes and Variability in Northern Hemisphere Circumpolar Vortex

B.S. in Meteorology; Northern Illinois University; DeKalb, IL; May 2002.

Teaching Interests: 

Political Geography

Population Geography

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Physical Geography

Meteorology

Climatology

Selected Publications: 

Rossiter, K.M. Wong, D.S.W., and Delamater, P.L. 2018.  Congressional Redistricting:  Keeping Communities Together?  The Professional Geographer.  Published online April 23, 2018 (Print forthcoming).

Wrona, K.M. and Rohli, R.V. 2007. Seasonality of the northern hemisphere circumpolar vortex. International Journal of Climatology 27: 697-713.

Rohli, R.V., Wrona, K.M., and McHugh, M.J. 2004. January northern hemispheric circumpolar vortex variability and its relationship with hemispheric temperature and regional telecommunications. International Journal of Climatology 25: 1421-1436.

 

PRESENTATIONS

Rossiter, K.M. 2018. Making GIS course attractive to non-geography majors:  One example.  2018 American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting; New Orleans, Louisiana; April 4 - April 8.

Rossiter, K.M. and Wong, D.W. 2017.  Does drastically redrawing congressional districts mean new blood in Congress?  2017 Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting; Boston, Massachusetts; April 4 - April 8.

Rossiter, K.M. and Wong, D.W. 2016. Congressional districts: Keeping Communities Together? 2016 Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting; San Francisco, California; March 29 – April 2.

Rossiter, K.M. and Wong, D.W. 2015. Congressional districts: How “Equal” are They? 2015 Applied Geographers Conference; San Antonio, Texas; November 5.

Rossiter, K.M. 2012. Geographic Products. State Data Center Conference; Suitland, Maryland; October 17.

Rossiter, K.M. 2006. Gearing up for 2010: Geographic Programs Leading up to the Census. GIS in the Rockies; Denver, Colorado; September 13.

Rossiter, K.M. 2006. Gearing up for 2010: Geographic Programs Leading up to the Census. North Dakota GIS User’s Conference; Bismarck, North Dakota; October 24.

Wrona, K.M. and Rohli, R.V. 2005. Seasonal characteristics of the northern hemisphere circumpolar vortex: 1959- 2001. Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting; Denver, Colorado; April 4-9. Second place in student competition.

Wrona, K.M., Rohli, R.V., and McHugh, M.J. 2004. Variability and changes in the area, circularity, and centroid of the January northern hemisphere circumpolar vortex: 1959-2001. Southwest Division of the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting; Nacogdoches, Texas; November 10-12.

 

CONTRIBUTOR

The Lima News:  Although outside of spotlight, Supreme Court case could impact political landscape 

WLIO Lima TV

WSPD Toledo Radio

U.S. Census Bureau Random Samplings Blog

The Washington Post: How the census slices up the nation, in one simple graphic