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Art & Design News

News | 2008-09 Academic Year

Jaye BumbaughONU Alumni Weekend Celebrates the Work of Jaye Bumbaugh
May
—The work of Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59) will be on display at Ohio Northern University’s Elzay Gallery of Art May 29–31. The exhibition honors Jaye and the class of ’59 as they celebrate their 50th class reunion. The show is free and open to the public from noon–6p.m.

A reception for Jaye and for the class of 1959 will be held from 5:15 until 6p.m. Friday, May 29 in the Elzay Gallery and lobby of the Wilson Art Center. Light refreshments will be served.

“I’ve always liked the challenge of working in a diversity of media, method, and scale,” expressed Jaye concerning his work. “I’ve always thought that there have been clear connections among even the most disparate of works. What has remained for me is the pleasure in the material qualities of paint, ink, wax, clay, linoleum, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, etc. I just want to make art. That is really all I have ever really wanted to do. I suppose critics and collectors want artists to be consistent. Realism and abstraction are interchangeable to me.”

Jaye continued, “Each time I create a piece of art I remember my childhood, my innocence, my source. Kurosawa said, ‘To create is to remember.’ Art has always reminded me of who I am when I make art. I’m not always sure if I’m trying to make sense. The whole idea of making art pushes me to some edge; sometimes I don’t know if I have enough answers to finish a piece. But then I think this is the ultimate challenge for the artist—the reward.”

Bumbaugh, a native of Lorain and now a resident of Lima, was a professor at Bluffton University for 37 years until 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University.

While at Bluffon, Jaye was instrumental in bringing the art department curriculum into the contemporary world, introducing new courses in airbrush, paper-making, figure drawing with the life model, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen and relief printmaking, welding and casting metals in sculpture.

Jaye’s work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. He currently is represented at the Marcia Evans Gallery in the Short North in Columbus, Ohio. In his work as an artist, Bumbaugh worked in many media including drawing in graphite, charcoal and pastel, painting in oils and watercolor, relief prints in linoleum, intaglio, silkscreen and lithography. In sculpture, he often has worked in ceramics and cast in bronze. More recently, he has worked with paper constructions in paper, foamboard, silkscreen and rag board.

For additional information at the exhibit, please contact the department of art & design or the alumni relations office.

image: Running Dog with Monkey; Firestorm; Monet

See photos from the reception.

 

 

Kappa PiA Celebration of Scholarship and Achievement
May
—Throughout its history, Ohio Northern University has fostered a tradition of involving undergraduate students in scholarship and research. Students from the department of art & design have presented their work from classes, independent studies and research projects in local and national venues.

Held this past Saturday, Honors Day recognized outstanding students in high-level of scholarship, service and accomplishment to the University community. A highlight of the art & design program included the Kappa Pi induction ceremony, awards presentation and a picnic with family and friends.

This year, Andrew Adams, a freshman graphic design major from Hudson, Ohio, was inducted into Kappa Pi. Andrew has maintained a high level of scholarship, met the organization’s standards, and has been involved in various extracurricular activities including the AIGA/ONU chapter.

Kappa Pi, founded in 1911 at the University of Kentucky, is an international art honorary. Over 165 chapters have been installed in the United States and abroad. Its main purpose is to form bodies of students who will uphold the highest ideals of a liberal education; to raise the standards of productive artistic work among students; to furnish the highest reward for conscientious effort in furthering the best interest of art in the broadest sense of the term.

About 10 A&D students received awards for overall academic achievement or outstanding performance within their major and academic work. Two of the awards were established by or in memory of an ONU alumna.

“It is important that we come together during this annual University tradition to celebrate student achievement,” said Brit Rowe, department of art & design chair. “It’s a time to celebrate students’ achievements and for the faculty and staff to thank our student leaders. It also provides our students a moment to consider not just what they have achieved but what they want to become.”

The following A&D majors earned scholarships and other recognition on Honors Day:

Student Scholarship Recognition
• Katelyn Amendolara, sophomore graphic design major, research paper and project presented at “Minds at Work” student research conference
• Andrew Steingass, senior art/studio arts major, AICUO Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts
• Margaret Schmidt, senior art/graphic design major, internship at the Wexner Center for the Arts
• David Herring, senior art/graphic design major, 1st place award in the black and white category of ArtSpace/Lima’s Photography Juried Exhibition
• Stephanie Rader, senior art/art education major, 3rd place award in the Kappa Pi International Art Honorary scholarship competition
• Jeff Gibbons, sophomore art/studio arts major, accepted into The Center for Cartoon Studies

University Class Honors (highest class GPA)
• Bethany Schreck, sophomore class
• Emily Jay, junior class

Art Department Service Awards
• Matthew Glove, sophomore graphic design major
• Andrew Steingass, senior art/studio arts major

Kappa Pi Service Award
• Stephanie Rader, senior art/art education major

AIGA Leadership Award
• Arnaldo Jimenez, senior graphic design major
• Margaret Schmidt, senior graphic design major

Senior Department Honors
• Art Education: Stephanie Rader
• Studio Arts: Andrew Steingass
• Graphic Design: Margaret Schmidt

Shelly C. Petrillo Scholarship Awards
• Junior: Bethany Schreck
• Senior: Emily Jay

 

Andrew AdamsFoundations Honors Exhibit To Display Year’s Best Work
May
—The Ohio Northern University department of art & design will host the annual Foundations Honors Exhibit on Friday, May 10 through Friday, Aug. 28 in the lobby of the Elzay Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is open to all ONU students enrolled in the foundations courses during the 2008-09 academic year. Work in any medium is accepted, including drawings, two-and three-dimensional work, color theory studies, photography, and ceramics. Faculty members of the foundations program assist students in making their initial selections for the show.

The Foundations Program is organized to challenge and educate first-year students toward the mastery of compositional, conceptual, technical, theoretical and practical aspects of art and design. The foundations courses lay down the groundwork upon which all the department’s specialized programs continue to build.

Art & design majors participating in this year’s exhibit include:
Andrew Adams, Hudson
Danielle Castelan, Republic
Andrew Crozier, Ada
Kayla Holdgreve, Lima
Rachel Pioch, Northwood
Carly Sacha, Cincinnati
Greg Stawicki, Wellington
Benjamin Stoll, Barberton
Leisel Stout, Hamilton
Roger Young, Waynesfield
Corey Zinser, Clermont

Exhibiting work is an integral component of a student’s experience in the department of art & design. For the students, the Foundations Honors Exhibition is intended to give them their first experience in a professional atmosphere and to showcase their works in a professional way.

Melissa Eddings, associate professor of art and coordinator of this year’s exhibition, says the exhibit reflects the accomplishments of first-year students. “The courses in the foundations program help bridge the gap between high school and college. Students develop a strong visual vocabulary and competent form-in-space depiction. From this strong beginning, students can begin to communicate the mind’s eye in a confident, believable way—and start to share their personal voice with the rest of the community.”

Admission to the exhibit is free and open to the public, weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For additional information about the University’s gallery season, contact the department of art and design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

image: graphite drawing completed by Andrew Adams, freshman graphic design major; assignment completed in Professor Melissa Eddings’ course, Drawing/Illustration.

 

Arnaldo JimenezOhio Northern Senior BA/BFA Candidates To Exhibit Work in Elzay Gallery
May
—It’s spring at Ohio Northern University, a demanding time for many seniors on campus. For the art and design students, this is an intense but rewarding rite of passage that few undergraduates outside of art and design programs ever experience.

This May, seven bachelor of arts and fine arts candidates in studio arts, art education and graphic design have devoted a full year to producing a thematically focused body of work as part of the required senior capstone experience. “During the students’ senior year,” explains Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design, “they begin to transform their attitudes from one of an art or design student working on assigned projects to one of an artist or designer engaged in a life-long process of development and learning.”

“This experience serves as the crowning point of the students’ education,” describes Brit. “Students know how to build a body of work. They know how to think about its connection to the broader world. They know how to integrate principles, theories and methods learned in courses in an applied context.”

One aspect of the thesis experience is the capstone project. The capstone project is designed to encourage students to define the complex intersection between personal voice, conceptual understanding, the ability to conduct and use research, and to effectively use their liberal arts education in a process of creating a compelling, professional presentation.

“This part of the process is largely self-directed,” describes Brit. “The process presents to students an extraordinary opportunity to identify an area of interest, investigate it, and use art and design as the vehicle to present their findings.”

In addition to the thesis experience, students also design and install an exhibition of their work and give a presentation to the department faculty. “The gallery presentation is essentially the students’ portfolios,” said Brit. “The body of work must demonstrate what the students have learned and must go beyond classroom exercises and assignments to incorporate complex problems, ideas and solutions.”

The 2009 BA/BFA candidates featured in the exhibition are:
Christopher Gaghan, Strongsville
Stephen Gill, Pandora
David Herring, Belle Center
Arnaldo Jimenez, Cleveland
Stephanie Rader, Mt. Cory
Margaret Schmidt, Cincinnati
Andrew Steingass, Ada

The students’ portfolios will be on display during the opening reception of the Senior Thesis Exhibition, Saturday, May 9, 1–3p.m. in the Elzay Gallery of Art. The exhibition is on view through Friday, May 22.

Admission to the Elzay Gallery is free and open to the public, daily from noon–5p.m. For additional information about the University’s exhibition season, contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

image: Turn the Tap Campaign Poster, by Arnaldo Jimenez. Campaign materials were written and designed to lower the consumption of bottled water on ONU’s campus.

 

Harry MelroyOhio Northern Alumni and Students Accepted into Findlay Art League’s May Show
May
—Always colorful and thought provoking, the Findlay Art League’s “May Show” drew a large crowd during the weekend. And once again, Ohio Northern University was well represented at this year’s exhibit.

Junior art/art education major Julie Brewer and ONU graduates Harry Melroy (BA ’71), Ed Corle (BA ’78) and Laura Barnhardt-Corle (BFA ’77) were among the artists accepted into the annual spring show.

The exhibition opening and awards presentation took place Friday, May 1. ONU award winners included Harry Melroy who earned honorable mention for “Rocket Head Explains It All,” an oil painting on canvas.

The judges for the show were Don Williams and Sue Harington-Williams of Findlay. They explained, “The diversity and competence was extraordinary for a group of work this size. Subject matter to media, size to color, [the exhibit] provided this community with a great opportunity to see good work.”

Describing the show, co-coordinator Marilyn Dillon said, “The exhibition has always been a great exponent of the variation offered by the Findlay area and the talent that thrives within it. This year, we are exhibiting some artists who have shown before and some first-year exhibitors. There are even students within the show—a fact that pays tribute to the quality of the art programs in our region.”

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Admission to the exhibit is free, and open to the public, and runs through Saturday, May 30. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10a.m.–2p.m. The gallery is located at 117 W. Crawford Street in Findlay.

image: Rocket Head Explains It All by Harry Melroy, oil painting on canvas.

 

Andrew Steingass, AICUO AwardOhio Northern Student Accepts AICUO Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts
April
—On Monday, April 20, Ohio Northern University art student Andrew Steingass, a senior studio arts major from Ada, Ohio, accepted the 2009 Excellence in Visual Arts Award from the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio (AICUO). He was chosen from a field of 21 students nominated from colleges and universities affiliated with the AICUO. Each member institution (49 total) was allowed to nominate two seniors for the award.

At a formal ceremony held in Columbus, Ohio, Andrew received his award from the AICUO President, Todd Jones. In attendance from Ohio Northern were Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design; Melissa Eddings, associate professor of art & design; and ONU President and Mrs. Kenneth Baker.

The Excellence in Visual Arts award was created as an opportunity for AICUO institutions to recognize outstanding senior art majors who display superb range of work and maturity as an artist. The AICUO was organized in 1969 to represent the interests of its members to Ohio's lawmakers, regulators and citizens. AICUO seeks to strengthen student financial aid programs and bring about a greater understanding of the impact and contributions of Ohio independent colleges and universities.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

image: Pictured with Andrew are Prof. Brit Rowe, Prof. Melissa Eddings, and President Baker.

 

ArtSpace/LimaONU Professor and Alumni Accepted into Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima
April
—The Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima has quite the pedigree: 50 years of bringing the highest quality of artwork to Lima. And this year’s exhibit adds even more luster to its already shining reputation.

“This is all the best the region has to offer,” said Bill Sullivan, operations manager at ArtSpace. “When I look at it, I am very pleased with the work.”

Out of the 47 artists represented in the juried show, four have ties to Ohio Northern: Professor Linda Lehman, visiting assistant to the director of the Center for Teacher Education at ONU; Alumnus Jaye Bumbaugh; Alumnus Ed Corle; and Alumnus Harry Melroy.

And every year, it seems that ONU faculty or alumni earn awards in the show for their exemplary work. This year, again, was no exception.

Ohio Northern graduate Harry Melroy won the Second Award for one his acrylic paintings. He also won an honorable mention for another painting.

“These are superb, high-quality artists,” stated Sullivan. “And the work they’re displaying here is as good as we could ever want.”

Judging this year’s show were Judy Greavu and Bruce Chesser, both retired art professors at Ohio Northern University.

“This exhibit offers proof of a diverse visual art community within the 100 mile radius of Lima, Ohio,” explains Professors Greavu and Chesser. “Representational, abstract and non objective visual statements were included to adequately represent the range of work submitted. Formal control and compositional integrity needed to be demonstrated for work to be included in the exhibit. Works were then selected for unique viewpoints or extra intensity.”

Prof. Linda Lehman, a former public school classroom and art instructor, teaches art education at ONU. Two watercolor pieces by Linda were accepted into this year’s exhibit:
Burdens, watercolor
Sunlit, watercolor

While at Ohio Northern, Linda began an innovative Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) program for ONU education students and children from surrounding school districts. This past October, Linda received a 20-year Circa Recognition Award by the Ohio Art Education Association and was inducted into the OAEA’s Circa Honor Society.

Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59), a retired art professor from Bluffton University and past chair of the school’s art department, received his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. His work will be featured in May at an exhibit during ONU’s Alumni Weekend in celebration of his class’ 50th reunion.

Jaye had three pieces accepted into the show:
Catwalk, silkscreen, ragboard, foamboard
Picasso Looking at His (Girl Before a Mirror, 1032), watercolor and plastic tape
Blue Owl, ceramic

Ed Corle (BA ’78) is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. His work accepted into ArtSpace included:
Drip, ceramic
Moon, ceramic

Ed has been with UF since 1986. Ed graduated from Ohio Northern University and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Harry MelroyHarry Melroy (BA ’71) earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree from Northern Illinois University. Harry’s award-winning work at ArtSpace included:
A Closer Look, acrylic (Second Award)
Cut the Cake, acrylic (Honorable Mention)
Barrel Plug, charcoal and pastel

Harry teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University. Harry’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa. He has won numerous awards for his work.

“This is one of the oldest programs we put on here,” explains Sullivan. “This art show was started by the Lima Art Association at least 50 years ago, originally as a show in the autumn. Over the years, it gained momentum and got the reputation of being one of the strongest shows we do all year. It draws all the good people entering, in part because of its pedigree.”

The Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima is on view from April 17–June 30. Admission to the Ellen Nelson Gallery is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10a.m.–5p.m., Saturday, 10a.m.–2p.m. and closed Sunday and Monday. Please contact ArtSpace for additional information (419.222.1721).

ArtSpace/Lima is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing visual arts to the West Central Ohio region including. Its organization occupies a turn-of-the-century three-story brick building in the North West quadrant of Town Square in Downtown Lima, Ohio.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

 

 

Jeff GibbonsFrom Sketchbooks to Laptop: ONU Student Accepted into Summer Program
April—
Summer can be a great time to gain a variety of professional experiences: career-oriented jobs, internships or realizing many other responsibilities. For one Ohio Northern student with a passion and appreciation for graphic novels, storytelling, writing, and design, it is an adventure into the world of comics.

Jeff Gibbons, a sophomore studio arts major from Toledo, Ohio, will be brushing up on some skills, learning new ones, and discovering more of the cartoon world at The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont. He will be attending the Cartoon Studio program after being accepted and earning a scholarship.

“To be considered for a scholarship,” explains Jeff, “I submitted an application, an essay, and a few pieces from my portfolio. I am excited to be able to spend a week in a community dedicated to illustrating. I know the experience will inform my work for years to come.”

The Cartooning Studio program is a 5-day cartooning intensive, ideal for college students. Through lectures and classroom exercises, the CCS faculty will cover the basics of visual storytelling but with a strong focus on designing, crafting and self-publishing comics. This goal-orientated workshop will give Jeff the support necessary to create and self-publish his own independent project.

“I don’t know for sure what I want to do,” describes Jeff. “I know I’ll learn a good deal of things. I’ll also be able to network and talk to some of the most respected comic book artists in the business, like Steve Bissette. He has worked for all the ‘Big Four’ companies, including DC Comics.”

Stephen R. Bissette will be one of the summer faculty members at the CCS. He has won many industry awards as a cartoonist, writer, editor and publisher. A pioneer graduate of the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon & Graphic Art, he is best-known for Saga of the Swamp Thing, Taboo, ‘1963,’ Tyrant, co-creating John Constantine, and creating the world’s second ‘24-Hour Comic,’ invented by Scott McCloud as a challenge for Bissette. His comic efforts fueled numerous films and he has written many essays on the subject. His previous work in education includes lecturing at Yale, Dartmouth College, Duquesne University, Smith College, Marlboro College and Middlebury College’s Breadloaf Young Writers Workshop.

Besides studying with some of the industries most well-known artists, Jeff will also take advantage of the Extended Studio Option. “The Extended Studio is an additional three-day workshop designed for students who want to extend their time at CCS,” explains Jeff. “After the week-long workshop, I want to either finish my independent project or take that project to the next level with the guidance of the CCS faculty. I also want to make sure I have time to explore and read in The Schulz Library.”

Located in the historic Bridge Street firehouse, on the edge of the White River, The Schulz Library maintains a unique collection of contemporary graphic novels, out-of-print and rare collections and classic newspaper strips. “The Schulz Library is a dream come true for the cartoonist bibliophile.”

In addition to comic books and graphic novels, the library holds an extensive collection of books about cartooning, both academic and instructional. The reference section is a great resource on a variety of fine arts including design, illustration, animation, and photography.

“This is a great opportunity. I want to know what other people do and how they do it,” states Jeff. “Also, I just want to get better at sequential narrative.”

The Center for Cartoon Studies is dedicated to providing the highest quality of education to students interested in creating visual stories. CCS’s curriculum of art, graphic design, and literature reflect the wide array of skills needed to create comics and graphic novels. CCS emphasizes self-publishing and prepares its students to publish, market, and disseminate their work.

The CCS also offers a two-year course of study that centers on the creation and dissemination of comics, graphic novels and other manifestations of the visual narrative. Experienced and internationally recognized cartoonists, writers, and designers teach classes. The school is located in historic downtown village of White River Junction, Vermont, in the old Colodny Surprise Department Store.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

 

University of the Arts LondonOhio Northern Announces Academic Consortium Agreement with The University of the Arts in London
April
—Ohio Northern University department of art & design announced this month a strategic affiliation agreement with The University of the Arts London. This consortium agreement will provide select Ohio Northern students an opportunity to study at the London-based school for a semester, beginning with the 2009–2010 academic year.

“Ohio Northern’s affiliation with the University of the Arts London is an outstanding opportunity for the university, our college, department, our students and faculty to interact with one of the most respected art and design schools in the world,” commented Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design.

“We are excited that we are one of the few undergraduate programs in the country to be involved with this type of educational program,” commented Rowe. “In additional to selected students being able to study at the University of the Arts London, we are looking forward to the intellectual and cultural exchange opportunities this connection represents as we continue to strengthen and develop our programs.”

University of Arts London is Europe’s largest university for art, design, fashion, communication and the performing arts. The University is a vibrant world center for innovation, comprising six internationally renowned colleges:
• Camberwell College of Arts
• Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design
• Chelsea College of Art and Design
• London College of Communication
• London College of Fashion
• Wimbledon College of Art.

University of the Arts London is a diverse and creative community of 24,000 full and part-time students from over 100 countries. The consortium agreement provides a unique opportunity for visual arts and design students to study in one of the world’s most important cities for graphic design. While living and studying in London, Europe’s hub for museums and design research and technology, design students can enroll in courses such as visual thinking, typography, information design, narrative structures and graphic and spatial design.

The department of art & design already has a specific cooperative art exchange agreement with the University of Ulster in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The University also has agreements with the Studio Art Centers International, Florence, Italy and the Burren School of Art in Co. Clare, Ireland. Numerous other international opportunities are available to students at Ohio Northern including studying in Cuba, South America and Europe. ONU is a member of the University Studies Abroad Consortium (USAC) which provides many study abroad and internship opportunities.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department.

 

Melissa M. Eddings-MancusoONU Professor Has Work Accepted in International Project
March
—Ohio Northern art professor, Melissa M. Eddings-Mancuso, has recently been accepted into the Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books Project (MIMB). She was one of 100 artists worldwide who was invited to MIMB, an exhibition that will travel to Spain, China, Argentina, Pakistan and Finland.

Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books Project is an exhibition that investigates the power of small-scale artists’ books. The books challenge readers with grand, powerful, urgent, and poignant content while the Project provides an intimate, economical, democratic and global exchange.

“I chose the words of Black Elk (Hehaka Sapa, 1863-1950),” explains Melissa, “a holy man of the Oglala Sioux Native Americans as the text and overall structure of the book. The pages, which are circles, are folded into fourths that form wedge shapes. These shapes provide the structure for the dome when the book is open. The dome provides a visual for Black Elks’ words:

Everything an Indian does
is in a circle,
and that is because the power of the world
always works in circles,
and everything tries to be round.
In the old days when we were a strong and happy people,
all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation, ?
and so long as the hoop was unbroken
the people flourished. . . . ?
Everything the Power of the World does
is done in a circle. . . .
Even the seasons form a great circle
in their changing,
and always come back again
to where they were.
The life of a man is a circle ?
from childhood to childhood
and so it is in everything where power moves.
Our teepees were round like the nests of birds,
and these were always
set in a circle,
the nation’s hoop,
a nest of many nests, where the Great Spirit
meant for us
to hatch our children.

The Project was curated by Hui-Chu Ying, an associate professor of art at the Myers School of Art, The University of Akron. The original exhibition opened at the Southern Graphics Council 2009 Annual Conference called Global Implications at Columbia College in March.

“As soon as the Southern Graphics Council announced the conference in Chicago,” said Hui-Chu, “I created this exhibition proposal for the SGC artists: Monumental Ideas in Miniature Books. I thought this could be the perfect project to suit the program at Columbia College and its Center for Book and Paper Arts.” Hui-Chu asked artists, primarily printmaking faculty, to create six or more editions of miniature books for the MIMB project.

Now the exhibit is traveling to more than 35 locations throughout the United States and to a few international sites. The Project is scheduled to exhibit at Ohio Northern’s Elzay Gallery of Art in 2010.

Melissa is an associate professor in art at Ohio Northern’s department of art & design. She received her MFA in painting from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and her BFA from Ohio University in 1992. She has taught at ONU since 1997, served as chair from 2000–2002, and currently teaches painting, printmaking and foundation courses in the department of art & design.

On campus, Melissa serves as the gallery director, the department’s study abroad coordinator and the adviser for the Student Art League. In addition, she is a member of the University’s Planning Council, the Committee on Professional Evaluation and has served on the Faculty Affairs and the Cultural Affairs and Special Events committees. For a few years, she served on the board of directors for ArtSpace in Lima, Ohio.

Melissa has been accepted to numerous juried shows including ArtSpace/Lima, the Findlay Art League, and the Ohio Art League. She also has had work on exhibit at Thiel College, Bluffton University, Ohio Northern University and Edinboro University.

image: Circle, typewriter on handmade paper, photocopy, ribbon; 2.5" x 2.5" x 2"

 

Joel SartoreAt Close Range: National Geographic Photographer To Speak
March—Joel Sartore, an internationally known photographer for National Geographic, will speak at Ohio Northern University on Wednesday, April 8:
• Wilson Art Center, room 121, at 2p.m.
• Freed Center for the Performing Arts at 7 p.m.

Both events are free and open to the public. Sartore’s main-stage presentation at the Freed Center is entitled “Witnessing to Warming” which blends humor with powerful conservation messages and award-winning wildlife photography.

Sartore has worked for National Geographic since 1991. Featured in more than 20 magazine articles, Sartore’s photographs have made a permanent mark on the places and animals he’s chronicled. He has covered grizzly bears in the Canadian Rockies and Yellowstone National Park; exotic wildlife in the Amazon rain forest; Brazil’s Pantanal, the world’s largest freshwater wetland; and Alaska’s North Slope, where big oil, wild creatures and native populations collide in the largest remaining U.S. wilderness. In addition to National Geographic, Sartore’s work has appeared in Audubon, Life, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, Time and the “Day in the Life” book series.

This event is part of Polar Bear Nation, a yearlong campaign to raise awareness of climate change and its effects on the polar bear.

Sartore grew up in Ralston, Nebraska, a small town just outside Omaha. It wasn’t until college, when he saw his first black-and-white image starting to appear in a developing tray in his makeshift darkroom (a dorm room closet at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln) that he grew interested in photography.

Though he made a few stops along the way (about six years worth) before signing on with National Geographic, the die had been cast.

National Geographic associate editor Dennis Dimick says, “From the very first time I ever met him, you could tell that there was a spark. This wasn’t just work. It was passion. It was calling.”

Of course, there’s always a down side.

“You have to be really patient,” says Sartore. “If I weren’t Type A and very obsessive-compulsive, there’s no way I’d do this. Most shoots I’m covered with bugs... Most of the time it’s physically miserable, and if you weren’t wound tight like me to get good pictures, why in the world would you ever do something like this? I don’t think you could stand it!”

He stands it because he does get good pictures—and even a few great ones from time to time.

“When you’re done and you look back on the things and you see the picture you’ve got, then that’s just killer. There’s nothing better.”

Sartore the Environmentalist
Although he argues that he’s not “a tree hugger,” Sartore says he has seen one debacle after another as traveling the world—from the disastrous effects of clear-cutting rainforests to the types of mining that poisons streams and kills fish.

Sartore is pessimistic. “If you think about the stuff I’m photographing, it’s mainly ghosts. It’s all ghosts,” says Sartore. “Just little remnants. Just little bitty pockets of wildlife. That’s all that’s left… I’m just photographing the last of everything. Whether it’s wolves or grizzly bears or rhinos, jaguars or parrots in South America. It’s the last of everything I’m photographing. It’s really kind of tragic.”

On the positive side of the ledger, occasionally he gets to strike a blow for the cause of the natural world and its endangered species. There was a widespread public outcry when his pictures taken in Madidi were published in the Spanish language version of National Geographic with the heading “Madidi, Will Bolivia Drown its Spectacular New National Park?”

See a short video about Joel Sartore's work.

 

Julie BrewerONU Student To Attend a Global Arts Conference
March
—Julie Brewer, an art education major at Ohio Northern University, will be attending the Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts sponsored by TransCultural Exchange, April 3–5, 2009.

Taking place in Boston, more than 60 representatives from around the world will learn about long- and short-term residency opportunities for artists, international art fairs and other global exhibition possibilities.

“I want to attend the conference to learn from and to interact with some of the most influential artists from around the world,” said Julie. “It will be an ideal professional development opportunity for me.”

Many people will come to Boston to meet, network and have work seen by the conference’s distinguished curators, critics and panelists. Julie also will get those opportunities, including a chance to present her own portfolio during one of the mentoring sessions taking place throughout the conference.

Other interesting sessions will include researching and applying for international residencies, teaching and working abroad, funding and government support, and art and social economic transformation. Presenters will represent many global organizations such as the Sanskriti Foundation in India, the Quartier Éphémère in Canada, the Bridge Guard–Art/Science Residence Center in Slovakia, the Fulbright Scholar Program, the Apothiki Foundation in Greece, the Baltic Art Center in Sweden and the Red Gate Gallery Residency Program in China. Participants also will get an opportunity to tour MIT’s art and architecture program, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Newbury Street galleries and the Massachusetts College of Art.

The Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts is the only forum that brings artists directly into contact with renowned international critics, curators and artist-in-residency directors to meet, network, share their work and hear about a vast array of programs for interacting with the world’s diverse cultures. The conference’s goal is to help artists expand their vision and experiences beyond their studio confines into the world at large, resulting in a newfound understanding that utilizes the one thing that transcends all boundaries to unite us all—the arts.

TransCultural Exchange is a non-profit organization whose mission is to foster a greater understanding of world cultures through high quality and innovative art exhibits, artist exchanges and related educational programming. Among U.S. arts organizations, TransCultural Exchange is unique. For two decades, TransCultural Exchange has been working directly with artists, arts organizations, foundations, museums and cultural centers in more than 60 countries staging award winning, critically acclaimed projects.

image: Julie Brewer teaching during an Ada Friends ceramic workshop held this spring.

 

Design CampYour Path to Becoming a Graphic Designer: Summer Honors Institute Begins Fifth Year at Ohio Northern
March—Looking for a career in the challenging and interesting graphic design industry? Here is your opportunity to take the first step and join a one-week intensive design camp at Ohio Northern University. The camp is being offered through the Summer Honors Institute program for gifted high school students who are entering their sophomore or junior years in the 2009–2010 academic year.

Design Camp will embark on an exciting journey to explore the fundamentals of visual communication. Working in teams, students will redesign a brand identity, including the logo, for a local non-profit organization through a combination of activities.

“We will be analyzing our client’s needs, conducting research, developing communication strategies, and planning, designing, and creating visual messages,” said Professor Brit Rowe, the instructor for the camp. “Through our research, I want students to determine the appropriate messages and the types of media for communicating those messages. Students will learn how a variety of visual elements and methods convey an identity, such as color, typeface, illustration and photography.”

Students will extend beyond discipline-specific boundaries to engage in a holistic design process that will broaden their perspective. Students will work together to understand the organization’s market, gather research on the identity, develop design critieria based on that research, develop alternative versions of a new identity, refine one version as the final design solution, and present a formal presentation of their design solution.

Rowe explains, “Morning sessions will be devoted to a series of short presentations and exercises intended to foster a sense of community and common purpose among students. And generally the afternoon sessions will be spent working in teams on the project that examines design and the value of design.”

Also, architecture, environmental design, landscape architecture, interior design and industrial design will be addressed during morning sessions to introduce students to the education, career paths and professional practices of other major design fields. “Design Camp will inform students about college study in design and will raise awareness of the impact of art and design through a series of weeklong activities,” said Rowe.

During last year’s Design SHI Camp, Rowe taught an interdisciplinary design course which focused on the design of the visual and physical presence of a section of the local village through initiating a strategy for urban renewal projects. “Every year we undertake a new challenge,” said Rowe. “So students can participate in multiple years.”

“Every year our camp participants say that one of the best aspects of Design Camp is our wonderful and energetic staff,” continued Rowe. “Our camp counselors are all undergraduate students at the Department of Art & Design. They are the best possible ambassadors for their design discipline and are eager to share their knowledge about design with camp participants.”

To be eligible to attend Ohio Northern University’s Summer Honors Institute and the Design Camp, a student must:
• Reside in Ohio;
• Be entering the 10th or 11th grade during the 2009-2010 school year;
• Be identified as gifted by an Ohio school district or be able to document that he or she meets Ohio gifted identification criteria described in Ohio Administrative Code 3301-51-15.

The Ohio Summer Honors Institutes are academic summer programs funded by the Ohio Department of Education. Through an ODE grant, Ohio Northern is able to offer many other camps, including the Design Camp.

The cost of ONU’s residential camp is $300 per week. A few scholarships are available for financial assistance to cover the camp fee. Space in the Summer Honors Institute is limited. Registration deadline is April 24. To register and for other detailed information regarding Ohio Northern’s Summer Honors Institute, visit the institute’s website.

 

Film series logoFilm Series Announced | Spring Quarter 2009
Power to the people! Documentary films for a small planet.
The Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design announces its Spring quarter film series. The film series was created to showcase the achievements of the film industry and to promote critical thinking and self-analysis. All members of the university community are invited to attend film showings.

Films are shown on Tuesdays at 6p.m. in room 115 of the Wilson Art Center located on Gilbert Street. Visitor parking is available at the McIntosh Center parking lot.

Garbage Warrior
March 17

If you ever thought, “I'm only one person. What kind of difference can I make?” then Michael Reynolds, the Garbage Warrior, is about to show you what just one individual can achieve.

Big Bucks Big Pharm
March 24

Pulls back the curtain on the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry to expose the insidious ways that illness is used, manipulated, and in some instances created, for capital gain.

King Corn
March 31

Two twenty-something guys grow and acre of corn in Iowa to get a glimpse of why corn is so dramatically overproduced that mountains of it sit next to full granaries and it has become the go-to cheap ingredient for processed food, fast food, and animal fodder.

Flow
April 14

An in-depth look into the troubling privatization and distribution of water on a world-wide scale and who has the right to decide what happens to this vital resource?

Kilowatt Our
April 21

This film brings home the impact of our energy use, asking the question, “Do you know where your electricity comes from?” Blood & Oil - Warns that unless we change direction, we stand to be drawn into one oil war after another as the global hunt for diminishing world petroleum supplies accelerates.

Coffee to Go
April 28

At the core of our ability to make change is how we decide to spend our dollars. This film shows how our decisions can potentially have drastic effects on poor farmers, their communities and the countries in which our coffee is grown. Plus - Wal-Mart: The True Cost of Low Prices & Trashed

Renewal
May 5

Faith-based groups on their journey to engage, learn and organize their congregations to be environmental stewards, shows people of all faiths working to re-define what it means to line on this planet.

 

Young Alumni Lecture Series LogoDid Someone Say Brain Food? The Young Alumni Lecture Series Feeds Students' Minds
March
—“Did Someone Say Brain Food?” is the theme of an alumni lecture series organized by the department of art & design at Ohio Northern University. Based on recommendations from the faculty, the lecture series brings to campus three or four young alumni to share personal career challenges and successes since graduation with current students.

The panel of alumni will discuss what it was like to send resumés and cover letters to employers and graduate schools, to have a portfolio reviewed in hopes of getting a job, and a personal perspective of the current job market.

Prof. Brit Rowe, department chair, acknowledges, “Students will be able to engage in an open dialogue with the speakers about the importance of specific classes and how the students might best position themselves for employment or graduate school. This is also a great opportunity for alumni to give back to the education process at Ohio Northern.”

The event is scheduled for Friday, March 27, 6p.m. at the Affinity Commons Building. The alumni lectures are free and open to the public. Campus parking is limited. Guests are encouraged to park in the University’s McIntosh Center/Visitors lot via College Avenue. For additional information, please contact the department of art & design at (419) 772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department.

 

The Graphic ImperativePower of the Poster: International Poster Exhibition Opens at Ohio Northern University
March—Posters make ideas for social change publicly visible and accessible by recording struggles for peace, justice and liberation from oppression for all peoples and the environment. These messages of anger, determination, courage and hope cross borders of time and place. They become crucial weapons in humanity’s fight for rights. Some have become icons that have changed the way we view our institutions, our world and ourselves.

The Graphic Imperative: International Posters for Peace, Social Justice and the Environment, 1965-2005, a traveling exhibition, is on view in the Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery from March 16–April 30, 2009 at Ohio Northern University. The Graphic Imperative showcases 121 strident and seductive works that have collaboratively come together from 40 years of design culture and history, representing 22 countries from around the world, all focusing on overwhelming global issues.

This exhibition of socio-political posters provides a window to an age of change, utilizing the power of visual metaphor and at times, savage irony and humor. Themes from the past four decades embodied in the exhibit include solidarity, liberation, racism, sexism, human rights, civil rights, environmental concerns, AIDS, war, literacy and tolerance. Noted in the show, French graphic designer Pierre Bernard, stated that, “The poster is the prime field for experimenting with visual language. It is the scene of changing ideas and aesthetics, of cultural, social, and political events.”

Curators Elizabeth Resnick and Chaz Maviyane-Davies of the Massachusetts College of Art and Philadelphia University’s Frank Baseman have selected the work, endeavoring to show the social, political and aesthetic concerns of many cultures in a single exhibition. The works chosen are conceptually strong yet have a direct message while embodying and reasserting the value of a particular way of imparting a point of view to the public. Hilary Jay, director of the Design Center at Philadelphia University states, “You look at a beautiful vase or sculpture, and you say, ‘It’s really pretty, but is there something bigger here?’ And these posters really do that.”

“Designers are taught to be master manipulators of visual language,” says Resnick. “As such, designers have a social and ethical responsibility to create and transmit meaningful forms of communication to benefit our society and culture. The Graphic Imperative exhibition is the physical embodiment of this design philosophy—yet its content is universally understood by all people.”

Many of the posters and images are direct and clever, raising questions about the methodology of visual advocacy. Several questions have been raised about the exhibition such as “Why posters? Why illustrations? Why photography? Why no text? Why only text?” The only way to answer these questions is to see the exhibition.

The public reception for The Graphic Imperative is Friday, April 24 from 5–7p.m. in the Elzay Gallery lobby at Ohio Northern University, Wilson Art Center, Gilbert Street. The essayists who contributed to the gallery guide will be introduced, thanked and presented a gift for their contribution to the gallery guide. They also will have an opportunity to share their opinions and talk about the issues these posters bring to the foreground. Elizabeth Resnick, The Graphic Imperative curator and 2007 AIGA Boston Fellow recipient, will then present a short lecture on visual advocacy in education and the curation of the exhibit followed by a question and answer session.

An 80-page color exhibition catalog is available for purchase at the Elzay Gallery of Art. Checks in the amount of $27 should be payable to Massachusetts College of Art. Also, the ONU gallery guide is available at the gallery free of charge. Essayist include Dr. Anne Lippert, vice president for academic affairs; Prof. Nils Ries, chair and professor of communication arts; Prof. Brit Rowe, chair and assistant professor of art & design; Dr. M.J. Zank, professor of music; Dr. Suzanne Morrison, associate professor of religion; Prof. Melissa Eddings-Mancuso, associate professor of art & design; and Prof. Raymond Schuck, visiting assistant professor of history and museum studies.

Admission to the Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery is free and open to the public, daily from noon to 5p.m. The Stambaugh Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For more information about the exhibition, visit www.TheGraphicImperative.org. To schedule a tour or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art & design at (419) 772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department.


Andrew SteingassOhio Northern Student Is Winner and a Finalist for AICUO Award
February
—Ohio Northern University student Andrew Steingass, a senior studio arts major from Ada, Ohio, was selected as a winner for the 2009 Excellence in Visual Arts Award from the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio (AICUO). He also was one of six finalists for the AICUO Grand Award. The students were chosen from a field of 21 students nominated from colleges and universities affiliated with the AICUO. Each member institution was allowed to nominate two seniors for the award.

The Excellence in Visual Arts award was created as an opportunity for AICUO institutions to recognize outstanding senior art majors who display outstanding range of work and maturity as an artist. The nominated students were judged in a first round by 11 art faculty. Six award winners were chosen to be evaluated by a second round of judges from Ohio’s arts community for selection of the Grand Award winner.

“I am extremely excited and surprised to have been chosen as a finalist,” said Andrew. “The faculty here at Ohio Northern has influenced my work and continue to push me in new directions.”

At a formal ceremony to be held in April, the Grand Award winner will be announced and presented $2500. The People’s Choice Award also will be distributed based on the most popular votes taken from an online public voting event. In addition to Andrew, ONU senior Stephanie Rader, from Mount Cory, Ohio, will participate in this competition.

About his portfolio submitted to the AICUO competition, Andrew continued, “I found interest in clay because of its unlimited potential for form and surface and the physicality of wheel throwing. Formerly an athlete and performing artist, I adapted well to techniques of clay because they too require a strenuous physical and mental discipline. Plastic clay was much a recorder of a performance as much as it was a solid and enduring building material.”

“I am primarily interested in how, as humans, our sensual perception translates to desire,” said Andrew. “How the psychological effects of form, surface, and color develop our sense of what we value. It is different for everyone. These things shape our identity and our reality.”

After graduation, Andrew will continue his education. He has plans to move to North Carolina and apply to Penland School of Crafts. Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, Penland is a national center for ceramic and crafts education. According to Andrew, “The school is well known in our discipline and offers a lot of opportunities.”

The Excellence in Visual Arts Award recognizes seniors who have been nominated by their department chair or dean. These seniors possess and demonstrate artistic excellence over the span of their four years of study at their colleges.

AICUO was organized in 1969 to represent the interests of its members to Ohio's lawmakers, regulators and citizens. AICUO seeks to strengthen student financial aid programs and bring about a greater understanding of the impact and contributions of Ohio independent colleges and universities. For more information about the AICUO Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts, visit www.aicuoartaward.com.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Katelyn AmendolaraStudent Design Major Puts “Mind To Work”
February
—Ohio Northern University graphic design major Katelyn Amendolara, a sophomore from Canfield, Ohio, presented at Heidelberg’s 16th annual Minds at Work Student Research Conference on Feb. 19. A scholarly event, the conference opened its doors to students from regional colleges and universities to present research projects on a wide variety of subjects.

Katelyn’s research project, called “Design for Social Change: Can Design Improve a University’s Recycle Plan?,” addressed whether designers can create services and innovative solutions to improve Ohio Northern’s recycling plan. The research also investigated how ideas of sustainability can be applied to the university community’s interactions with its physical environment. By examining the research data, it became clear that it was possible to increase recycling participation by students and staff; to heighten awareness of the university’s recycling program; to lower waste generated on-campus by reducing, reusing and recycling; and to organize a program successfully so it can be repeated and possibly expanded each year on campus.

“I began to focus on the current state of recycling at Ohio Northern University,” said Katelyn. “I utilized different research methods to help me define the problem, to gain valuable information, and to assess the student body’s view. My research findings ultimately led me to apply design to create original solutions.”

The design research project stemmed from an introductory visual communication class taught by Prof. Brit Rowe. “Research helped us to understand and interpret our natural and human-made environment,” said Rowe. “My objective was to teach students that good design work begins with thoughtful research. By engaging students in various research methods, they learned to bring solutions to the table that reflected a commercial value beyond a well-crafted logo, brochure or product. By thoroughly researching the design problems, goals and audience, the students created stronger and more appropriate, innovative solutions that delivered true value to the campus community.”

Katelyn’s research project did produce ideas of how sustainability through design can be applied to a community’s interactions, its economics and its physical environment. Her innovative solutions and proposals have the potential to create a more sustainable environment at Ohio Northern University. It can also create more advocacies towards going green. From examining the research data, it is possible to heighten awareness by students and staff, and lower the amount of waste generated on campus. “Hopefully, my proposals and ideas,” says Katelyn, “will be repeated and installed in the community and possibly expanded each year on campus. If the student body and faculty at Ohio Northern are taking the time to recycle during their daily routine, then our home and environment in which we live can prosper.”

The Minds at Work Student Research Conference aspired to increase student interest and knowledge concerning academic research and scholarship, to recognize, honor, and reward academic excellence and to give students an opportunity to experience the conference format of academic inquiry. According to Rowe, the conference was an excellent opportunity for students “to improve their critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills in a professional setting.

“One of the underlying principles of our design program centers around design thinking,” continued Rowe. “Students graduating from our program must be able to think holistically. We teach that design is a process for practical and creative solutions that adds value.”

ONU offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Stephanie RaderOhio Northern student awarded third place in national scholarship competition
February—
Ohio Northern University senior Stephanie Rader was recently awarded third place in the prestigious Kappa Pi International Art Honorary scholarship competition.

Stephanie, who is majoring in art/art education, submitted a portfolio containing five works to a selection committee at the national office in Mississippi.

A native of Mt. Cory, Ohio, Stephanie is proud to have been chosen for the award. “I create artwork to be an educational, inspirational, or engaging fusion of imagery and story. I always loved children’s books for their combination of images and text. In my artistic process, the concept behind each piece greatly influences its visual design. When I begin working, I first create a narrative about the work’s message.”

As a graduating senior, Stephanie is working on a thesis project that focuses on her interest in art education. “My work is primarily geared for and inspired by children. For inspiration, I try to view the world with the wonder of a child. I value how Picasso and Cézanne look at simple subjects and deconstruct their components to view them in different ways. However, my fascination for the quaint goes in a different direction. I my drawings, I try to capture an intense focus on details that can be easily overlooked.”

The Kappa Pi International Art scholarship is open to any undergraduate member of Kappa Pi. Founded in 1911, Kappa Pi is an international art honor society for students with outstanding academic achievement and artistic excellence. As an organization at ONU, Kappa Pi promotes greater interest in the knowledge and appreciation of art, and organizes many activities throughout the year such as the annual art sale, department parties, weekend museum trips, and the Honors Day initiation and picnic.

 

Portfolio Scholarship DayA&D Announces Portfolio Scholarship Day on Feb. 14
February
—The department of art & design at Ohio Northern University invites all prospective students to participate in our annual Portfolio Scholarship Day at the Wilson Art Center. This is an exciting opportunity to compete for a Talent Award based solely on a submitted portfolio.

Portfolio Scholarship Day is scheduled for Sat., Feb. 14, 2009, beginning at 9a.m. The day includes portfolio critique sessions, drawing sessions, and lunch on campus. Once students and families make their reservations, a complete itinerary will be emailed with specific times for scheduled activities.

Register today!
To reserve a place for the 2009 portfolio review, please contact the A&D department at 419.772.2160 or by email at art@onu.edu.

Not able to attend?
If students are not able to attend the Portfolio Scholarship Day, but would like their work included in the evaluation process for admission and for a Talent Award, applicants may submit portfolios three ways.

On campus: Students can reschedule appointments by contacting the department of A&D (art@onu.edu or 419.772.2160). The portfolio review committee can meet with students to evaluate portfolios Monday through Friday, 8a.m.–4p.m.

By mail: Students can submit work in digital or slide format. Students should include an inventory sheet with their files/slides noting the size, medium or media, and completion date of each piece of work. Work in a digital format must not require installation of software on a department computer. Portfolios should be sent to the Department of Art & Design, Ohio Northern University, 525 S. Main Street, Ada, Ohio 45810.

By web site: Another option allows students to submit portfolios by emailing the url for their web site to art@onu.edu.

Get Here!
We hope students take advantage of this opportunity to complete their admission application and earn a Talent Award scholarship. Directions to campus may be found here on Ohio Northern’s web page. For any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact the department of art & design (art@onu.edu, 419.772.2160).

About Talent Awards
To qualify for a Talent Award, students must have already applied and have been accepted to Ohio Northern University as an art or design major. Talent awards are coordinated with other University grants and scholarships. Students may contact the admissions office for an application (1.888.408.4ONU).

Our Evidence of Excellence
The Ohio Northern community is committed to the pursuit of excellence and welcomes applicants who have the same high standards and ambitions. Our department maintains a selective admission policy, accounting for a student body that is enthusiastic about our programs of study.
• Named as one of the top 200 programs in the nation for creative students in Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers (2008)
• Ranked No. 2 among baccalaureate colleges in the Midwest in U.S. News & World Report, Best Colleges in America (2009)
• One of the Best 368 Colleges, Princeton Review (2009)
• Among the top 100 private four-year colleges and small universities in Peterson’s Competitive College Guide (2008)
• Named in Colleges of Distinction (2009); a guide profiling America’s most distinguished teaching-centered colleges and universities

About the department of art & design
The department of A&D offers the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in studio arts, graphic design, advertising design, and art education. ONU students can pursue careers in graphic design, corporate identity, advertising, wayfinding design, publication design, illustration, web design, exhibit design and curating, art therapy, art education and many other fields.

The department holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs in the country.

The department is housed in the Wilson Art Center, a state-of-the art facility with up-to-date studios, classrooms, and computer lab. The Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery feature an ambitious exhibit season and visiting artist program. Each year students gain practical experiences through internships, exhibitions, student teaching, study abroad, workshops, conferences and practicums that provide hands-on learning. The department also offers students engagement in a number of student organizations, including pre-professional groups, domestic study opportunities, a film series and summer European trips.

We encourage potential students, as well as art teachers, guidance counselors and parents to visit our beautiful campus. Student-led tours and individual appointments with admissions counselors, financial aid counselors and faculty are available by appointment. Please contact the admissions office or the department of art & design for further information and for Portfolio Scholarship Day reservations (art@onu.edu, 419.772.2160).

 

SMarts ProgramSMArts Program Links ONU Students to Community
Morgan Baughman
January — Two years ago, Ohio Northern University professor Linda Lehman founded the Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) program benefiting Ohio Northern students as well as local elementary students. The program was also designed to connect the University and the departments of art & design and education to the surrounding community.

Now, in its third year, the program continues to flourish. Beginning the fourth Saturday in January, 15 teacher candidates from Ohio Northern will implement lesson plans they have created. The 58 participating children will receive an opportunity to learn about art, an often neglected subject in today’s classrooms, while the college students will receive hands-on teaching experience.

To junior art education major Kelsey Schrock, from Perrysburg, Ohio, the advantages of this program are evident: “I think that SMArts is a great program both for local elementary school students, who enjoy art and want to get more experience outside the regular school week, as well as for students majoring in education.”

Senior art education major Stephanie Rader, from Mt. Cory, Ohio, echoes Kelsey: “It is an amazing opportunity for elementary and university students. They’re learning about art, which really boils down to critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. We’re learning the same things, but in the context of preparing lessons, like a teacher would. It’s practical experience for us, and it’s especially nice to be working with your peers while you learn. I’m acquiring many new strategies for room management, lesson planning and all sorts of things just by watching how they and I handle different situations.”

The future teachers receiving practice are of various experience levels. Stephanie, for example, has a long list of teaching history, while Kelsey has had much less. She says, “I don’t really know what to expect. However, I think I’ll be really impressed with the students’ participation and their understanding of different subjects we’ll talk about.”

Projects on this year’s SMArts syllabus correlate with other school subjects like science, history, and math, showing how art can be integrated into most every issue. “By their very nature, art and design disciplines are excellent educational tools to teach creative thinking,” says Prof. Brit Rowe, chair of the art & design department at Ohio Northern. “Students have to search for the right answers through hands-on assignments, not just text books. We have to encourage students to see the interconnections between subjects.”

There is no doubt that SMArts is a worthwhile endeavor. Linda says that after the past two years’ program, “we received a great deal of positive feedback with many parents asking us to repeat the program.” Response was so tremendous that 120 students applied for the fifty-eight slots offered by SMArts.

Participating in the program for another year, Stephanie emphasizes the value of the course, saying “What I enjoy most is being there with the kids. It’s so neat to be able to ask them questions to find out what they know, then to provide them with a bridge of new information that they can understand and apply. When it just clicks with them, and they understand, it’s gratifying.”

 

SACI sculpture gardenStudents’ Studies Lead Them Abroad
January 2009

An understanding of a culture or region of the world other than one's own is an important part of a professional and liberal arts education at Ohio Northern. It’s also a key to developing leaders in an increasingly interdependent global society. The study abroad program in the department of art & design is designed to provide a range of opportunities for qualified students to study in Europe or elsewhere.

The chance to study abroad offers students endless rewards. The art & design department encourages its students to take advantage of this fantastic opportunity to learn. The department’s study abroad coordinator, Prof. Melissa Eddings says, “Art majors should consider studying abroad to broaden art and design experiences, gain greater global understanding, and develop independence and self discipline. Our studio arts program requires students to study abroad.”

Starting this term, three ONU art & design students will be studying at the Studio Arts Center International (SACI) in Florence, Italy.

“Orientation begins on January 7 at SACI,” says Emily Jay, a studio arts major from Powell, Ohio. “When our flight arrives in Florence, we meet with a SACI representative, be given housing information and keys, and then get a taxi to our apartments.” The following days include a variety of sessions about SACI, Italian culture and customs, and tours of facilities.

Classes at SACI begin on Monday, January 12. Students are able to take a variety of courses in art history, fine arts and design, museology, conservation, history of Italian opera and cinema, creative writing and Italian. “As usual,” says Emily, “I’m second guessing myself. I’m already registered for classes, but I’m thinking I should change my schedule. Like, maybe I should take advanced painting instead of intermediate. And maybe I should take digital multimedia instead of writing. And maybe I should take Renaissance literature instead of video. There’s a lot of tough choices to make!”

Junior studio arts major Katy MacNaughton from Delaware, Ohio, was excited when her visa arrived in the mail. “It was one more step closer to the end of this crazy waiting game. With the end of the quarter and our departure only days away, excitement has become a permanent sort of feeling.”

Emily, Katy and JoeKaty was also overwhelmed by the heartfelt support from her peers. During finals week at ONU, art & design students organized a going away party for the three “new Florentine students.” “Thanks to everyone for the wonderful surprise party! I was so surprised and very grateful,” said Katy. “It was a little sad to have said goodbye to everyone for a full semester. I will miss everyone!”

Joe Stevenson, an art education major from Elida, Ohio, echoed the same sentiments. “It was really nice of everyone to have a surprise going away party for the three of us! We were in good company at the Wilson Art Center for sure.”

He is also looking forward to the journey to Florence. “I want to be challenged in my artistic abilities by renowned artists and also by other students who are at the top of their class in ability,” said Joe. Only 100 students, from around the world, are accepted to SACI each semester.

Emily is expecting this experience to have a profound influence on her life. “One of the most exciting things about going to study in Florence,” says Emily, “is that Florence is where the rebirth of art took place, and I hope that by going there I myself can have a rebirth of sorts. I know this trip will push my art in a new direction, hopefully helping me to find the direction and confidence I need to move forward after college.”

During the past few years, several art students grabbed the opportunity to live and learn in a foreign country. Melissa Becker, a 2005 graduate, traveled to Florence, Italy during the summer of 2004. While in Florence, Melissa attended the Lorenzo de Medici School. A 2007 graduate, Abigail Mosbarger studied at SACI. She adventured to Florence during the winter and spring quarters of 2006.

At SACI, Abigail took an intensive Italian class, an advanced sculpture class, a Batik class, and a marble carving class. She claimed that the marble carving class was her favorite. “We actually obtained the marble by climbing the marble mountains up in Carrara and Pietrasanta. These exact mountains are where all the best carvers in the world come to get their highest quality of marble and also where historic greats like Michelangelo Buonarroti quarried their marble for famous statues like David,” said Abigail.

She also encourages others to study abroad. “I believe that every single person should study abroad. This experience will benefit their lives in numerous ways. There are hundreds of countries; so, pick the one that interests you and live there!” she said. Abigail is currently an art teacher in the Austin, Texas area.

Emily can’t agree more. “I also know that this trip will make me a stronger and more independent person. I’m moving into a country where I don't speak the language, let alone the fact that there are some serious cultural differences that I will have to adjust to. I'm looking forward to these challenges, though, and I look forward to see how they shape and change me.”

Art & Design studentsTo keep in contact, the three ONU students have started a blog called We Dream in Italian. “This has been quite an involved process,” said Emily. “We started this blog to allow us to share our experiences with our friends, professors and our families. There isn’t much on it yet. But, as we get situated in Florence, there will be much more. So, check it out for pictures and stories of what we’re doing!”

The Web address for the students’ blog can be found at http://dream-in-italian.blogspot.com/

“This is an exciting and valuable experience for our students,” says Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design. “This kind of opportunity provides them an experience that turns the entire world into a dynamic classroom.”

Ohio Northern is dedicated to giving students the chance not only to deepen their knowledge in their chosen career field but also to broaden their world view by adding a global perspective.

The department of art & design has a specific cooperative art exchange agreement with the University of Ulster in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The University also has agreements with the Studio Art Centers International in Florence, Italy, and the Burren School of Art in County Clare, Ireland. ONU is a member of the University Studies Abroad Consortium (USAC), which provides many other study abroad and internship opportunities.

ONU offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

David HerringOhio Northern Student Wins First Place in Photography Exhibit
January
—David Herring, a senior art/graphic design major at Ohio Northern University, recently won first place and earned an honorable mention in the black and white category during the ArtSpace/Lima Photography Club Juried Photography Exhibition. The show was held at the ArtSpace gallery from January 9–February 21 in Lima, Ohio.

Dave won first place for his black and white photograph called “Grain Elevator” and also was awarded an honorable mention for “Ada Theatre Reflections” in the same category.

Professor Lynn Whitney, a photography instructor at BGSU, served as one of the jurors for the show. She said, “It was wonderful to see such extraordinary variety in the images as well as feel the enthusiasm so many of the artists have for the photographic process. With nearly 200 pieces to consider, our selection process focused upon those with the most coherence in composition and craft. We were drawn especially to images whose presentation, often understated, quietly complimented the work.”

The jurors selected 99 works from 194 photographic entries that were submitted by 43 photographers. The juried exhibit represented the work of 34 area artists that included Dave Herring.

Whitney went on to say, “There was so much to celebrate here. The efforts from all the participants to best represent the worlds they know and love did not go unnoticed by either of us! We did our very best to honor this. We gathered together a group of work that will proudly show in Art Space as well as highlight the strength of the photographic eye of Lima and its surrounding region.”

ArtSpace/Lima is a not-for-profit arts organization with a mission to promote the arts in northwest Ohio and to provide artists with a venue to present and to sell their work. Art/Space is supported in part by a generous grant from the Ohio Arts Council. For further information on the annual juried photography exhibit or for information regarding other ArtSpace programs, visit ArtSpace or call 419.222.1721.

ONU offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Grain Elevator, by David Herring

 

Environmental Visions Opens at Ohio Northern
January 2009

To correspond with the celebration of a campus-wide awareness campaign, “Polar Bear Nation,” the Ohio Northern University gallery program hosts a group exhibition called “Environmental Visions.” This select group of artists and designers shares views about our environment and the challenges we face as stewards of our land, air and water. The featured artists include Kelly Adams; Bob Barancik; Koriel Jock; Lucia LaVilla-Havelin; Susan Strong Muir; Shelly Murney; Patricia Tinajero; and Jing Zhou. The exhibit is on display January 5 through February 20 at the Elzay and Stambaugh Studio Theatre galleries.

The show is curated by Prof. Melissa Eddings, gallery director and associate professor in the art & design department. “This initiative provides a unique opportunity,” says Melissa, “for our community to see and discuss issues which artists have addressed in their work. In many ways, the exhibit highlights a major theme that has relevance to all of us. With many environmental issues already facing our country and the world, it is important that our students continue to educate themselves and others about these issues.”

Global Warming PosterOne participating artist and designer featured in the exhibit is Jing Zhou, a professor at Monmouth University. Born in Chongqing, China, Jing is a prolific interdisciplinary artist and versatile graphic designer. Her award winning artwork has been widely shown and collected nationwide and abroad, such as Best of Show and Achievement Award from national juried art exhibitions, SIGGRAPH Art Gallery Exhibition, Horizon Interactive Awards, Lucie International Photography Awards, permanent collection of the WRO Media Art Center in Poland, the Museum of the Living Artist/San Diego Art Institute, etc. Numerous books and magazines, such as Computer Graphics World, have published her work. Jing is also a Gold Medal recipient of the Art Directors Club of New Jersey, Silver winner of the Summit International Creative Awards, and winner of the American Corporate Identity 23 Design Competition. Her clients include international organizations such as Greenpeace.

Jing explains, “My artistic creations reflect my interest in spiritual experiences, and Eastern and Western art, literature, and philosophy. To me, creating art is a process of expressing my nature via being human.”

Jing’s goal in one of her posters, Using Energy Efficiency To Fight Global Warming, is to alert people about global warming and reveal the causes of global warming. “The concept of this poster has incorporated five visual elements: a thermometer, a map of the world, icons of industrial activities, scientific data of global warming, and the poster’s title,” explains Jing. “After carefully combining them, I’ve created a simple, yet eloquent voice in this poster about global warming and the importance of energy efficiency.”

Also involved in the exhibit is Patricia Tinajero, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Patricia earned her BFA in sculpture and drawing from Florida State University and her MFA in sculpture from the University of Colorado-Boulder. She has earned solo and collaborative exhibitions at the Lexington Art League, the Espaço Arte-Instalação do SESC-Bosque in Brazil, Islip Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center to highlight a few. Her work also has been accepted at the Essex Art Center in Massachusetts, Nature Art Gallery in New York, Project X in California, Urban Centre for Contemporary Art in Michigan, LMACK Project in Germany, and the Eco-cycle in Colorado.

In general says Patricia, “My work explores object and space, in terms of class structure and cultural construction, in the context of everyday domestic environments. Household items, particularly everyday objects, serve to create domestic landscape... I catalogue and archive collected everyday materials to connect with environmental values concerning time, space, and memory, exploring the shift between two-dimensional and three-dimensional spaces, as well as places to put the work on the in-between in order to contrast presence and representation, in both spatial and pictorial manifestations.”

About her work, Patricia explains, “I have spent time with other artists in the Amazon basin. We left dismayed at the effect of the introduction of plastic and non-biodegradable materials into the Amazon… where they do not have a trash collection infrastructure... The ecological concerns [in my work] are timely and urgent. The piece is meant to raise awareness about our role as consumers in an ecosystem composed by producers, consumers and degraders. The life support systems that allow life on Earth are quickly being degraded by human’s actions.”

Chair of the department of art & design at Ohio Northern, Prof. Brit Rowe states, “As artists and designers in our society, we have powerful means to work in many media to effectively mobilize public opinion and the positioning of critical issues of our time, like environmental issues. This exhibit showcases that point.”

A reception will be held Friday, January 9, 5–7p.m. at the Elzay Gallery of Art. Admission to the Stambaugh Gallery is free and open to the public, daily from noon from 5 p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For additional information, to schedule a tour or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art and design (419) 772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

Creative Colleges GuideDepartment of Art & Design Ranked Among the Top 200 Creative Programs in the Nation
ADA – Ohio Northern’s department of art & design has been named as one of the top 200 programs in the nation for creative students.

Written by Elaina Loveland, Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers (second edition) is aimed at college-bound creative students, giving them the information and resources necessary for picking the right programs. This step-by-step guide to getting into college includes helpful tips about auditions, admission essays, artistic résumés and portfolios, the SAT and ACT, and financial aid. Students can see real-life profiles of students in each discipline and find answers to frequently asked questions.

Loveland meticulously researched programs from across the country before selecting the final 200. Dr. Lisa G. Robeson, interim dean of the Getty College of Arts and Sciences, attributes ONU's inclusion to the caliber of performances the University hosts each year, and the opportunities for students to showcase their talent.

“We are really pleased that the department of art & design has been selected for inclusion in Creative Colleges,” said Robeson. “I think our arts scholarships, the many visiting professional artists who do workshops here, and our opportunities to get students into juried competitions have really made a difference.”

The department is housed in the Wilson Art Center, a state-of-the art facility with up-to-date studios and classrooms for fine arts and design. The Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery feature an ambitious exhibit season and visiting artist program. The department also features a number of student organizations, workshops, a film series, study abroad opportunities, experiential learning opportunities, summer European trips, and student exhibits.

“We are honored that our program is included as a top program in the country by Loveland. She provides college-bound students a lot of information on many top quality programs across the nation,” said department chair Brit Rowe. “Our art and design program offers students an engaging, comprehensive education combining professional training and a broad study of the liberal arts. Our students learn to become effective artists, designers or teachers in a contemporary society. We are thrilled to be listed in the publication.”

 

Holiday greeting cardsHoliday Greeting Cards on display at the Elzay Gallery Lobby
December
— While the holiday season brings many blessings, for many it’s also the time of year to send greeting cards. A collection of Christmas and holiday cards currently is on display in the lobby of the Elzay Gallery of Art at Ohio Northern Dec. 8–19.

The exhibit contains about a hundred cards, mostly from American mass culture. But a few displays feature holiday cards from other countries, famous charities and other organizations.

“Like with so many other artifacts, holiday greeting cards can certainly reflect a given culture,” said Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design. “Cards can reflect collective interests, personal decorative and aesthetic tastes, social aspirations and beliefs.”

Also included in the exhibit are illustrations and printing techniques. “Many of the cards use foil stamping, debossing, embossing and many other printing and finishing techniques,” said Rowe.

The Elzay Gallery lobby is open from 8a.m.-5p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1-5p.m. Sunday. For additional information, please contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

 

Film Series Announced
Winter Quarter 2008–09

The Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design announces its Winter quarter film series. The series focuses on the lives people as they “endure the forces of nature.”

The film series was created to showcase the achievements of the film industry and to promote critical thinking and self-analysis. All members of the university community are invited to attend film showings.

Films are shown at 6p.m. in room 115 of the Wilson Art Center located on Gilbert Street.

Soylent Green
Dec. 16

Depicts a future in which overpopulation leads to depleted resources
on Earth. This leads to widespread unemployment and poverty.

Delicatessen
Jan. 13

Set in the indeterminate future, in a post-apocalyptic
apartment building, the story centers around the tenants of the
apartment and their desperate bids to survive. Among these characters
is a newly arrived tenant, who arrives to replace a tenant whose reason
for departure is initially unclear.

Logan's Run
Jan. 27

In a 23rd-century world of pleasure and perfection, Logan’s job
is to kill anyone past the age of 30. But when his turn for
sacrifice comes (at age 30), he decides to flee the bubble-domed
paradise and find a mythical “sanctuary” that lies outside.

On the Beach
Feb. 10

After a mysterious nuclear war, most of the world has been
wiped out but for Australia. A US submarine, commandeered
by Peck, surfaces only to be shocked by the apocalypse. With a black
radioactive cloud fast approaching the only surviving continent, the
survivors make serious introspection into their lives as they await
their fates.

 

 

Reduce Reuse PosterFrom Trash to Beauty: Exhibit reveals first-year students’ projects
November—As part of a first-year seminar course in the department of art & design, students at Ohio Northern University were charged to invent a creative way to reuse something or invent a device or object that used waste in a meaningful way.

“Our students were engaged in a thoughtful, community-based response to sustainability and community,” said Professor Brit Rowe who taught the course. “We believe it is important to instill environmental thinking into the art and design process early on, making it an automatic consideration in the students’ career.”

Students were encouraged to investigate what local businesses throw away, what their neighbors throw away and what they throw away. The answers to these questions became the material for the students’ projects.

“Students were really encouraged to think about the entire process of creating,” said Rowe. The students’ projects were evaluated using specific criteria, such as: Is this artifact useful? How might this encourage people to use waste, to reduce waste and/or to consume less? How might the object stimulate thought, dialog and action? “We wanted students to realize that their work can be seen as a way to emphasize the value of art and design by doing something valuable for/to the community,” said Rowe.

Students were able to create fun, attractive and useful objects such as a table light, a side table, and picture frames. Student reactions were very positive. “I never thought about my work in this way,” said Andrew Adams from Hudson, “until we were challenged with this project. I think we were all excited to see what each other created. People designed some clever objects.”

The project and exhibition is in recognition of the University's Year of the Polar Bear, a University initiative to raise awareness for the threats to polar bears due to climate change in the Arctic. The exhibit, called Reuse/Reduce, is on display in the Wilson Art Center through December 19, 2008 and is free and open to the public. Building hours are Mondays through Saturdays, 8a.m.–5p.m. and Sundays 1–5p.m. The Wilson Art Center is located on Gilbert Street on the Ohio Northern University campus.

The Ohio Northern department of art & design offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

Toledo MuseumONU Professor Accepted into “Artist Who Teach” Exhibit
November—Ohio Northern Professor Linda Lehman, visiting assistant to the director of the Center for Teacher Education, has two paintings accepted for exhibit as part of the “Artists Who Teach” exhibit in the Graphic Arts Gallery of the Toledo Museum of Art. The exhibit is now on display through Nov. 23 with a reception for the artists on Nov. 23 beginning at noon.

This exhibition features works from a variety of media, showcasing the creativity and dedication of art teachers in Ohio. Artists Who Teach is organized by the Ohio Art Education Association.

Prof. Lehman is a former public school classroom and art teacher. While at Ohio Northern, she began an innovative Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) program for ONU education students and children from surrounding school districts. She teaches the art education courses in the department of art & design.

The Toledo Museum of Art is a privately endowed, nonprofit arts institution. Admission to the Museum is free. The Museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 10a.m. – 4p.m.; Friday, 10a.m. – 10p.m.; Saturday, 10a.m. – 6p.m.; Sunday, noon – 6p.m.; but closed Mondays and major holidays.

The Museum is located at 2445 Monroe Street at Scottwood Avenue, just west of the downtown business district and one block off I-75 with exit designations posted. For general information, visitors can call 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, or visit www.toledomuseum.org.

ONU offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University's 2008-09 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Student Juried Exhibit Honors Undergraduates During Awards Reception
November—The Annual Student Juried Exhibit opened this month at the Elzay Gallery of Art on the beautiful campus of Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio. The show runs through Dec. 17.

A wide range of medium, style and subject matter is represented. This year's show was very competitive, says Associate Professor of Art and Gallery Director Melissa Eddings. More than 45 student artists and designers submitted over 120 entries to the jurors, Anne Beekman and Valerie Excobedo, both art professors at the University of Findlay.

Awards were presented during the opening awards reception honoring both the artists, designers, and the jurors on Nov. 4. Awards were presented to the students in the following categories:

Juried Show 2008-09Best of Show: Emily Jay

Graphic Design
First Place: Margaret Schmidt
Second Place: Arnaldo Jimenez
Third Place: Lauren Bailey

Two-Dimensional
First Place: Jeff Gibbons
Second Place: Chris Gaghan
Third Place: Lindsey McClish

Three-Dimensional
First Place: Andrew Steingass

The Annual Student Juried Exhibit is held to recognize the best in studio art and graphic design produced within the Department of Art & Design throughout the academic year. The competition is designed where respected and qualified outside jurors come in to evaluate the work for originality, creativity, and technical execution.

Juror Valerie Excobedo briefly discussed her selections. "In spite of the diversity of artistic expression in a contemporary society," said Excobedo, "I still believe that craftsmanship is crucial, so technical proficiency is taken into consideration. I also consider the effective use of materials, the content of the work, the clarity of communication, the presentation and the understanding of visual quality. I look for work that engages me, that touches my emotions and my intellect. All of this comes into play when dealing with a public presentation.

"Overall," Excobedo continued, "I felt all the work had merit and I was impressed with what I saw being produced at ONU. I tried, and hopefully succeeded, in highlighting the best and most stimulating of all the submissions."

Admission to the Elzay Gallery of Art is free and open to the public, daily from noon - 5p.m. For additional information about the University's 2008-09 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the Department of Art & Design at 419-772-2160.

 

James DeVoreProfessor Emeritus in Group Show
November
—The gentlemen have the floor (or, more accurately, the walls) at Artworks Around Town in Wheeling, W.V. for the month of November.

The Gallery Hop to be held in the historic Centre Market, 2200 Market St., from 5-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7, will introduce three well-known Ohio artists, including Prof. James DeVore, in the Studio Gallery space.

DeVore, now a resident of New Albany, Ohio, decided in the first grade that he might be an artist when his teacher praised his Thanksgiving pilgrim drawing. Through his school years, he had some private drawing instruction and worked and studied on his own. He copied from cartoon books. Recalling those early days, he said, “I thought that one day I might work for Walt Disney since I could render Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck very realistically.”

More serious studies were undertaken at Ohio University where he received Bachelor and Master of Fine Arts degrees and then embarked upon a 37-year career in art education in the Ohio public school system, at Bloomsburg (Pa.) University and at Ohio Northern University where he retired in 1997 as professor of art emeritus.

Retirement has allowed DeVore to paint full-time using both watercolor and oil media. His most recent interest is in plein air (outdoor) painting which requires the artist to work in all kinds of weather conditions.

Speaking of his work, DeVore said, “I have a great feeling for nature and prefer landscape as a subject to painting figures or still life. I have always been attracted to atmosphere in landscape and especially to the lower key values in colors; old buildings, rain, reflections on wet pavements and winter scenes seem especially suited to the watercolor medium. I do not, however, feel confined to visual reality. I seem to have a romantic mind with the eye of a realist. This means that I will add or subtract details in a landscape for the sake of trying to evoke an emotion. I am very aware and affected by my environment and always have been. Most of my work is the result of influences upon my life from places I have lived and remembered.”

DeVore’s work has been exhibited on a regional, state and international level at the Canton Art Institute; Dayton Art Institute; Mansfield Art Center; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Cain Gallery, Chicago, and the ADI Galleries of San Francisco and Tokyo, Japan. He is the author of several articles in national art publications and the subject of an article on his life and work in “Prize Winning Graphics.” He is a member of the Central Ohio Watercolor Society and the Ohio Watercolor Society where he has served as recording secretary and as a member of the board of trustees.

image: Path to the River, watercolor, 2006, 11x15

 

Veiled PlanetVeiled Reality Opens at Ohio Northern
November—The department of art & design is pleased to present a new exhibition featuring new ink paintings on paper by emerging artist Linda Lee Nicholas. Veiled Reality, on display November 4 through December 17 at the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery, speaks of a world that has been uncovered, layered, magnified or reinvented.

The Pod on Paper series is a commentary on how the changing world is affecting our bodies and the environment. The subjects of tainted food and water supplies, global warming and shrinking living spaces all intermingle with Nicholas’ painterly style.

Fluid, organic shapes move across the paper revealing forms at once beautiful and playful, making you forget the serious subject matter the artist is dealing with. Clumps of color and diaphanous layers reveal abstract bodily interiors and soft architectural environments with a Dr. Seussian fantasy world flair.

Ms. Nicholas is a graduate of The School of Visual Arts in New York City and has exhibited extensively throughout the United States. Her exhibition at ONU is in recognition of the University's Year of the Polar Bear, a University initiative to raise awareness for the threats to polar bears due to climate change in the Arctic.

A reception for the artist will be held Friday, November 7, 3–5p.m. at the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery. Admission to the Stambaugh Gallery is free and open to the public, daily from noon from 5 p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For additional information, to schedule a tour or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art and design (419) 772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

ONU with designer Chip KiddDesign Students Attend GAIN Conference
October 2008

Five Ohio Northern design students accompanied Professor Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design, to the GAIN: AIGA Business and Design Conference in New York City. The three-day conference featured main-stage presentations by the industry’s most successful designers, business leaders, researchers and other professionals on such topics such as Design for Democracy, Target’s in-house design office, Saturn’s retail strategies, the user experience at Google, branding identity, and many more. Students also enhanced their conference experience by visiting one of New York City’s most creative design studios and showrooms.

Students who attended the conference were:
Lauren Bailey, junior advertising design major
Janelle Cain, junior graphic design major
Arnaldo Jimenez, senior graphic design major
Micaela Neuman, junior advertising design major
Margaret Schmidt, senior graphic design major

The conference focused on when design and business work together, brilliant things happen. “We heard some amazing stories from business and design leaders from a variety of industries,” said Arnaldo Jimenez, a senior graphic design major from Cleveland, Ohio. The presenters shared their “innovative approaches to generating greater return on investment, fostering emotional connections and providing positive brand experiences for customers” (gain.aiga.org).

The GAIN conference sold out in late September and had a substantial waiting list, weeks before the event. Nearly 700 individuals invested in travel costs and conference fees to attend this biennial gathering that bridges business and design.

“As marketing budgets are getting cut, we, as designers, are looking for acknowledgement for what we contribute to business success,” says Scott McClure, senior art director from Ogilvy & Mather.

“I was excited that our students were able to participate in the conference and to meet and talk with our most respected professionals in the industry,” said Professor Brit Rowe. The design community’s commitment was evident in that AIGA’s objective of demonstrating how design thinking creates value for business, society and culture was more important than ever in developing strategies and inspiring innovation in an uncertain economic environment.

Speakers included representatives from Google (Laura Granka), IDEO (Tom Kelley), Johnson & Johnson (Elan Cole and Chris Hacker), Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia (Stephen Doyle and Gael Towey), Pinkberry (Yolanda Santosa), Procter & Gamble (Dave Kuehler), Saturn (Chris Bower and Udaya Patnaik), Target (Phyllis Aragaki) and more. The “speakers touched on a critical role for the designer: finding ways to defeat habit through creativity and fresh approaches to problem solving,” said Richard Grefé, past AIGA executive director. “We hope every participant came away from this experience with refreshing ideas inspired by those who have used their creative talent, business acumen, perspective and empathy effectively. The success stories told at ‘GAIN’ will hopefully lead to more productive designer-client teams, solving problems and creating value for all.”

 

Bruce ChesserRetired Professor Invited for Solo Exhibition
ONU Professor Emeritus Bruce Chesser's recent work is on exhibit at Monroe County Community College through Nov. 17, 2008.

Bruce specializes in contemporary interpretations of traditional functional ceramics. He is a former instructor at Ohio Northern University and served as chair of the department of art for 12 years. Previously, he taught at Ohio University, Athens.

He holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in fine arts from OU and has participated in more than 100 juried, invitational and one-person art shows. Mr. Chesser also has conducted numerous workshops and lectures on salt-glazing and raku pottery.

The exhibition is part of the college's Visiting Artist Program and will be on display through Nov. 17 in the Campbell Learning Resources Center, 1555 S. Raisinville Rd.

The LRC hours are 8 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fridays and 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays. It is closed Sundays.

 

juried show 2008The Annual Student Juried Exhibition To Open at Ohio Northern
The department of art & design proudly announces the annual Student Juried Exhibition, which will be on display at the Elzay Gallery of Art from November 4–December 17 in Ada, Ohio. A public reception and awards presentation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m., Tuesday, November 4.

For many years, a committee of sophomore art & design majors is responsible for organizing and presenting the show, traditionally the most popular gallery event of the academic year. This year's exhibition will feature original work in a variety of media such as ceramics, oils and watercolors, photographs, graphic design, drawings, sculpture, mixed media and printmaking.

The exhibition is a competition open to any undergraduate student enrolled at Ohio Northern University. Any work completed for an art & design departmental course is eligible for consideration. Submissions fall into three categories: two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and graphic design. Invited jurors review the submitted entries and make the final selections. This year, two external judges will jury the work into the exhibition.

"The exhibition provides students with the valuable experience of showing their work within a professional setting," said Melissa Eddings, Ohio Northern's gallery director and professor who curates the Elzay and Stambaugh Galleries. "At the same time, it provides the Ohio Northern and Ada communities an opportunity to view works by talented young artists and designers."

Admission to the Elzay Gallery of Art is free and open to the public, daily from noon - 5p.m. For additional information about the University's 2008-09 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160.

 

Get Out the Vote PostersAIGA|ONU Student Chapter Motivates Campus Community To “Get Out the Vote”
By Rebecca Monce, freshman language arts education, literature and Spanish major
Are you going to vote? No? Take a stroll around campus and rethink your answer. The AIGA/Ohio Northern University student chapter has created a striking display of posters aimed at promoting participation at this year’s national election.

The AIGA|The Professional Association for Design is a nationwide association which works to “advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force” (AIGA.com). Get Out the Vote, a national AIGA Design for Democracy initiative since the 2000 election, enables designers to engage in the public arena by contributing to a coordinated voter mobilization campaign. The 2008 poster campaign builds on the efforts made in 2004, when participants created more than 50,000 AIGA posters that were displayed in public places in communities across the nation and made available as online PDFs for anyone to download, print and post independently.

The AIGA/ONU student chapter is doing their part with a chain of vivid and spirited posters, each of which urges the ONU community to vote. These nonpartisan posters not only display the message to vote, they brand it into the minds of students and staff with a series of stunning images. By motivating eligible citizens to register and turn out on election day, the Get Out the Vote campaign fulfills an ongoing AIGA objective of demonstrating the value of design to the public, public officials and business by providing a clear call to action for an activity that is important to everyone.

The posters can be viewed all around campus and in the Elzay Gallery Lobby starting the week of October 19, which was “National Design Week.” The students chose to hang the posters during this week to contribute to the NDW, a project that attempts to highlight the various ways in which design enhances our daily lives.

For questions related to ONU’s Get Out the Vote campaign, please contact the department of art & design at art@onu.edu or 419.772.2160.

 

Cup #125, Luke SheetsONU Professor Accepted into Competition
October 2008
—Ohio Northern University Department of Art & Design faculty member, Luke Sheets, was recently accepted to the 6th annual “It’s Only Clay” National Juried Ceramics Competition and Exhibition sponsored by the Bemidji Community Art Center and the Bemidji State University Visual Arts Department.

This annual National juried ceramics competition and exhibition is a collaboration sponsored by the BCAC and Bemidji State University. IOC features a lecture and workshop on the campus of Bemidji State University by artist and potter Linda Christianson and a juried exhibition of functional ceramics by the Bemidji Community Art Center on exhibit in Nov. and Dec. 2008. Previous jurors include Jeff Oestreich, Robert Briscoe, Bill Gossman and Bob and Cheryl Husby.

Linda Christianson, the juror for the competition, stated, “The pots we use in our home are like stage sets. At rest on a table, dish drainer, or in a cupboard, they are visually engaging. Through use they provide access to other activities : gathering food from the garden, cooking, conversation, dining, arrangement of flowers, sorting of papers. This daily relationship with the pots offers up both utility and continual visual inquiry. Like a stage set, the pot has an ability to disappear and then reappear.”

The BCAC’s exhibit, It’s Only Clay National Juried Competition and Exhibition, received over 160 images from 55 artists around the US. Only 45 artists were accepted.

Luke Sheets earned his BFA from Ohio Northern University and his MFA from Bowling Green State University. He has had work accepted into national competitions including the 8th Annual National Juried Cup Show. In 2005, he had work published in 500 Cups: Ceramic Explorations of Utility and Grace, a book printed by Lark Books. Prof. Sheets currently teaches ceramics at ONU and is responsible for the three-dimensional program in the department of art & design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Panel from The Creepy TreeArt & Design Homecoming Exhibit Features ONU Graduate Kyle Hotz
October 17, 2008—Graphic novel illustrator Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93) of Bellbrook, Ohio is this year’s department of art & design’s Homecoming Exhibit and Lecture Series featured artist. The show highlights a number of panels from his recent novel, The Creepy Tree, which includes original, preliminary sketches to completed color comprehensives.

The lecture will begin at 3p.m. on Friday, October 17 in the Wilson Art Center. A reception will follow at 4p.m. at the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery. The exhibition runs from October 17–31.

Kyle has worked as an illustrator and writer of comic books since 1991. His work has appeared in a series published by Marvel Comics (Periscope Studios), DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics. He has completed work on Marvel’s Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: The Osborn Journal, The Man-Thing and The Hood under Marvel’s MAX Comics imprint. Often referred to as the “master of macabre,” Kyle created Mosaic in 1999 under Sirius, his first written and illustrated graphic novel. Other horror titles Kyle has worked on include Ghost Ride, Zombie, Criminal Macabre and Evil Ernie. In 2007 at DC, his work won a Young Adult Library Services Association Award (Great Graphic Novels for Teens) for Bill the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities.

Novelist and screenwriter Philip Nutman says of Kyle’s work, “Like the cinematographers of Hollywood’s golden age, Hotz knows how to paint with light and shade, creating a chiaroscuro world worthy of Caravaggio. Add to this his eye for twisted detail and an ability to make the everyday appear strange and/or menacing. Well, I don’t think either Bosch or Goya would be disappointed… Alongside Kelley Jones, [Kyle] is unquestionably one of the finest artists of the macabre working in comics today."

Admission to the exhibit is free and open to the public, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and before Freed Center events. For additional information about the University’s 2008-09 gallery season, contact the department of art & design 419.772.2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

annual picnicAnnual A&D Department Picnic Welcomes Students, Faculty and Staff
September—On Tuesday, September 16, Professor Brit Rowe, chair of the department of art & design, welcomed faculty, staff, and students to the annual department picnic, followed by a convocation.

The annual meeting is meant to be “an academic gathering for the sharing of information about the new school year,” Rowe explained. It is the first time the entire department —undergraduates, faculty and staff—comes together in one room.

The faculty had a chance to share new programs and stress important events including the gallery season, study abroad programs and advising. Student leaders also had a chance to showcase their activities and events. The chapter presidents from AIGA, the Student Art League, Kappa Pi and the National Art Education Association already had programs planned for the upcoming school year.

In total, there are 40 undergraduate students, four full-time faculty and four part-time faculty. The department is housed in the Wilson Art Center, a state-of-the art facility with up-to-date studios and classrooms.

The faculty noted that the year will fly by, simply because “there is so much to do beyond classes. We strongly encourage all of our students to get involved and stay active,” said Melissa Eddings, associate professor in art.

 

Fall film series logoFall Film Series Announced
The Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design announces its Fall quarter film series. The series focuses on the lives people as they “endure the forces of nature.”

The film series was created to showcase the achievements of the film industry and to promote critical thinking and self-analysis. All members of the university community are invited to attend film showings.

Films are shown at 6p.m. in room 115 of the Wilson Art Center located on Gilbert Street.

Into the Wild
Sept. 18
A young man from a well-to-do family hitchhikes to Alaska after
giving away $25,000 to OxFam, abandoning his car and most
of his possessions, burns all the cash in his wallet and invents a new
life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found
by a moose hunter...

Jeremiah Johnson
Oct. 2
One man's rugged effort to shed the burden of civilization
and learn to survive in the wilderness of the Rocky Mountains.

Never Cry Wolf
Oct. 16
A young inexperienced biologist, is deposited alone onto the
desolate Arctic terrain to endure the forces of nature as he
documents the mysterious habits of the wolves he has been sent
to study, an odyssey of self-discovery.

Grizzly Man
Oct. 30
Explores the life and death of amateur grizzly bear
expert and wildlife preservationist Timothy Treadwell.

 

 

Prof. Linda LehmanOhio Art Education Association Honors ONU Professor Linda Lehman
Prof. Linda Lehman, visiting assistant to the director of the Center For Teacher Education, will be receiving a 20-year Circa Recognition Award and will be inducted into the Ohio Art Education Association Circa Honor Society.

The OAEA (Ohio Art Education Association) Circa Society awards honor educators who have shown long-term service and professional dedication to the OAEA in the field of visual art education. Founded in 1954, OAEA promotes educational growth and leadership among its 2,000 members.

Prof. Lehman is a former public school classroom and art teacher. While at Ohio Northern, she began an innovative Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) program for ONU education students and children from surrounding school districts. She teaches the art education courses in the department of art & design.

ONU offers degrees in art education, studio arts, graphic design and advertising design. The department also holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department of art & design is recognized in the second edition of "Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers" as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide.

 

teapots“Teapots: Object to Subject” Opens Gallery Season at Ohio Northern University
A teapot has a traditional silhouette: the pour spout protrudes at an angle, the handle is a simple loop for the server to grasp while pouring the tea, and the vessel itself is a symmetrical receptacle for liquid. Yet among the artworks included in the Ohio Northern University exhibit, Teapots: Object to Subject, there are wildly inventive and engaging vessels.

This exhibition will open the 2008–09 gallery season at Ohio Northern University from September 9 through October 19 in the Elzay Gallery of Art. A “High Tea” reception will be held Friday, Sept. 19, at 5p.m.

The works on display are examples of the most ingenious approaches to the contemporary teapot. Of course, teapots are still produced in the traditional materials of ceramics, metal, and glass, but artists constantly stretch and test the boundaries of the genre. They strive to challenge the concept of the teapot as a predictable, traditional vessel. Some of these visionaries incorporate fabric, precious metals, or found items from nature, and their artistic approaches vary from tromp d’oeil to the whimsical and sculptural.

The appeal of the teapot has many roots. This modest domestic object is so familiar, so comfortable, yet its rich history and misleadingly simple form make it an ideal object for artistic exploration. Today the teapot has one foot in the art world and the other in the kitchen. The contemporary American teapot has become one of the most significant objects of art pottery being produced and collected in this country. While some artists create teapots intended for use, others view the traditional teapot as a starting point for individual artistic expression. For both the creator and the collector, teapots that challenge the division between the worlds of art and everyday use are often the most exciting.

Exhibition curator Leslie Ferrin, author of Teapots Transformed: Exploration of an Object, has been curating exhibitions on contemporary teapots for more than 20 years. In this exhibition, Ferrin presents the concept that as the teapot becomes more abstracted, its function becomes less relevant. In effect, the subject of the work becomes the primary focus; the initial object, the teapot, becomes a secondary concern for the artist and the viewer.

Claudia Tarantino, who works exclusively in porcelain, explains, “Organic forms and the artistry and complexity of nature inspire my work… that brief moment when the fruit or vegetable is just right, at its prime, ready to be eaten…” Another artist working with luscious glazes and china paints is Karen Marie Portaleo.

Having been born and raised in Colorado, Blair Meerfeld enjoys incorporating native clays and material in his work, particularly salt-glazed stoneware. The objective of his work, says the artist, “is to unite traditional processes with contemporary color and form, resulting in a unique statement in clay.”

Richard Notkin is a full-time studio artist who lives and works in Helena, Montana. He has worked mainly in ceramics for over 30 years, and his series of Yixing-inspired teapots and ceramic sculptures have been exhibited and collected internationally. Other artists in the exhibition include Adrian Arleo, Peter Scherzer, Richard Swanson, Bennett Bean, Michael Simon, and Noi Volkov.

The exhibition will be accompanied by educational materials covering the history of the teapot, tea ceremonies, and cultivation, as well as the most current publications available on the contemporary teapot.

Admission to the Elzay Gallery of Art is free and open to the public, daily from noon to 5 p.m. For additional information, to schedule a tour or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art & design at (419) 772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

Melissa Eddings-MancusoONU Art Professor Selected for Painting Invitational
September
—Ohio Northern Department of Art & Design Professor Melissa Eddings-Mancuso was chosen to participate in an alumni exhibition at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania held September 3–25.

The Bruce Gallery of Art kicked-off the academic year with the “Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Invitational MFA Alumni Painting Exhibition.” The exhibition was part of the Bruce Gallery Art Alumni Exhibition Series, which was in its fourth year.

The show was curated by Edinboro University professor Rachel Burke of the art department and the late Steve Emmet, who contacted the 10 artists involved in the show and invited them to participate. The exhibition was organized by John Bavaro, Director of the Bruce Gallery.

The paintings featured in the show were culled from three decades of artistic achievement. All paintings were created by alumni of Edinboro’s celebrated Master of Fine Arts program in painting. Each artist was a graduate of the Edinboro University MFA program between 1982 and 2006. Some of the selected artists were in the first classes to go through the MFA program, founded in the 1970s.

There were the traditional oil-on-canvases, including Melissa’s work selected for the show. Other choices included Nancy Werder’s work that used Popsicle sticks in all of her pieces “because they’re common. They’re a metaphor for the common people I use in my work,” she said.

All of the artists included in the show accomplished great things since their days at Edinboro University. Some of them have become practicing artists while others have gone on to teaching.

Edinboro’s art department enrolls 1,000 students and hires 45 full-time faculty members, and has long been recognized as the finest art institution among the 14 schools in the Pennsylvania higher educational system. The art department graduates have exhibited their works in major galleries across the nation.

Prof. Melissa Eddings-Mancuso is associate professor of art at Ohio Northern University. She teaches painting, drawing and printmaking courses in the department of art & design. She also is responsible for the two-dimensional program in the studio arts major.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Lima Memorial AdDesign Students Complete Summer Internships
The department of art & design continues to promote the importance of the internship program and recognizes the achievements of our interns. During the 2008 summer term, four students had the opportunity to gain experience at companies such as The Wexner Center for the Arts, Lima Memorial Hospital, The Detroit Studio and The Milan Historical Museum.

“One thing that I wanted from an internship experience was to be involved in real work,” said Steve Gill, a graphic design student. He had an opportunity to intern at Lima Memorial Hospital. The internship allowed him to interact and learn from communication and design professionals. He also had an opportunity to meet one-on-one with clients and with printers. “I think this internship taught me real life issues that I will deal with after graduation. I learned a lot about the process of getting a project completed, including how to design under a tight deadline.”

Graduating senior Ashley Hale completed her internship at The Milan Historical Museum, a non-profit organization located just steps from the birthplace of America’s greatest inventor, Thomas A. Edison. “The museum is recognized by the National Trust as a Distinctive Destination,” said Ashley. “I felt that I was well prepared for this internship. I worked on many design projects and a few photographic tasks as well. I had to discuss my work with the director who had to present the final designs to the board members, printers, and trustees. It was an awesome experience knowing that hundreds of people will be holding and reading a piece of marketing you designed!”

Warhol Ad“The Detriot Studio in Cleveland is growing and I was excited to be there,” said Arnaldo Jimenez, a senior graphic design major. “My internship allowed me to build my self-confidence. I worked on real world projects and had time to develop a personal Web site. It was great working directly with the top designers of the firm.”

In Columbus, senior graphic design major Margaret Schmidt worked with the director of design from the Wexner Center. “ I worked on advertising campaigns and a campaign for the upcoming Warhol exhibit. The internship was a valuable experience and allowed me to network and interact with other professionals.”

Recognizing that students learn best when they are truly engaged in hands-on educational experiences, the department of art & design requires internships to complement the classroom education. Each A&D major includes some kind of internship experience, allowing students to select opportunities that best suit their curriculum and career goals. Recent A&D student internships have included a design internship at Walgreens in Chicago, a design internship in Washington, D.C., and a design internship at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati.

 

gallery seasonArt exhibition and gallery season opens at Ohio Northern University
Ohio Northern University announces the opening of its 2008-09 art exhibition and gallery season at the Elzay and Stambaugh Studio Theatre galleries. The gallery season is designed to serve as a cultural resource for the Ohio Northern community and surrounding region, as well as to host national and international touring exhibitions and programs, and original exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment.

This exhibition season showcases invited shows, artists and designers who encourage dialogue about the visual arts including studio processes, history, criticism, curation, and cultural contexts. The season also showcases artists and designs with areas of expertise in biological and environmental preservation art in recognition of the University’s Year of the Polar Bear.

Featured exhibits include: Teapots: Object to Subject; The Graphic Imperative: International Posters for Peace, Social Justice and the Environment; Environmental Visions featuring nine artists; Graphic Novel Illustrator Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93); Veiled Reality by Linda Lee Nicholas; and ONU student exhibitions.

Admission to the Elzay and Stambaugh galleries is free and open to the public, daily from noon to 5 p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery is also open prior to events held at Ohio Northern’s Freed Center for the Performing Arts. For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu/a+s/art for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

 

Margaret presents brand identityTurning Scholarship into Service: Community Outreach at the Art & Design Department
In the design studio of the Wilson Art Center may seem an unlikely place for community outreach. But, that’s where three of Ohio Northern University’s graphic design majors sought and found solutions to a range of brand identity problems this past spring.

Senior Sarah Herman, from Crestline, Ohio spent eight months on a project that has the potential to transform a non-profit organization into a thriving community center in the downtown Village of Ada, Ohio. “The organization first started out as ReStore, an outreach of the United Methodist Church in 2006. Today, with the launch of a new identity design, Open Arms strives to reach more people in the Ada community,” said Sarah. “The new name, along with a business plan, better reflects the mission and purpose of Open Arms—to share God’s love with all visitors. It’s a great place to meet and visit people of all ages.”

The first part to Sarah’s project combined the research and analysis of the organization’s position in the marketplace, its visual identity and the marketing initiatives. These components were eventually redeveloped to work together to support Open Arms’ business goals.

Sarah added, “I learned everything I could about Open Arms. I talked to volunteers, students, and community leaders. I read a lot about design initiatives in small communities and what made them successful. I learned what the organization was about, what it did, what it looked like and what it wanted to look like, feel like and how the community perceived the organization. It was a big challenge.”

Junior graphic design major Steve Gill from Pandora, Ohio, undertook a similar process to his project. He worked with the Allen East Community Center, a new organization located in the Allen East School District of Harrod, Ohio. In addition to researching and developing a strategy, the “brand positioning created the most difficult aspect of the project,” said Steve. “I had to find out how the AECC’s services compared to other community centers’ and to other competitors’ in the area. I found what made their services unique or different and their potential markets and audiences.”

Cincinnati native and junior design student Margaret Schmidt created an identity for the Ada Public Library. After completing a brand strategy and positioning, “I created the identity,” said Margaret. “This is the entire visual language that the library used to communicate with its audience. It’s more than just a logo. The brand identity reflected the library’s mission and the vision statement. It wasn’t just about borrowing books. It was about community culture and how design expressed those ideas.”

Translating what students learn in the classroom to real world design solutions has been a key success to the graphic design program at ONU. “It was important to provide students with the opportunity to work with real clients,” said Brit Rowe, professor in graphic design. “All three projects gave the students a chance to collaborate with local community leaders and professionals. And because of these experiences, students have developed relevant workplace skills. It was exciting to watch the students begin from ground zero, present their final solutions and grow as designers.”

“It was very exciting for us to have an ONU student work on our identity,” said Michael Limer, director of the Ada Public Library. “The concept was well conceived and very professionally presented. We couldn’t have been happier and more pleased.”

For more information about the graphic design program, including internship information, please contact the art & design department at 419.772.2160.

 

 

Design Camp PresentationsDesign Plays a Part in Identity of Local Village
by Morgan Baughman
Ada, Oh. - A new exhibit in the Elzay Gallery of Art at Ohio Northern University features student work from this year's summer design camp, "Design: Think. Know. Do."
Taught by university art & design professor Brit Rowe, "Design: Think. Know. Do." was a camp part of the ONU Summer Honors Institute program. During the course of six days, twelve 9th and 10th grade students researched, designed, and created a strategy of urban renewal projects for the local village.
The mulitdiscipline design project promoted creative solutions to real-life problems. Rowe's aim was to provide the students with an opportunity to have a direct influence on the visual and physical presence of a section of the village. Students extended beyond discipline-specific boundaries to engage in a holistic design process that drew on students' experiences and broadened their perspectives. "Students investigated the village's mainstreet commercial architecture as a reflection of community character and identity, historical and cultural trends, commercial enterprise, marketing and advertising," said Rowe. Students then created a model and a system to address the primary opportunities of navigation, orientation and discovery.
During the 2007 course, high school students collaborated with Professor Rowe, putting in roughly thirty hours of work learning about and designing a portable, emergency shelter system. The summer course allowed the students one hour of college credit.
For the fourth consecutive year, Ohio Northern University hosted the Summer Honors Institute for gifted high school students. A number of different courses designed to provide in-depth study of challenging topics were offered over a two-week period in July on the Ada campus.
Admission to the exhibit is free and open to the public by appointment only, weekdays. To schedule your visit, or for additional information, please contact the department of art & design at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

 

calligraphy classTwo cultures collide on ONU's campus
July 31, 2008

Beth L. Jokinen, Lima News

ADA - They arrived a week ago barely able to communicate with each other.

It's still not easy, but the American and Japanese high school students are finding their way. They help each other with homework, laugh while playing games and even console each other when they're homesick.

"In just a couple of days we could already see this appreciation for each other, of their cultures and their differences," said Robert Alexander, who's heading the summer camp at Ohio Northern University.

Sixteen American students from around the country and 20 Japanese students from Saitama Prefecture are spending three weeks together on campus for the Kasukabe-U.S. Summer Camp.

This is the first year of the camp. Kasukabe is a high school in Saitama that focuses on ways of teaching English. Students earn college credits for participating in the summer camp.

The Japanese students came armed with electronic translators and the American students have dictionaries, but the majority of communicating comes in other ways.

"There's a lot of hand gestures and pointing," said 16-year-old Raelin Ingram, of Washington Courthouse. Her sister traveled to Japan a few years ago, sparking her interest in the camp.

Kasumi Sato and Shiori Tokuse, both 17, said through an interpreter that the program is a good chance for them to study in the U.S. and learn English. While they understand English pretty well, they have trouble speaking it.

The students room together.

calligraphy class"Sharing a room with an American student is a new experience. Lifestyle is totally different," Tokuse said, saying that she has tried to teach Japanese phrases to the American students, and learn American phrases from them.

The students are picking up more than just the language from each other. Seventeen-year-old Nate McMeans, of Xenia, has found himself taking on Japanese habits, including nodding a lot and simplifying his speech. Communicating is becoming easier, he said.
"All of the activities brought us together and kind of forced us to find some way to communicate," he said.

The students spend most of their days together, including eating meals, recreational activities and fieldtrips. The group is headed to Cedar Point this weekend and will attend a Toledo Mud Hens game.

Alexander said it's important for the activities to include both cultures. A recent trip to a Japanese restaurant introduced the American students to seaweed salad. The Japanese students weren't sure what to think about a large meal of fried chicken and mashed potatoes that same day. They laugh together when remembering the past week's experiences.

"It's really hard to believe they've only been together for a week," Alexander said. "They have really bonded a great deal. ... We've been planning this for a year, and to see that they are connecting in this way is really rewarding."

 

Department of Art & Design

Ann Hood

419-772-2160
b-hood@onu.edu
Wilson Art Building
525 South Main Street
Ada, Ohio 45810
Monday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed