Skip To Main Content
Skip To Main Content

2007–08 News

News | 2007-08 Academic Year

Freed Leadership AwardsGraphic Design/Professional & Organizational Communication Major Wins Leadership Award
May—Bethany Schreck, a freshman art/graphic design major from Bethel Park, Pa., was one of eight ONU students to receive the DeBow Freed Award for Outstanding Leadership.

Ohio Northern’s annual President’s Leadership Dessert, held April 30, honored eight students, a male and female from each class. Each year since 1999, the office of Greek life, student activities and leadership has partnered with Omicron Delta Kappa, the national leadership honorary, to co-sponsor the event.

The Dessert recognized the leadership contributions of students to the campus and to campus organizations. Winners were selected from nominations based on the positive leadership they demonstrated. Monetary awards were given, and the names of the recipients were added to the bronze Freed Award plaque in McIntosh Center.

image: Bethany (first row, next to Coach Tressel) posses with other student leaders.

 

ONU Alumni and Faculty Earn Awards in Juried Show
May
—The Wassenberg Art Center, in Van Wert, recently announced the award winners for the 52nd annual June Art Exhibit, which runs through June 20. Exhibit hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free.

Ohio Northern University alumnus, Ed Corle (BA ’78), of Findlay, Ohio won the David Humphreys Miller Award.

Judith Greavu, an associate professor of art at ONU, won the Art-to-Art Palette Journal Award and honorable mention.

Professor of Art Bruce Chesser also won honorable mention.

The Wassenberg Art Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and encouraging the visual arts in the Van Wert, Ohio area. Groups may contact the director to arrange special tours of exhibits. The director is also available as a speaker for groups or organizations at no charge. For information on Art Center activities, contact the Wassenberg Art Center at 419.238.6837 or toll free at 1.888.238.3837, e-mail wassenberg@embarqmail.com.

The Ohio Northern department of art offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

ArtSpace GalleryRealistic Oils, Abstract Sculptures, Ceramics Rule 2008 Spring Show at ArtSpace
April 2008—Overheard at the Friday, April 18, reception for the opening of Spring Show 2008: ‘Well, everybody wants to get into Spring Show.”

Well, many people, at least. Eighty-one artists submitted work for consideration. As it turned out, jurors Melissa Eddings-Mancuso of Ohio Northern University's department of art & design and Robert Lepo of LepoWorks, Inc., selected 56 pieces for the show, ranging from Tom Stewart’s Best of Show kinetic sculpture Wild Flowers to intimate oils and graphite drawings, jewelry, cut paper, woodcuts, watercolors, intaglio prints, photographs and ceramics.

Juror Robert Lepo remarked about the show: “The public will have an opportunity to view the talents of northwest Ohio’s most gifted artists where art is alive and well."

Greg Jones won the First Award for his oil portrait, Cooper.

The Second Award went to Prof. Ed Corle, an Ohio Northern University graduate, for his ceramic piece, Blue Ash Vase. The Third Award also went to a ceramic piece, Prof. Luke Sheets’ Kimchi for Charcoal. Prof. Sheets graduated from Ohio Northern and is currently the teaches ceramics at ONU's department of art & design.

In the media categories, Bill Millmine won the Martha Farmer Award for Sculpture, Gregg Luginbuhl won in Ceramics, and Ben Hartley in Oils. Emily Shaner was awarded the ArtSpace/Lima Photography Club Award.

Reported by a visitor during the run of the show: “It’s just such a beautifully hung show — there are just enough works to fill the gallery, but not so many that they compete for attention. It’s just about perfect.”

Spring Show 2008 was sponsored by Time Warner Cable and Re-Max Market Place Realty.

For images of all the prize-winning works, as well as a photo album and video clips of the opening night reception, please visit the ArtSpace/Lima website.

The Ohio Northern department of art offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

Creative for a CauseONU Graphic Design Professor Included in “Creative for a Cause”
February
—Ohio Northern University’s graphic design professor, W. Brit Rowe, has been selected for Creative for a Cause, a collaborative resource for design educators.

“Creative for a Cause: The Inclusion of Social Responsibility in the Visual Communications Curriculum” is a global resource for graphic design educators and for socially minded designers. It originally comprised of two dozen detailed case studies of how socially conscious design is being taught in schools across the United States. The resource also has comprehensive lists of publications, websites, sources of funding, schools, and “professional role models” all pertaining to working in the fields of marketing, advertising, and design from an ethical stand point.

“I wanted to contribute a case study about my own pedagogy,” says Rowe, “because I’m interested in teaching and adopting social and ethical approaches to our design curriculum. This project is fantastic because it should provide invaluable information to anyone interested in working or teaching differently.”

Founded at Syracuse University by Heidi Cies, Creative for a Cause aims to assist teaching social responsibility in design education.

“While social responsibility is being discussed more and more frequently within the visual communications industry and among educators today,” says Heidi, “no standards or guidelines currently exist to aid in the implementation of these concepts into the higher education curriculum. Where social responsibility is not already part of a visual communications program, and there is little or no administrative support for inclusion, it is left to individual instructors to decide how to best integrate this topic into their syllabi. This project is a collaborative resource for educators of visual communications who wish to instruct their students on the importance of adopting a social and ethical approach to their work.”

According to Brit, the ONU case study contains evidence of class assignments, curriculum goals as they pertain to social responsibility, and an interview. “For every course I teach,” says Rowe, “I include some aspect of social responsibility, or what I refer to as visual advocacy. Even at the foundation level, our students complete projects that emphasize the importance of design for doing something valuable for the community.”

“Last year we completed a project grounded in political activism,” explained Brit. “Our state governor wanted to do away with Choice Grants, a $900 stipend for students who attend college in Ohio. Our class discussed how designers could use their skills to create social and political change, and how they can contribute their time and talents to public service organizations to promote awareness for a cause. The students had to really think about the political process, how state budgets are created, and the role of the media in shaping values and public opinion.”

Brit generally receives good feedback from his students regarding these types of projects. “Students eventually admit that they really do begin to think about issues in different ways.” But in the end, it is his goal to get students thinking of themselves as citizens, and taking on values and responsibilities as citizens. “I want them to think about the choices they make, and how their work has an impact beyond visual communications. There are ethical issues and environmental issues to consider, and as designers they have the ability to educate their clients about these issues as well.

Brit Rowe is assistant professor and chair of the department of art & design. He joined the Ohio Northern faculty in 1999 after receiving his BFA degree from Ohio Northern and the MFA degree in graphic design from the University of Michigan.

He is a member of AIGA/The Professional Association for Design, the University and College Designers Association, Kappa Pi, Theta Chi, Order of Omega and Omicron Delta Kappa. He has considerable experience as a graphic designer, has exhibited regionally and has worked for clients such as Norwich University, the United Way, and many others. He also has collaborated with design students for local organizations such as the Ada Public Library, the Village of Ada, Restore Community Center, the Allen East Community Center and ONU.

Since 2006, he has presented at national design educators’ conferences, was inducted into Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers, served as an external program consultant and juried various regional competitions.

On campus, Brit serves on various college and university committees, teaches a high school design camp during the Summer Honors Institute, volunteers as an advisor for three student organizations, serves as the Regional Director for Theta Chi’s Great Lakes Region, and coordinates the design internship program in the department of art & design.

The Ohio Northern department of art offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

Department of Art & DesignONU Art Department To Host Portfolio Scholarship Day
February— The art department of Ohio Northern University invites all incoming students to participate in the annual Portfolio Scholarship Day at the Wilson Art Center. This is an exciting opportunity for prospective students to compete for a Talent Award based on a submitted portfolio.

The Portfolio Scholarship Day is scheduled for Saturday, February 9, 2008, beginning
at 9a.m. The day includes portfolio critique sessions, drawing and writing tests, and lunch on campus. Once students make a reservation, a complete itinerary will be emailed with specific times for scheduled activities.

To reserve a place for the 2008 portfolio review, please contact the art department at 419.772.2160 or by email at art@onu.edu. Prospective students must apply to Ohio Northern in order to qualify for a Talent Award. Families may contact the Admissions Office for an application (1.888.408.4ONU or www.onu.edu).

The department of art has strong programs in studio arts, graphic design, advertising design, and art education, with additional courses in interactive design, photography and drawing/illustration. ONU students can pursue careers in graphic design, corporate identity, advertising, wayfinding design, publication design, illustration, web design, exhibit design and curating, art therapy, art education and many other fields.

The department is housed in the Wilson Art Center, a state-of-the art facility with up-to-date studios, classrooms, and computer lab. The Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery feature an ambitious exhibit season and visiting artist program. Each year students gain practical experiences through internships, exhibiting work, student teaching, workshops, conferences and design practica that provide hands-on learning with various publications and the department’s production workshop.

The department also features a number of student organizations, exhibits and workshops, a film series, study abroad opportunities, summer European trips, and student exhibits.

Please contact the department of art for further information and reservations.

 

 

Luke SheetsOhio Northern Professor “Crafts Content” for Ceramic Symposium
January
—Professor Luke Sheets, an instructor in art in the department of art & design at Ohio Northern University, was recently accepted into the exhibition “Material Transcendence: Clay as Commentary” to be held during the Crafting Content: Ceramic Symposium, January 31–February 2, 2008 at the University of Arkansas.

The symposium investigates how artists who work primarily with clay, a material stigmatized by technique and process, go beyond this stereotype to express concepts. “Crafting Content: Ceramic Symposium 2008,” is the second symposium in a biennial series. The mission of these symposia is to create a forum for contemporary ceramicists to engage in a critical discourse concerning the culture of ceramics. As is standard practice in the art world at large, the artists and critics involved in this symposium address content as well as material. These artists constitute the vanguard of contemporary ceramics in their consideration of ceramic materials as fundamentally tied to concept. This new sense of the medium of ceramics has occurred in part, because of a paradigm shift, which requires that the conceptual understanding of material be considered in all processes of art making. The progressive scholars in ceramics do not wish to negate the traditions and history of the medium, but rather to enhance the relevance of the material beyond mere technique and process.

Stigmas and stereotypes can become catalysts, capable of empowering groups to reject common societal misperceptions, and in so doing, positively impact culture. Many artists have refuted allegations of craft’s insignificance to art, proudly elevating traditional craft materials and processes in their teaching and research. These ceramic artists are not isolated in clay studios, but rather take an interdisciplinary approach, working and thinking alongside painters, sculptors, engineers and scientists.

Symposium organizer Jeannie Hulen said, “What we need now is an assembly of diverse scholars and experts in ceramics who are actively facilitating conversations and publications that encompass a new critical discourse beyond the basic science of ceramics and its history. During the past 50 years, academia has become the primary setting in which to learn the craft of art. In a university setting, schools and departments of art are competing for funding with their colleagues in science, engineering, business, etcetera. This mandatory competition has fostered an atmosphere in which artists, whether functioning within academia or not, must rise to the challenge of validating and conceptually justifying their work.”

This in turn has seeped into classrooms, where students are required to explain the conceptual basis behind their production. Although funding is not the only reason for theoretical justification of artwork, monetary decisions are relevant, though never discussed in publications concerning contemporary art making. At the same time, ceramic programs have grown and maintained their place in the art curriculum, unlike many other craft media, which have waned into virtual extinction. This has placed ceramics in a position of power to affect pedagogy.

Professor Sheets acknowledges the influential position of ceramics and is committed to utilizing symposia as a means of advancing new directions in the field. Ceramics is an accessible medium to viewers and users outside of the arts. The material is affordable, functional, and, unlike most things in contemporary culture, is hand-made. According to Luke, “The symposium embraces the full potential of the ceramics medium and its pedagogy. The material is multifaceted and I want to be involved in shaping the future of ceramics and crafting content with visual and conceptual eloquence.”

Luke Sheets earned his BFA from Ohio Northern University and his MFA from Bowling Green State University. He has had work accepted into national competitions including the 8th Annual National Juried Cup Show. Prof. Sheets is currently teaches ceramics at ONU and is responsible for the three-dimensional program in the department of art & design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

 

Digestive Table Make Art! An Interactive Exhibition Featured at Ohio Northern
January—Ohio Northern University’s gallery season opens its 2008 schedule with an interactive exhibit called, Make Art!. The work represented in this show offers the audience a personalized experience of participating, creating and transforming a work of art. The pieces alter and react depending on the viewer and his or her unique vantage point, giving audience members an interactive encounter. The exhibition is on display in the Elzay Gallery of Art from January 7–31, 2008.

“We are excited to offer the community this fascinating exhibit, composed of some highly acclaimed artists,” said Melissa Eddings, director of galleries at Ohio Northern. “The general public and students are certainly encouraged to visit and play an active role in the displays, which is a different and sometimes intimidating approach to viewing works of art. This interactive process allows the audience to be more involved in the work, creating a memorable experience that they won’t soon forget.”

Among the artists represented in the show include Barbara Furbish of the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Amy Youngs of the Ohio State University, and Bonnie Mitchell and Elaine Lillios of Bowling Green State University.

In Youngs’ Digestive Table, viewers are invited to take an active role while learning about the ecosystem’s digestive structure. “Worms, sowbugs and bacteria are invited to this table,” said Youngs, “and they are a part of the digestive system that starts with a person discarding food leftovers and shredded paper into the portal at the top. The bacteria and sowbugs begin breaking down the waste. Soon, the worms join in to further digest it into a rich compost that sprinkles out of the bottom of the fabric bag that hangs beneath the table. This compost is used as a fertilizer for plants, such as those at the base of the table.”

“The human plays an important part at the table”, continued Youngs, “by eating, feeding the food waste to the worms, feeding the resulting fertilizer to the plants, or by simply sitting and appreciating the living ecosystem she/he is a part of. A cross-section of the activity inside the top 9 inches of the compost is made visible using an infrared security camera connected to an LCD screen built into the table. On the screen, viewers can see the live movements of the worms and sowbugs inside.”

Among other interactive works of art in the exhibit include Encounters by BGSU faculty Mitchell and Lillios. This exhibit invites the viewer to be immersed in an artificially simulated environment of digital art and reflective music. Within this display, the participant is encouraged to contemplate, relax and be enlightened.

Visitors to Make Art! can also participate in an interactive mirror fashioned by New York artist Daniel Rozin, play with digital butterflies designed by Austin, Texas, artist Zach Booth Simpson and take part in the universal game Gossip, created by Los Angeles artist Barbara Lee Furbush, in which viewers will be able to connect with people who previously visited the game.

Admission to the Elzay Gallery of Art is free and open to the public, daily from noon – 5p.m. For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu/a+s/art for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

 

Judith GreavuONU Retired Art Professor Featured in Exhibit
January
—An exhibit of sculptures and paintings by Professor Judith Greavu will open in the Defiance College Women’s Commission Gallery Tuesday, January 16. An opening reception will be held that evening from 6:30 to 8p.m., which is free and open to the public.

Included in the exhibit are four new bronze sculptures that continue a series of works that reference marine flora, fauna and ecological relationships. Four older bronzes of polluted tidepools are also on display. An artist’s residency in the Florida Everglades in 2006, learning about spoiled habitats and endangered animals, let to further images, including a sculpture representing a 9.5 foot alligator and several paintings.


The exhibit also includes works, in a range of media, which explore departures from the marine imagery of the bronzes. Recent issues of social and political import have distracted the artist from her quiet concern for the health of the world’s oceans, rivers and lakes. The war in Iraq and the social crisis of conscience caused by Hurricane Katrina are explored in two small installations. Exploration of the issues has led to new media combinations such as cloth covered sand bags and translucent fused glass panels.


Greavu currently lives and works rural Dola, Ohio. Retired from Ohio Northern University as an associate professor of art, she received her BS in art education from Ball State University in 1963, and her MFA in painting from Bowling Green State University in 1967. She has traveled the world and has given workshops and lectures all over the United States. Her exhibition record includes solo shows, group exhibitions, and juried shows.


The exhibit runs through February 9. The Defiance College Women’s Commission Gallery is located in Dana Hall on East Sessions Street. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8a.m. to 8p.m., and other hours by appointment. For more information, contact the gallery at 419-783-2444.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: detail of a sculpture on display in the Women’s Commission Gallery by Judith Greavu.

 

Alphabet exhibitAlphabet: An Exhibition of Hand-Drawn Lettering and Experimental Typography
December—The department of art at Ohio Northern University proudly presents Alphabet: An Exhibition of Hand-Drawn Lettering and Experimental Typography curated by Post Typography and Artscape from Baltimore. The exhibition will be on display in the Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery from December 3–21, 2007. The opening reception, hosted by the ONU Student Chapter of AIGA/The Professional Association for Design, will be held Friday, December 7 from 3–5p.m. A public lecture by the students will begin at 4p.m. Both the reception and lecture will take place in the Elzay Gallery of Art located on Gilbert Street.

Focusing on an ordinary subject that we see each day, often in the hundreds of thousands, Alphabet presents 26 letters as more than just shapes for conveying information. The 51 artists and designers in this show conceive and interpret the alphabet in surprising and inventive ways, ranging from graceful and polished to witty and subversive.

The 63 alphabets featured in Alphabet were created by artists in North America, Europe and Asia, representing work from well-known typographers such as Ed Fella and Ken Barber to young, rising artists such as Sweden’s Hjärta Smärta and Andrew Jeffrey Wright of Philadelphia’s Space 1026.

The alphabets in the exhibition reflect a range of thinking about lettering that encompasses the conceptual, illustrative, typographic, concrete and beyond. Some of the artists have created their alphabets from a variety of non-traditional media or found objects. Andrew Byrom constructed a series of 26 welded, steel frame tables and chairs, which when viewed from certain angles form a lowercase alphabet (some chairs may be more functional than others).

A likeminded, though more fluid approach to dimensional letters is Reagan Marshall’s “Body Language”, exhibited as a series of photographs which document a “typographic ballet.” In the performance, the dancer contorts herself inside a specially-constructed spandex bag to create letters from the human form. Taking a more structured approach, Apirat Infahsaeng conscripts a series of board games to serve typography—one alphabet uses a Connect Four frame as a matrix for a complete character set, while another uses the elements of a Tangrams puzzle to explore different configurations of geometric characters.

Elaine Lustig Cohen’s modularly-constructed alphabet achieves a similar result to Infahsaeng’s “Tangrams”. Cohen is one of a group of influential American designers whose work brought the ideas of European Modernism to the American graphic design mainstream in the 1950s. Her alphabet, an homage to her late husband (the designer Alvin Lustig), is created solely from geometric letterpress ornaments and reflects a Bauhaus-like rationality and formal approach to letterform construction.

Other artists in Alphabet echo Cohen’s modernist approach with their own modular fonts. Tore Terrasi’s animated alphabet “Whimcircle” is composed of various combinations of different-sized circles. Using a minimum of visual elements, each letter forms an abstracted facial expression as the circles rearrange themselves.

Admission to the Elzay and Stambaugh galleries is free and open to the public, daily from noon – 5p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

Post Typography Originally conceived and founded as an avant garde anti-design movement by Nolen Strals and Bruce Willen, Post Typography specializes in graphic design, conceptual typography, and custom lettering/illustration with additional forays into art, apparel, music, curatorial work, design theory, and vandalism. Their work has received numerous fancy design awards and has been featured in such publications as Ellen Lupton’s Thinking With Type, The Art of Modern Rock, Metropolis Magazine, and upcoming design surveys from Taschen and Phaidon.

Post Typography has appeared in multiple exhibitions, and their posters are collected by high school punk rockers and prominent designers, whom they consider equally important. Strals and Willen currently teach classes in advanced typography at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and have lectured at the Cooper Union, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and Harvard University among others.

Artscape Artscape, Baltimore’s annual arts festival and the largest arts festival in the region, celebrated its 26th anniversary in 2007. Hundreds of thousands of visitors attend Artscape each year to experience the festival’s popular schedule of music, dance, fashion, theater, opera, literary arts, and film. In addition to the three day festival, a series of high-quality, curated visual arts exhibitions and events take place at venues throughout the city during the month of July.

Alphabet was among these exhibits, many of which are organized by internationally recognized artists and curators, and feature a range of excellent contemporary art from Baltimore and around the world.

The Ohio Northern department of art offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

 

Students at Findlay Art LeagueOhio Northern Alumni, Faculty, and Students Accepted into Findlay Art League’s Juried Exhibit
Eight Ohio Northern University alumni, faculty and students were among the artists accepted into the Findlay Art League’s Juried Exhibit, and four were selected as award winners from a field of over 100 entrants.

Harry Melroy, a 1971 graduate, was the second place winner for “The Garden Abduction,” an oil painting on canvas. Laura Barnhardt-Corle, a 1977 graduate and an ONU part-time instructor in art, was the third place winner for “Nessler’s Barn,” a watercolor on paper.

Honorable mentions were awarded to Rhonda Grubbs, a part-time instructor in art, for her work “Letting Go of Myself,” an acrylic and collage on paper and to Stephanie Rader, a junior art/studio arts/art education major from Mt. Cory, Ohio, for her work “To What You Give Your Heart,” a color reduction print on paper.

Other Ohio Northern alumni, faculty and students accepted into the exhibition included:
David Stoker, a senior chemistry/art minor from Cloverdale, Ohio.
Leslie Rohr Scherer, a 1997 graduate from Tiffin, Ohio.
Ed Corle, a 1978 graduate from Findlay, Ohio.
Luke Sheets, an instructor in art at ONU and a 1995 ONU graduate from Ada, Ohio.

David Cottrell, the curator for ArtSpace Lima, served as the judge for the show. He said, “The diversity and competence was extraordinary for a group of work this size. Subject matter to media, size to color, [the exhibit] provided this community with a great opportunity to see good work.”

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Admission to the exhibit is free, and open to the public, and runs through Sunday, November 25, 2007. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10a.m.- 2p.m., Fridays 10a.m.-2p.m. and 5-8p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 11a.m.-5p.m. The gallery is located at 117 W. Crawford Street in Findlay.

The Ohio Northern department of art offers two major degree programs in studio arts, advertising design and graphic design, and a K-12 licensure program in art education. The department also operates the university’s gallery season, which hosts exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. For additional information about Ohio Northern University’s art and design program, please contact the department of art at 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

 

GooteeMemories Adrift Debuts at Ohio Northern
Morgan Baughman, senior, professional writing major

The department of art & design at Ohio Northern University proudly presents Memories Adrift: Photographs by Marita Gootee. The exhibition will be on display in the Elzay Gallery of Art and the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery from November 2-30, 2007.

Gootee earned a bachelor’s degree from the College of the Mount Saint Joseph in Ohio and an MFA from Indiana State University in 1985, specializing in photography. She has been an instructor at Mississippi State University since 1986.

She has exhibited her work throughout the United States, including an upcoming exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. Gootee is praised for constantly exploring the art form of photography and working on new techniques and approaches. She regularly employs a variety of pinhole cameras to capture divergent landscapes and human images.

Gootee draws her inspiration from her life and surroundings. “Each image is a new and creative interpretation of a visual memory,” says Gootee. “To accept and refresh through a visual exploration of this imagery is my goal...”

Gootee uses a variety of photographic process (traditional, digital, and alternative). An array of printing papers, colored pencils, and linseed oil help Gootee achieve a unique platform. Landscapes lurk with drawn-in monsters; fuzzy pinhole photos spruced with color mimic memories; and digital work shows repetition of subjects in different perspectives. Gootee said her images explore the concept of memories: fluid, subject to reinterpretation and not always clear. Blurred images hint at the blending of time and self-reflection, she added.

Gootee also said her work doesn’t seek to find the grand truths in life. Instead, her pieces serve as reminders of the special in the everyday. “It’s the small moments that come together to make life special,” she said. “It’s reflecting on the idea of memories not being as precise as we thought,” the artist explained. “They’re more fragments of almost broken spaces.”

Admission to the Elzay and Stambaugh galleries is free and open to the public, daily from noon – 5p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

 

 

Elzay Gallery Lobby showcases collection of paper-engineering books
Morgan Baughman, senior professional writing major

Ada, Oh – If you are not already a fan of the magic of pop-up books, you will appreciate them and the work that goes into creating interactive, pop-up books after you've browsed this exhibit.

For fall quarter, the cases surrounding the lobby of the Elzay Gallery will feature the prized pop-up book collection of Dr. Alfred E. Cohoe, professor of psychology at Ohio Northern.

Most people are familiar with simple pop-up books from their childhood. But this exhibit of books demonstrates that pop-up (or paper engineering) books can be created for many types of narratives and books. Spread the pages of these books and entire three-dimensional rooms will appear; cards will swarm like bees around Alice in her wonderland; a miniature version of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water will stand upright.

Dr. Cohoe’s collection truly offers something for everyone, whether you're interested in Monet’s gardens, King Tut’s tomb, Medieval knights, music lessons, old-time cameras, wild fiction classics, or airplanes. There is even a pop-up book about polar bears.

One of the featured paper-engineering artists is Robert Sabuda. In his creation of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (a pop-up adaptation of Lewis Carroll's Original Tale. N. Y.: Little Simon, 2003.), Sabuta breaks the physical bonds of the flat page as his images literally burst out of the page. He is considered the contemporary master of paper engineering as each of his productions has become more complex and exciting.

The collection features so many books that not all of them can be shown open in the cases at once. Thus the department is planning to regularly rotate them so visitors get the chance to see inside each one. So, be sure to stop by several times during the quarter. You will be surprised.

The Elzay Gallery lobby is open from 8am-5pm Monday through Saturday and 1-5pm Sunday. For additional information, please contact the department of art 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu.

 

 

McConnor ExhibitOhio Northern University presents “Guitar Composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries”
October—The department of art & design at Ohio Northern University premiers “Guitar Composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries,” an exhibition by professor Sean McConnor, October 5–28, 2007 in the Elzay Gallery of Art on Gilbert Street. A reception is scheduled for October 28, 1–3p.m. with a lecture beginning at 1:30p.m. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

McConnor received his Bachelor of Arts degree in art education from Kent State in 1996 and his MFA degree in painting from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He is a former instructor at Edinboro University and former chairman of the department of art at Thiel College. He now serves Thiel College as an assistant professor of art, gallery director and curator of the permanent collection.

McConnor has much experience with portraiture and landscape painting. Many of his portraits have a smudged, silhouette feel, as if the viewer were seeing the painting through a rain-stained window. He has exhibited work in the Sampson, Bates and Meadville art galleries in Pennsylvania, and in the Kelley Randall Gallery in Cleveland, Ohio. His work has been accepted into numerous juried exhibitions, including the Erie Art Museum and the Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts.

For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

SMArts classSMArts Combines Art and Academics
October—
By Morgan Baughman
Senior in professional writing from Mansfield, Ohio

During October a program called Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) helped Northern education majors make a direct connection with local elementary students. The program was created by education professor Linda Lehman.

Every Saturday morning in October, 19 Northern teacher candidates from Lehman's EDUC 390 Integrating the Visual Arts and Academics class met with 50 kindergarten through sixth grade students from Bath and Ada in the Wilson Art building. There the elementary students participated in a number of art-based activities, including activities focused on art history, aesthetics, art production, art criticism, and connecting the arts to other disciplines such as English, math, social studies, and science.

The theme of the program was that art tells a story. One activity included having the students write a story about a piece of art that they made. Lehman explained, "We wanted the students to understand that they're always telling a story with their art, that this is a story that can be written down."

Lehman, a former public school classroom and art teacher, envisioned the program as a great opportunity for her college students to gain experience teaching. Lehman said, "What I learned while teaching art was so valuable, and I think it's important, at a university level, to teach teachers those skills and how exciting art can be when taught well."

Junior early childhood education major Kelli Powell, who participated in SMArts as a teacher candidate, commented, "The first time I heard about the SMArts program, I was really excited. I thought it was a great opportunity to implement what we were learning within our art class while also practicing being in front of students. The more experience we have with instructing students, the better teachers we become. I hope to someday be able to use some of the media we explored during SMArts in my own classroom."

The ratio of students to teacher candidates was about 4:1. The teacher candidates were responsible for planning and implementing activities for the students. In addition, the teacher candidates kept a record of reflections on the days' activities.

SMArts classBut SMArts was not just about clinical experience for teacher candidates. SMArts also acted as a good way to expose public school students to media that they normally do not have a chance experience. Lehman's prospectus for the program states, "Elementary schools are often reluctant to purchase art texts...when so much pressure exists to buy materials to improve math, reading and science scores instead." Powell affirmed, "Art is an essential part of any curriculum. It encourages student creativity, problem solving, and self-discovery. It also provides a means of communication for students who may struggle with putting their thoughts into words. SMArts allowed the students to thrive because it gave them time. They had plenty of time to experiment and produce beautiful, unique works of art. Our students also learned social skills such as acceptance and tolerance. They learned that it is all right for someone to feel differently about a work of art or to create their piece of art differently."

SMArts goal is to integrate art with traditional academic subjects. For example, SMArts students learned how to make paper. In the process of learning how to make paper, students learned about organic versus inorganic materials and that paper can only be made from organic materials. In fact, every SMArts project tried to make a connection with another discipline. The goal in emphasizing these connections was that students would begin independently notice how art relates to other subjects. Lehman also pointed out that, "Art helps children learn to think critically, to utilize higher level thinking skills. Our economy is constantly changing, and we need to be able to put learners into that economy, who can analyze information that hasn't even been created yet. Art helps children develop the creative problem solving skills that employers are looking for."

In addition, Lehman saw another practical need for the program. Ohio recently issued a new Academic Content Standards for the Visual Arts, which splits the visual arts into five categories, art history, aesthetics, art production, art criticism, and art as a cross discipline, the same five categories addressed by SMArts. Lehman pointed out that conventionally, most public schools direct nearly all their attention towards art production. Lehman stressed that art in elementary schools should be "about more than holiday art or cute art for the hallway."

SMArts students also studied photography and sculpture. "Our concentration was on process versus product," said Lehman. "When you focus on thinking about how to put something together and actually creating it (the process) the product takes care of itself."

Parents showed overwhelming support for the SMArts program. Parents submitted SMArts applications for over 210 children. Unfortunately, the program was funded to support 50 children, so the students were chosen by lottery method, with special consideration given to lower income families.

This year's program was funded by the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation. Transportation from Bath Elementary School to Northern's campus was provided by Proctor and Gamble. Due to funding, participants were provided these opportunities at no cost. Though SMArts was only funded for the 2006 year, Lehman hopes that the overwhelming interest shown by parents and students will prompt renewed funding that would make the SMArts program possible for years to come.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Dr. Suzzane LomaxThe Application of Chemistry to the Examination of Works of Art
Lecturer: Suzanne Lomax, National Gallery of Art

Sponsored by the ONU Department of Chemistry
Funded by the Krisler Lecture Fund

Monday, October 1, 2007 at 7 p.m.
Dicke Forum (James F. Dicke Business College)

Chemists, physicists and material scientists have been associated with museum conservation laboratories for many years. Scientists can make valuable contributions in the preservation and restoration of art objects. At present, about a dozen museums in the United States have conservation science departments.

Art conservators frequently require specific information about the component materials of a painting or object prior to treatment. Additionally, curators may have art historical questions about a work of art. Due to their complex stratification, most questions that arise concern the nature of the components of paintings. Microscopic cross sections of a painting are frequently taken and viewed with a polarizing light microscope to understand the different layers that make up the object. These cross sections can also be examined by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Pigment identification is frequently employed to determine if the pigments are in keeping with the time period of the object, as well as to understand the artists' materials and methods. They are performed using polarized light microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of powdered samples, or x-ray fluorescence (XRF), which is well suited to this task due to its non-invasive nature.

To study the identity of binding media and other organic components of works of art, the conservation scientist uses gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and infrared spectroscopy. GC-MS is used to identify oil- and protein-containing binders, as well as for the identification of waxes and various low molecular weight resins. HPLC can be used to identify organic dyes. Identification of higher molecular weight binders such as alkyds and acrylics is normally done with pyrolysis gas chromatography.

The talk will focus on the application of these various techniques to the examination of paintings and sculpture. Examples will be presented from the collection of the National Gallery of Art.

Biography: Suzanne Quillen Lomax received her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1984 from the University of Maryland, working with Patrick Mariano exploring the photochemistry of iminium salts. She then studied intramolecular photoaddition reactions with Frederick Lewis at Northwestern University. Dr. Lomax has been in the Scientific Research Department of the National Gallery of Art since 1986, investigating the identification and aging behavior of artists' materials. Lately, her areas of research interest include the identification of modern synthetic organic pigments and binders. Dr. Lomax has been a popular speaker for the American Chemical Society Speaker Service since 1991, traveling to over 30 states. She is also on the board of directors and a spectral reviewer for the infrared and Raman users group (IRUG).

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Steve EmmettPainting Exhibit Opens the 2007–08 Gallery Season at Ohio Northern
September—Ohio Northern University Department of Art is proud to present Steve Emmett’s Paintings. The exhibit will be on display in the Elzay and Stambaugh Studio Theatre galleries from September 4–30, 2007. Steve teaches drawing, painting, and foundations classes at Edinboro University.


Steve works primarily with oil paints. He says, “I do not render my subjects as specific ‘portraits’ but attempt to present the figure as a more inclusive vessel for expressive notions…I attempt to balance areas of accident and improvisation with passages that are more detailed and sharp.”

This additive and subtractive process gives Emmett’s paintings a unique look. Layering adds an element of mystery. Each layer is like a time period in the life of the painting itself. Whole eras are confined within the frame. In some areas instances in time peek out from behind caked, dried, and cracked oil paints. Others instances in the painting’s past are hidden somewhere beneath the coatings.

Admission to the Elzay and Stambaugh galleries is free and open to the public, daily from noon – 5p.m. The Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery also is open prior to Freed Center events. For additional information, to schedule a tour, or to be placed on the arts exhibition mailing list, please contact the department of art 419-772-2160 or art@onu.edu. Visit www.onu.edu for the latest information about times, locations, and additions to the schedule.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Nancy SirkisNew York City Photographer Returns for “Places Like Ada” Exhibit
September—Scenes of Ada, Alger, Bluffton, Dunkirk, “Jumbo,” Mt. Victory and Roundhead are included in “Places Like Ada,” an exhibit of digital photographs of Mid-western small towns and villages by noted New York photographer Nancy Sirkis.

In a lecture open to the public, Sirkis will be illustrating her technique through slides of her work at 8 p.m. on Friday, September 7, 2007 in the Dicke Forum of the James F. Dicke College of Business Administration on Main Street, Ada.

The “Places Like Ada” exhibit will be held September 8-9 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the historic train depot on Main Street, Ada. It will feature photographs from Minnesota and Iowa in addition to the area Ohio locales.

The Ada photos include two uptown scenes and several of the ONU buildings on Main Street.

Sirkis, who is interested in architecture and Americana, has been exhibiting her work around the nation since 1970. In July an exhibit of her photographs from Cuba was held in the New York’s Soho district. In August, a gallery in the Chelsea section of New York featured her photographs of subway stations from all over the world.

Although Sirkis has published books of standard 35mm photographs, her latest exhibits involve a digital technique that combines several photos into one, giving the observer a larger field of view than ordinarily possible. The resulting images are colorful and often mural-like, with a stark quality reminiscent of a Hollywood stage set.

A photographer, artist and teacher, Sirkis says, “I cannot remember a time when I did not draw, paint, or take photographs. I want to distill an image into its essence… with Photoshop, I am no longer limited to depicting a fleeting second. By combining images taken at many different moments, I can evoke the timeless essence of a street, courtyard or neighborhood because I can direct the choreography of time.”

Sirkis visited Ohio locales last spring after photographing for two weeks in Morocco. Her work has appeared in The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies Home Journal, This Week, Mademoiselle, Look, Gentlemen’s Quarterly, Esquire, the New York Times magazine, and many other magazines. She has published five books of photographs.

“Places Like Ada” is a joint venture of the Art Department of Ohio Northern University, the ONU Cultural Affairs and Special Events Committee, and the Ada Rotary Club. Proceeds from the sale of photographs will benefit the Ada Rotary Scholarship Fund.

In addition, the Ada Rotary Club will display Sirkis’s Ohio photographs on September 15, in a booth at the Harvest and Herb Festival in Ada.

Born in New York City, Sirkis holds a B.F.A. from the Rhode Island School of Design and M.A. from Hunter College. She has taught photography for more than thirty years as a staff member of the International Center of Photography in New York.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.



Luke SheetsONU Ceramic Professor Accepted into National Show
June
—Ohio Northern University art professor, Luke Sheets, has been accepted into The 15th Annual Strictly Functional Pottery National Exhibition. The national exhibit showcases every year the best in contemporary American functional ceramics. The national juried competition has been held annually since 1993 and is recognized as one of the top ceramic exhibitions in the country.

Only 105 ceramic works were accepted, which meant that, “I was able to select only one from every 10 entries,” stated Malcolm Davis, the juror for this year’s National.

When selecting the final pieces for the show, Davis mentioned, “I looked for strong forms, evidence of good craftsmanship and design. I considered issues of balance, scale and proportion. I gave considerable attention to technique, as well as thoughtful planning and execution. I put a lot of weight on imagination and the personal aesthetic. I also wanted to address the issue of surface: whether decoration, texture and firing complemented and completed the work or were irrelevant.

“For me personally, it was wonderful to see the variety, breadth and imagination that the ceramicists all brought to clay. It was thrilling and inspiring,” mentioned Davis.

The Strictly Functional Pottery National Exhibition will be held at the Market House Craft Center in East Petersburg, Pennsylvania. Originally founded in 1946 as the Conestoga Valley Chapter of the PA Guild of Craftsmen, the Center is a nonprofit educational organization whose mission is to encourage, educate and promote quality crafts and craftsmanship.

Luke Sheets earned his BFA from Ohio Northern University and his MFA from Bowling Green State University. He has had work accepted into national competitions including the 8th Annual National Juried Cup Show. Prof. Sheets is currently teaches ceramics at ONU and is responsible for the three-dimensional program in the department of art & design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

image: Double Gourd Jar, Professor Luke Sheets

Department of Art & Design

Ann Hood

419-772-2160
b-hood@onu.edu
Wilson Art Building
525 South Main Street
Ada, Ohio 45810
Monday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed