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A&D Alumni News

Harry Melroy

Alumni News 2009–10

Two Ohio Northern A&D Alumni Earn Awards
May
—The work of two Ohio Northern University alumni won awards during the Findlay Art League’s annual juried show.

Harry Melroy (BA ’71) won an award for merit/best use of color for an acrylic painting called, “Streaming to Dry Dock.”

With an undergraduate degree from Ohio Northern University, Harry currently teaches art at Mohawk junior high school in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at both the University of Findlay and Tiffin University. Harry has won numerous awards for his work and has recently exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

Winning an award of merit was Ed Corle (BFA ’78) for a ceramic piece called “Wide Poka-dot Raku Vase.”

Ed is an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He has been with the University of Findlay since 1986. Ed attended Ohio Northern University and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1978. He also attended Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1982.

He has participated in many art shows including the Toledo Art Museum's area artist exhibition. In addition, he participates in area art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair and The Black Swamp Arts Festival.  He is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

The judges for the show were Kim and Jim Fultz. Kim is an abstract, multi-media artist with a degree in fashion and art, and a degree in sculpture, with an emphasis in painting and drawing.  Since 2000 she has been working and showing her art in galleries and museums in the New York area.

Jim is an abstract realist artist with a MFA in painting from Ohio University and a BFA from Akron University. He has worked as Gallery educator for the Guggenheim Museum and Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. Kim and Jim have recently moved back to northwest Ohio and Jim is an adjunct professor at Bluffton University and Owens Community College.

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Admission to the exhibit is free, and open to the public, and runs through Saturday, May 30. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10a.m.–2p.m. The gallery is located at 117 W. Crawford Street in Findlay.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Harry Melroy

 

Toledo Museum of ArtOhio Northern Alumni Selected for Exhibit at the Toledo Museum of Art
May
—The Findlay Area Artists Exhibition, to be held in the Community Gallery at the Toledo Museum of Art, features the work of two Ohio Northern alumni.

Prof. Ed Corle (BFA ’78) and Laura Barnhardt Corle (BFA ’77) were selected for this juried exhibition. The show features a variety of media including painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics and more from 31 artists who live or have lived in Hancock County.

The exhibit is on display from May 21 through June 20. The museum is located at 2445 Monroe Street, Toledo.
An opening reception will be held on Friday, May 21 at 6 p.m. with comments and awards at 7:30 p.m. The museum is open until 10 p.m. The reception is open to the public. Refreshments will be served and live music will be provided.
Ed Corle is an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He has been with the University of Findlay since 1986. Ed attended Ohio Northern University and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1978. He also attended Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1982.

He has participated in many art shows including the Toledo Art Museum's area artist exhibition. In addition, he participates in area art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair and The Black Swamp Arts Festival.  He is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU in 1977, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio. Laura exhibits locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

The work was juried for selection by Mark Philip Venema, a Montreal based artist with a background in drawing, printmaking, painting and photography along with new media. He is a graduate of Concordia University with a Masters of Fine Arts in studio art. He also studied Fine Art at the University of Lisbon in Portugal and has participated in numerous exhibitions in Portugal, Canada and the United States. With a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and a master’s degree in intercultural studies, he has worked as a journalist in South Africa and Canada and as a teacher in California and Portugal.

The Toledo Museum of Art’s Community Gallery was founded as part of the initial Wallace Grant program, Art and the Workplace. Over the past 12 years, the Community Gallery exhibition schedule has expanded and diversified, making it one of the most important points of community contact for the museum and a launching point for a range of other community activities and partnerships. The Community Gallery is located on the first floor of the museum.

The exhibition is being coordinated by Red Tornado Art Productions, a local Findlay organization whose mission is to foster creativity and art excellence; provide unusual exhibition space to new and established visual artists; provide programs and activities that encourage public awareness, participation, and appreciation of the arts and to serve as a catalyst for small city revitalization via the arts.

The Toledo Museum of Art was founded in 1901 and has earned a global reputation for the quality of its collection, its innovative and extensive education programs, and its architecturally significant campus. The Museum’s holdings has more than 30,000 works of art representing American and European painting, the history of art in glass, ancient Greek, Roman, and Egyptian works, Asian and African art, medieval art, sculpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, and modern and contemporary art.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: The Toledo Museum of Art with Alexander Calder’s sculpture “Stegosaurus”.

 

Ed and Laura Corle exhibitTwo Outstanding Alumni Artists To Exhibit in Lima
May—The work of Ohio Northern alumni Ed and Laura Corle will be featured in the St. Rita’s Mezzanine Gallery in Lima through June 2010. A reception for the artists will be held Wednesday, May 5 from 5–7p.m. at the gallery.

“My paintings begin with an experience of connections to a place,” describes Laura. “This occurs when angles and light, breezes, temperature, humidity, and even scents join forces with the site, revealing textures and detail. I look for characteristics of use and wear, and faded beauty.”

When choosing subject for her paintings, Laura is very particular. “The sites for my paintings include fields of horses or livestock, barns, and empty houses of rural Ohio being reclaimed by nature through the passage of time.”

“The sense of having been there affects my conscious and unconscious choices. Sometimes I remember the smells and sounds, the brush of grass, or the echo of a hoof in a barn. But, whatever it is, the viewer falls into my work in a three-dimensional way.”

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU in 1977, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio. Laura exhibits locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

Ed Corle is an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He has been with the University of Findlay since 1986. Ed attended Ohio Northern University and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1978. He also attended Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1982.

He has participated in many art shows including the Toledo Art Museum's area artist exhibition. In addition, he participates in area art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair and The Black Swamp Arts Festival.  He is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Admission to the Mezzanine Gallery is free and open to the public. The gallery is located on the 2nd floor of the new wing of St. Rita’s Medical Center. Please contact ArtSpace for additional information (419.222.1721).

ArtSpace/Lima is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing visual arts to the West Central Ohio region including. Its organization occupies a turn-of-the-century three-story brick building in the North West quadrant of Town Square in Downtown Lima, Ohio.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: The Mezzanine Gallery featuring the work of Ed and Laura Corle.

 

 

ChesserONU Faculty, Students and Alumni Accepted into Juried Exhibit at ArtSpace/Lima
April
—The Juried Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima has quite the pedigree: over 50 years of bringing the highest quality of artwork to Lima. And this year’s exhibit adds even more luster to its already shining reputation.

“This is all the best the region has to offer,” said Bill Sullivan, operations manager at ArtSpace. “When I look at it, I am very pleased with the work.”

“These are superb, high-quality artists,” stated Sullivan. “And the work they’re displaying here is as good as we could ever want.”

And every year, it seems that ONU faculty, students or alumni earn awards in the show for their exemplary work. This year, again, was no exception.  Out of the 43 artists represented in the juried show, nine have ties to Ohio Northern.

• Professor Judith Greavu, retired associate professor in art, won the first place award for her bronze sculpture called “En Garde!” She received her BS in art education from Ball State University in 1963, and her MFA in painting from Bowling Green State University in 1967. She has traveled the world and has given workshops and lectures all over the United States. Her exhibition record includes numerous solo shows, group exhibitions, and juried shows.

• Alumnus Jaye Bumbaugh won the third place award for a watercolor and ink called “Blackie the Crow Flying his Airplane over Helmeted Crows.” Jaye is a retired professor in art and chair of the school’s art department. He received his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University in 1959 and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. His work was featured last May in an exhibit during ONU’s Alumni Weekend in celebration of his class’ 50th reunion.

• Professor Bruce Chesser, professor emeritus in art, had two large ceramic vessels accepted into the show. Professor Chesser specializes in contemporary interpretations of traditional functional ceramics. He is a retired professor of art at Ohio Northern University where he taught ceramics for over 30 years. He also served as chair of the department of art & design for 12 years. Previously, he taught at Ohio University, Athens. He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in fine arts from OU and has participated in more than 100 juried, invitational and one-person art shows. Prof. Chesser also conducts numerous workshops and lectures on salt-glazing and raku pottery.

• Professor Ed Corle also had two ceramic vessels accepted into the juried exhibition. Ed is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He graduated from Ohio Northern University in 1978 and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

• Alumna Laura Barnhardt-Corle had three watercolor pieces accepted into the show. She is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU in 1977, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio. Laura exhibits locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

• Professor Linda Lehman, visiting assistant to the director of the Center for Teacher Education at ONU, had two watercolor pieces accepted into the show. Prof. Lehman teaches art education as an instructor at Ohio Northern University. She also coordinates the Saturday Morning Arts enrichment program (SMArts) to provide fine arts education to the community’s children. Prof. Lehman is a member of the Watercolor Society, The Ohio Art Education Association, The Chicago Museum of Art, the Lima Art Study Group, and serves on a number of committees. She also serves on the Board of Trustees for ArtSpace Lima. She recently was inducted into the Ohio State University-Lima Advocates Hall of Fame, received a 20-year Circa Recognition Award from the Ohio Art Education Association, and was inducted into the OAEA Circa Honor Society that honors educators who have shown long-term service and professional dedication to the organization in the field of visual art education.

• Professor Luke Sheets, assistant professor in ceramics and director of the 3D program at Ohio Northern University, had two ceramic sculptures accepted into the Spring Juried Show. He earned his BFA from Ohio Northern University and his MFA from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many national competitions including the Majestic Galleries’ National Juried Competition 2009, the “Drink: Functional Forms for Every Libation” international competition, the 8th Annual National Juried Cup Show and the 6th Annual “It’s Only Clay” National Exhibition. In 2005, he had work included in “500 Cups: Ceramic Explorations of Utility and Grace,” a book published by Lark Books. Prof. At ONU, Sheets is the adviser to the Kappa Pi art honorary and is responsible for the three-dimensional program in the department of art & design.

• Alumnus Harry Melroy had a painting and two sculptures accepted into the exhibit. He currently teaches art at Mohawk junior high school in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at both the University of Findlay and Tiffin University. Harry has won numerous awards for his work and has recently exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

• Jeff Gibbons, a junior studio arts major from Toledo, Ohio, had two works accepted into the show—an oil painting called “Skeletons” and an artist’s book called “Thanatophobia.” Recently, Jeff won a scholarship to study at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont. He is interested in graphic novels, storytelling, writing, and design.

Judging this year’s show were Tamara Monk and Tom Hilty, both art professors at Bowling Green State University.

“This exhibit offers proof of a diverse visual art community within the 100 mile radius of Lima, Ohio,” explains Professors Monk and Hilty. “It shold be clear to the observer that no attempt was made to choose works of any single style. What the works chosen for this exhibition have in common is their high quality of creativity and effective utilization of materials. We were honored to jury this exhibition representing outstanding artists working and living in Ohio.”

“This is one of the oldest programs we put on here,” explains Sullivan. “This art show was started by the Lima Art Association at least 50 years ago, originally as a show in the autumn. Over the years, it gained momentum and got the reputation of being one of the strongest shows we do all year. It draws all the good people entering, in part because of its pedigree.”

The Juried Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima is on view from April 16–May 29. Admission to the Ellen Nelson Gallery is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10a.m.–5p.m., Saturday, 10a.m.–2p.m. and closed Sunday and Monday. Please contact ArtSpace for additional information (419.222.1721).

ArtSpace/Lima is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing visual arts to the West Central Ohio region including. Its organization occupies a turn-of-the-century three-story brick building in the North West quadrant of Town Square in Downtown Lima, Ohio.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Bruce Chesser, Bottle 1, ceramic.

 

Jaye BumbaughAlumnus Included in Exhibit near Toledo
April
—New paintings, drawings, and prints by Ohio Northern graduate Jaye Bumbaugh were selected for a group show at the Hudson Gallery, 5645 North Main St. in Sylvania, Ohio. The exhibit continues through April 17.

“I’ve always liked the challenge of working in a diversity of media, method, and scale,” expressed Jaye concerning his work. “I’ve always thought that there have been clear connections among even the most disparate of works. What has remained for me is the pleasure in the material qualities of paint, ink, wax, clay, linoleum, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, etc. I just want to make art. That is really all I have ever really wanted to do. I suppose critics and collectors want artists to be consistent. Realism and abstraction are interchangeable to me.”

“Each time I create a piece of art I remember my childhood, my innocence, my source,” explained Jaye. “Kurosawa said, ‘To create is to remember.’ Art has always reminded me of who I am when I make art. I’m not always sure if I’m trying to make sense. The whole idea of making art pushes me to some edge; sometimes I don’t know if I have enough answers to finish a piece. But then I think this is the ultimate challenge for the artist—the reward.”

Bumbaugh, a native of Lorain and now a resident of Lima, was a professor at Bluffton University for 37 years until 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University.

While at Bluffon, Jaye was instrumental in bringing the art department curriculum into the contemporary world, introducing new courses in airbrush, paper-making, figure drawing with the life model, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen and relief printmaking, welding and casting metals in sculpture.

Jaye’s work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. He currently is represented at the Marcia Evans Gallery in the Short North in Columbus, Ohio. In his work as an artist, Bumbaugh worked in many media including drawing in graphite, charcoal and pastel, painting in oils and watercolor, relief prints in linoleum, intaglio, silkscreen and lithography. In sculpture, he often has worked in ceramics and cast in bronze. More recently, he has worked with paper constructions in paper, foamboard, silkscreen and rag board.

Hudson Gallery relocated in 2006 into its current space in a restored building dating back to the mid 1800s. Located at street level in the historic downtown section of Sylvania, Ohio, the gallery is widely recognized as one of the regions premier venues for original art.

The gallery remains committed to its original philosophy of exhibiting the work of contemporary artists from this region next those with national appeal across many disciplines and media.  Our hope is to bring gifted new talent into the spotlight as well as showcase those artists demonstrating a lifelong commitment to the art world.

Gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday, 10a.m. to 6p.m. and Saturday, 10a.m. to 3p.m. The gallery is closed Sunday and Monday.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Elf Owl Sleeping in Strange Box, Jaye Bumbaugh

 

 

Ceramics MonthlyOhio Northern Graduate Featured in National Magazine
February
—An Ohio Northern University Department of Art & Design graduate in the art/ceramics program was featured in the February issue of Ceramics Monthly. The article showcased the work “Good Girls, 1968” by Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72).

The article, written by Glen R. Brown, reports on Marilyn’s most recent installation called “Good Girls, 1968.”

“From personal to universal,” wrote Glen, “the installation of busts pays homage to an artist’s classmates of 40 years ago, blending personal reminiscence with historical and cultural reflection.”

Completed in 2002, the work spotlights a series of portraits of 163 girls with whom she graduated from high school in Sharon, Pennsylvania.

“My art really is an extension of my history, my belief system, my value system, that I got growing up,” explained Marilyn, “from my parents, my aunts and uncles, my teachers.”

According to Sherman Hall, the editor for the magazine, this issue of Ceramics Monthly focuses on the intersection between pottery and industry.

“Most of us in studio ceramics see ourselves as separate from industrial ceramics. The differences are clear; ‘we’ make things by hand and ‘they’ don’t; we make one-of-a-kind objects and they don’t; we make limited, short-run lines of work for a relatively small audience, and they make large production runs for mass consumption. However, I would argue that there are more similarities than differences, and there is a whole lot of middle ground where industry and the studio overlap.”

Ceramics Monthly is published 10 times per year and is a special-interest publication for serious, dedicated ceramic artists who require relevant, informed content on contemporary ceramic art. Its broad coverage includes inspirational artist profiles, practical technical information, full-color images of artist’s works, insightful topical presentations, timely exhibition reviews, and the only comprehensive listings of events and calls for entry in the ceramic-art world.

Born in 1950 in Sharon, PA, Marilyn studied at Ohio Northern University (B.A. in 1972), at the Centro Internazionale Di Studi in Verona Italy (1970-71) and at Washington State University (M.F.A. in 1979). She has taught at various schools such as the Kansas City Art Institute, the Ohio State University and New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In 2000, she was a visiting artist in residence at Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Cover, Ceramics Monthly, Feb. 2010.

 

FAL 3D awards presentationOhio Northern Alumni Accepted to 3D Exhibit
February
—The Findlay Art League has a long history of juried exhibitions. This year for the first time, the Findlay Art League organized an exclusive show of three-dimensional work. It was an opportunity for sculptors, ceramicists, weavers and other textile artists, jewelers, metal artists and many other artists whose work ranged from relief to three-dimensional form to feature their conceptual ideas.

Award winners were announced and honored during the exhibition’s opening reception held in January at the Findlay Art League Gallery. Two Ohio Northern art alumni garnered recognition.

Ed Corle (BA ’78) won second place for a ceramic piece called “Copper Jar.” Ed is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He graduated from Ohio Northern University with a Bachelor of Arts degree and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in and been accepted to countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Harry Melroy (BA ’71) won honorable mention recognition for an entry called “The Dark Waves” made from stoneware. Harry earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Northern Illinois University. He teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University. Harry’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa. He also has won numerous awards for his work.

The juror for this year’s show was Doyle Long, a professional studio production potter. He has worked with or under nationally and internationally known ceramicists and has had work featured in Ceramics Monthly magazine. He also was responsible for the design, production, marketing and strategic planning of dinnerware in Delaware and Forest, Ohio. He earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Alfred University in Alfred, New York in 1978, his Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees from The University of Iowa in 1980.

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Ed Corle (left) presents at the Findlay Art League during the awards ceremony.

 

 

Marilyn LysohirOhio Northern Alumna Publishes ‘Good Girls’ Book
February
— Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72), like a character in a spy novel, leads a complicated life and plays many roles. She is an artist who works primarily in clay and has a national reputation. You will find her work reproduced in almost every ceramic book published in the last 15 or 20 years.

Just last month, Marilyn published her own book entitled “Good Girls,” distributed by Blurb in the United Kingdom.

The book chronicles her most recent, major installation called “Good Girls, 1968.” Completed in 2002, the work features a series of portraits of 163 girls with whom she graduated from high school in Sharon, Pennsylvania.

The 200-page book was designed by Sang-Won Cho of Sancho Design, a firm located in Lake Forest Park, Washington. He is an award-winning graphic designer and has worked with artists and many corporations.

“My art really is an extension of my history, my belief system, my value system, that I got growing up,” explained Marilyn, “from my parents, my aunts and uncles, my teachers.”

At times that extension is very personal.

Born in 1950 in Sharon, PA, Marilyn studied at Ohio Northern University (B.A. in 1972), at the Centro Internazionale Di Studi in Verona Italy (1970-71) and at Washington State University (M.F.A. in 1979). She has taught at various schools such as the Kansas City Art Institute, the Ohio State University and New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In 2000, she was a visiting artist in residence at Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design.

Marilyn LysohirThe 1960s were a period of great change in U.S. history. In particular, 1968 marked a year that many consider a pinnacle of cultural revolution and turmoil in the United States. Layered on top of all of these events—socially, politically and culturally—were the changing attitudes. In so many ways, 1968 served as a watershed year when a heavy dose of realism thrust a dagger into the heart of a fairy tale past. There was no turning back after 1968, and the collective cultural conscience of the country was never the same.

Since then, Marilyn exhibited a major installation “The Dark Side of Dazzle” across the United States starting in1991, and another “The Tattooed Ladies and the Dinosaur” beginning in 2002.

Then from 1995 to 2000, in addition to making her art, she and her husband Ross Coates published a yearly magazine called "High Ground" that was about the art and artists in the plateau region of the Pacific Northwest. Really more than just a magazine, each edition was an artist’s book with slides, audio tapes, and sometimes, actual pieces of art.

In 1997, remembering her first job in high school at Daffin’s Candy in Pennsylvania, Marilyn decided to start a small candy company called Cowgirl Chocolates. From a tiny beginning (partially conceived of as a performance piece), it has grown into an international enterprise with outlets in the US, Canada and Germany.

“My work is inspired by my family and my friends and the working class milieu in which I grew up,” said Marilyn. “When I begin a piece, I start with a personal idea—such as the death of my grandmother or my father surviving World War II, and then this idea evolves into a formal composition which usually takes me a long time to work-out.”

But the days in the studio are still most important.

“For me, as an artist,” Marilyn explained, “any piece is about communication and memory, and documenting the journey upon which all humans embark... from birth to death."

The book “Good Girls” went on sale in January and may be ordered through Blurb.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Cover and book spread from “Girl Girls” by Marilyn Lysohir

 

Jill DavisOhio Northern Alumna Takes “Charge” at the Cleveland Play House
January
—A way of life in the world of theater is often a challenge and a collaborative endeavor requiring individual achievement. A single production, for example, may assemble talented artists of playwrights, actors, musicians, designers and experts in scene construction and lighting.

For one Ohio Northern graduate, she saw the theater as the most comprehensive of all the arts—and the most demanding and exciting.

Jill Davis (BFA ’94) of Cleveland, Ohio is the charge scenic artist at the Cleveland Play House where she has been since 2001. She has painted over 90 shows and has designed sets for many of the ClevelandPlay House Children’s Shows and all of the sets for the Cleveland Playhouse–Case MFA Acting Program.

“In many ways, we are artists and designers,” explains Jill. Theatrical designers use the magic of sound, lighting, costume, and scenic design to transport audiences into new realms. “I create a major part of that experience.”

From surreal dreamscapes to realistic interiors, Jill has built spaces and universes that become the world of a drama on stage. “My work needs to deliver a creative pathway to live storytelling.”

Jill’s design process always begins with reading the play and meeting with the director to understand his or her interpretation of the play. Often times researching historical periods or investigating other issues takes a lot of her time as well. “Charge artists need to learn to apply a variety of skills to fully create a realized production,” said Jill.

Of times Jill works with other scenic artists and designers to plan and paint the scenery for the productions at the Playhouse. Sculpture and props also may be part of her job description.

“Most often, I am responsible for creating samples for the production with the approval of the designer,” explained Jill. “I have to organize all the elements for a show. It’s important to understand color theory, perception and materials.”

Jill has designed and painted many scenes for the Cleveland Play House Children’s Theatre including The Wind in the Willows, Jabberwocky, Puss in Boots, The Emperor’s New Clothes, Nutcracker and Follow the Seasons. She also has designed and painted scenes for the CASE/Cleveland Play House Graduate Ensemble including Angels in America, As You Like It, Big Love, Heartbreak House, The Little Foxes, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Triumph of Love, The Real Thing, Hurlyburly, Bus Stop, Twelfth Night, and Hayfever. Her other credits for the Cleveland Play House include A Bright Room Called Day, Much Ado About Nothing, Shadow of a Gunman and Glass Menagerie.

Jill also was the scenic artist for the many Ohio Northern theater productions including Godspell, Pippin, Valguse Poik, Diary of Anne Frank, Six Women with Brain Death, Oklahoma!, Forever Plaid, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Nunsense, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, The King and I, Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?, and Pump Boys and Dinettes.

After graduating with a major in art from Ohio Northern, Jill earned a MFA degree in scene design from Temple University. She then went on to work for the Alley Theatre in Houston, Texas, which won the 1996 Tony Award for outstanding regional theatre.

She also was the charge artist at the Porthouse Theatre at Blossom Music Center in Ohio, the charge artist at the Weston Playhouse in Vermont, and the charge artist at the Playmakers Theatre in North Carolina.

The Cleveland Play House, which is comprised of many of the nation’s most accomplished theatrical professionals. Founded in 1915, The Cleveland Play House is the first permanently established professional theatre in the United States. More than 12 million people have attended over 1,400 productions at The Play House – including more than 130 American and/or World Premieres.

Today, The Cleveland Play House is an artist-driven theatre that serves the Greater Cleveland community by holding true to its mission: To produce plays of the highest professional standards that inspire, stimulate, and entertain our diverse audiences, and to conduct training and educational programs that enhance the quality of life for those we serve and help to insure the future of theatre.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design or the University’s 2009-10 Arts Exhibition Season, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Heartbreak House, designed and painted by Jill Davis.

 

 

 

Karen SargentONU Alumna Captures Her Mind’s Eye at Hallmark
December
—“I have never been around a body of such beautiful work,” Karen Sisung Sargent, BFA ’79 says in reference to Hallmark Cards, Inc. in Kansas City, KS.

Sargent’s dreams came true in 1999 when she was offered a position with Hallmark Cards, Inc., America’s top greeting card company. She is an illustrator commissioned to sit in a studio throughout the day and do what she loves—paint. Sargent corresponds with the art director on various designs, mostly focusing on animals.

“There are a lot of peoples’ ideas that go into everything I do,” she says of her designs. “It is a collaborative effort, therefore extremely important to have a good rapport with all involved.”

Sargent feels fortunate that she is doing exactly what she wants to do. Many in the art field aren’t getting to do what they want to do because everything is digital.

“As an illustrator,” she explains, I love to draw and now that everything is digitized, many of the positions, even within Hallmark, have converted the technology.

At this point, Sargent feels confident she will remain an illustrator, however realizes there is no such thing as job safety. Hallmark sends her along with other illustrators on trips to see what is happening in the ‘ever-changing’ society of the U.S.

“They (Hallmark) really want to keep us keep in touch with the trends… they want to know the pulse of the consumer.”

Although it has become her expertise, painting wasn’t always Sargent’s passion.

“I enjoyed drawing and pencils in high school,” she explains, “never did I think about painting, and to be honest I wasn’t seriously considering college.”

It was her art teacher in Gibralter, MI, an ONU graduate, who pushed for her to look into Ohio Northern’s art and design department. And so she did.

“Ohio Northern is where I learned to paint,” states Sargent, “and now it is what I do with my life.”

It was Ohio Northern that gave her the skills and confidence to head into the job market, initially as an illustrator with Gibson Greeting Cards, which she worked for five years.

Freelancing consumed the next fifteen years of her life. This allowed her to accept and turn down jobs as she pleased. More importantly, it allowed her to raise her family. Sargent’s two daughters make it a game to pick out their mom’s designs in the store. “I give them a quarter for each one they pick out,” she laughs.

Although freelancing seemed ideal, it had its drawbacks as well. “My studio was my living room,” Sargent says, “so I would never leave my work. I would find myself working on the project night and day until I got it right. That is the most difficult part of my job—not being able to walk away until I capture what my mind’s eye is seeing.”

Apparently Hallmark doesn’t think she has any problem getting it right.

 

 

Corle  and Corle ExhibitThe American Gallery Hosts Exhibition by ONU Graduates
November
—Ohio Northern University alumni Ed Corle (BA ’78) and Laura Barnhardt-Corle (BA ’77) opened their exhibition, “Paintings and Pots,” this past weekend and will continue through Nov. 30 in the American Gallery, 6600 Sylvania Ave. in Sylvania. A reception for the artists was held Saturday, November 14.

The gallery represents many local and regional artists from Ohio, Indiana and Michigan. Owned and operated by Toni Andrews, the American Gallery hosts special monthly exhibits by regional and national artists. This month, the two-person exhibit features functional ceramics by Ed and detailed watercolors by his wife Laura.

The American Gallery also owns a small collection of work that includes paintings, prints, ceramics, sculpture, jewelry, fibers and a large offering of studio glass from the area. Many pieces in the collection, and in the exhibit, are for sale.

Ed is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He graduated from Ohio Northern University and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio.

Laura has exhibited locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

 

 

Harry MelroyFindlay Art League 2009 Juried Show Features ONU Alumni
November
—The Findlay Art League 2009 Juried Show, held in conjunction with the Arts Partnership’s ArtWalk, opened to the public Friday, November 6. Two Ohio Northern University alumni garnered recognition during an awards ceremony held in the Findlay Art League gallery.

The show, opened to artists in the northwest Ohio area, was judged by Dominic Catalano, assistant professor of art education in the school of art at Bowling Green State University. He works professionally as an illustrator of children’s books.

Harry Melroy, a 1971 graduate, earned an honorable mention award for “Three Hungry Dogs,” a graphite and white pencil on paper.

With BA degree in art from Ohio Northern University, Harry currently teaches art at Mohawk junior high school in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught at both the University of Findlay and Tiffin University. Harry has won numerous awards for his work and has recently exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the Mansfield Art Center, Cleveland State University, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

Laura Barnhardt-Corle, a 1977 graduate of Ohio Northern, received honorable mention for “Done Lilies,” a watercolor on paper.

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree in art from ONU, is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area, and teaches eight-week watercolor classes in her studio.

Laura has exhibited locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Admission to the exhibit is free, and open to the public, and runs through Saturday, November 21, 2009. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Thursday, 11a.m.- 2p.m., Friday 5-8p.m., Saturday from 11a.m.-5p.m. and closed Sunday and Monday. The gallery is located at 117 W. Crawford Street in Findlay.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: Three Hungary Dogs, charcoal and white pencil, by Harry Melroy.

 

Harry MelroyONU Alumnus Reveals Creative Process in Exhibit
November
—For many artists, they are committed to a life process of creativity and how that is expressed and manifested in what they do.

For one of Ohio Northern University’s alumni, Harry Melroy (BA ’71) is also passionate about the creative process. During the next two months, the documentation of his commitment to a process of creativity is revealed.

Harry Melroy, along with ONU Professor Melissa Eddings, is included in an exhibit at Bluffton University called “In the Beginning: The Creative Process Revealed.” The show runs from Monday, November 9, through Friday, December 18 in the Grace Albrecht Gallery of Sauder Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Monday–Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m. and Saturday–Sunday, 1p.m. to 5p.m. Admission is free and open to the public.

“In the Beginning: The Creative Process Revealed” is an exhibit of preliminary works by a very diverse group of artists in a variety of mediums. The works in the exhibit reveal the intuitive creative process on its course to a formal, finished piece of art.

Working on a piece from the beginning gives an artist a chance to rethink their creative process and reformat their style. “Many artists consider the preliminary work they do as the most important part of the creative process because it is the first stage of conceptual exploration,” explains Phil Sugden, professor and exhibit curator at Bluffton. “In some cases, it involves creating or revising the artist’s visual language.”

Though Harry describes his process as a little more intuitive than others’ in the show, he said that the subject matter in his artwork comes from many places.

“I do prefer to read histories and biographies,” explains Harry. “Stories of the macabre and fantastic have interested me since childhood.”

“I grew up spellbound by science fiction and horror films. Some people find it strange that my preference in reading material has almost always been non-fiction. It is from this blend of influences that I draw my scenes of surreal images and detached logic.”

“While I never consider what meaning the imagery may have,” said Harry, “I’m certain there is a reason for all the subject selection. No artist, in any medium, works in a totally random fashion or simply pulls things out of nowhere. Nothing comes from a vacuum, imagined or otherwise.”

With an undergraduate degree from Ohio Northern University, Harry currently teaches art at Mohawk junior high school in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught at both the University of Findlay and Tiffin University. Harry has won numerous awards for his work and has recently exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the Mansfield Art Center, Cleveland State University, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the best creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419.772.2160.

image: preliminary sketches, sketchbooks and formal painting “Eviction Notice,” acrylic on canvas by Harry Melroy

 

Dave  HoughtonONU Graduate Featured in First Solo Exhibition
November
—ONU alumnus David Houghton is a self-proclaimed wildlife enthusiast, a nature lover and a mosquito non-lover.

He is also a stay-at-home dad and a business owner. “Both have great rewards and take a lot more time and energy than I ever thought,” professed Dave.

“As an owner and ceramic potter, I am the guy responsible for making the mess in my studio,” explained Dave.

The seemingly disorder of Dave’s studio has produced something worthwhile—his own business and his first solo exhibition of his ceramic work.

The pottery of David Houghton is now on display in the ArtZone Gallery at ArtSpace in Lima, Ohio. The exhibit is open through December.

“This is my first show featuring my wood-fired pottery and salt glazed pottery,” said Dave.

“A lot of my work is hand-thrown and either fired in a salt-glaze kiln or in a wood-fired kiln. Both firing methods produce results that suggest textures found in nature. Wood firing especially creates a variety of textures ranging from rock, bark and moss to the sheen of a quiet pond and flame markings reminiscent of sunsets.”

Dave graduated from Ohio Northern University in 1998 with a BFA degree in art. Professor Emeritus Bruce Chesser, now retired, was Dave’s ceramics instructor as an undergraduate student in the art & design department. Prof. Luke Sheets, now the ceramics instructor at ONU, is also one of Dave’s best friends and mentors.

“The faculty at Ohio Northern provided much more than just a technical education on how to create artwork,” explained Dave. “They were a springboard for self-discovery and direction, both as an artist and as a person.”

After graduation, Dave worked as a graphic designer for Ceramics Monthly, a magazine published in Columbus, Ohio. But, shortly after having children, Dave quit his job and started his own business, Long Pond Pottery.

Dave’s company is located in Cable, Ohio. “My studio is a 12' by 24' built in my garage. I have two wheels, my favorite being a Thomas Stuart electric wheel, a small wedging table, a few sets of shelves and a work table.”

“My business is a couple years old and I owe a big ‘thank you’ to the Ohio Northern faculty, both current and retired, who have continued to support and encourage me during these last few years of getting started,” said Dave. “The art and design department at Ohio Northern University had the facilities and equipment that allowed me to… catch a glimpse of what was possible.”

Admission to the ArtZone Gallery is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10a.m.–5p.m., Saturday, 10a.m.–2p.m. and closed Sunday and Monday. Please contact ArtSpace for additional information (419.222.1721).

ArtSpace/Lima is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing visual arts to the West Central Ohio region including. Its organization occupies a turn-of-the-century three-story brick building in the North West quadrant of Town Square in Downtown Lima, Ohio.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

 

Mike SanataONU Graduate Curates Exhibit of the Artistry and Culture of Automobiles
November—Laura Lofgren, Kent News—For more than 100 years, the automobile has affected the world in significant stages. Whether it is changing the way we get from point A to B, to being a status symbol, to being one of the top reasons for environmental pollution, the vehicle has shaped the world into what it is today, and artists have been there every step to capture it.

Michael Sanata, a third-year graduate student and teaching assistant at Kent State University, has curated the School of Art Gallery's latest show, "Automobile in Art: Beauty in Motion."

The exhibit displays works from several artists, depicting the transition of the automobile from its beginning stages to the 21st century.

“I wanted to show the changing perception of the automobile over the years,” Sanata said.

Into the 1920s, the car, with the exception of the Model T Ford, was only for the wealthy and was seen as a status symbol.

“It was a sign of class and status and wealth," Sanata said.

Through the '30s, '40s and '50s, people became more accepting of the automobile. It brought people closer together; people were no longer isolated to one area.

“The boundaries of the world kind of shrunk," Sanata said. "It was the coming of the idea of 'planned obsolescence.' (The car) became the equivalent of watching TV today. You're in a set spot moving through space."

The middle of the '60s and '70s, Sanata said, was around the time when EPA emissions and safety regulations began to take into account how much pollution cars created.

“The car suddenly became a burden,” Sanata said. "We became dependent on foreign oil. We were no longer self-serving."

Into the decadent 1980s and 1990s, the car regained its symbol status.

Now people understand the severe impact on the environment that vehicles have had and are taking steps to reverse the damaging effects.

“Today, the vehicle is art,” Sanata said.

The biggest piece in Sanata's exhibit is a 1960 Austin Healey 300 Mark I VT7, which is the centerpiece of the show.

Other works include those of Kent State professors, Andy Warhol, Edward Hopper and photographer Zoltan Glass.

The piece by Glass depicts a nude female on top of a Mercedes-Benz.

"This ties in with the notion that the automobile was compared to the woman's body," Sanata said. "The idea of driving the car was associated with the idea of sex. Getting to the car and driving it was a sexual innuendo. The back was the woman's behind and the front, her arms or breasts."

The main message Sanata said he wants to get across to viewers is how the art world works with the outside world.

"I want people to see how perception changes over time," he said.

Sanata graduated with a BFA degree in art/graphic design in 2004 from Ohio Northern University. Since then, he has worked as a free-lance photographer with interest in vintage automobile racing for car magazines.

"The Automobile in Art: Beauty in Motion" exhibit will run until Nov. 20. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 11a.m. to 5p.m. For details, call the school’s art gallery: 330-672-7853.

image: ONU art/graphic design graduate Michael Sanata at his recent gallery opening.

 

Phil  ShipeFrom Coaching to Fine Art: 1934 ONU alumnus continues to paint
October
—Whether the setting was a gymnasium, a football field, or an art studio, Phil Shipe (BA ’34) has always found life and the people around him interesting. Something of a philosopher, Shipe looked back over the choices, the events, and the people he met in his 83 years and decided they added up to some satisfying memories.

He attended Simon Gratz high school in Philadelphia, a large school with 5,000 students in the upper three grades. It was so big, he says, “I was there for two years before I ever saw the girl I would marry, Mary Pemberton Freed.”

After high school graduation, Shipe had academic decisions to make. He had lost out on a football scholarship at Penn State because of a high school football injury, but he had also been offered a scholarship to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. His love for athletics won over art as a career, and he turned down the art scholarship.

The country was entering the period of the “Great Depression.” Decisions had to be made with finances in mind, so Shipe decided to look for a small college with a tuition he could afford. The most important qualification was that it offered a major in physical education.

At his Methodist Church, he found information on Ohio Northern. Shipe says he had never been west of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania so Ada, Ohio seemed “way out west.” But the Pennsylvania railroad went through the town and the Lincoln Highway was close so he could hitchhike home. In the kind of quip his friends wait for, he told a reporter, “The cultured East sent missionaries to Ohio, men like Johnny Appleseed, Anthony Wayne, and Phil Shipe.”

When he looks back on his Ohio Northern years, he decides, “I ran into some very fine people.” He remembers President Williams “who greatly impressed me,” and his English professor, Dr. C.H. Freeman, who “was an outstanding teacher.” Of his coaches, Clyde and Harris Lamb, he says, “If I’d looked the world over, I don’t think I could have found two better people to be associated with for four years in athletics.”

He was an active student, playing football and participating in track. A class officer, president of the Y.M.C.A. and a member of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity, Phil has some good memories of faculty and students he met during his four years at ONU.

After graduation in 1934, the country was deeper into the depression and jobs were scarce. The Lamb brothers loaned him their Fords so he could look for a job. He says he must have covered 2,500 miles before he found a teaching job in Fulton County at a little town named Ai (pronounced A-eye).

When he reported for work in Ai, he found he was the principal as well as the teacher for six subjects, including art, and the coach for all boys’ and girls’ sports. His salary was $975 a year, and he paid $7 a week for room, board, and laundry. The only catch was that he had to share the room and the bed with the superintendent. “Never thought I’d say I slept with a superintendent,” he says.

Phil ShipeThe next year, he married “Pem,” the girl he met in the Philadelphia high school halls. It’s evident that was a wise decision for the Shipes have celebrated a 58th wedding anniversary. Their first home was a farmhouse without plumbing or electricity, but at least Phil could leave the bed he shared with the superintendent, “a great guy,” but he snored.

Fremont, Ohio, where he was an assistant football coach, was a one-year stop for the Shipes. Phil wanted the chance to be a head football coach and when he heard the coaching job was open at Ada, he applied and was hired. In Fremont, he had met the brother of the superintendent whose bed he had shared in Ai. After he told Clinton Roberson that the principal’s job in Ada was open, the Robersons’ and Shipes’ belongings came to Ada in the same moving van. The Roberson Boys, Randall and Arden, were part of the exodus from Fremont. Later, Arden “Stretch” became the ONU football coach.

For Shipe, Ada was like homecoming. When he was an ONU athlete, he and his roommate, Hadley Watts, had formed a sports club for some Ada grade school boys who hung around outside their fraternity house. Now, Shipe was the football coach and some of those boys had grown up and were part of his high school team. He calls the Ada experience, “another good three years with a great group of young people.”

It was at Ada that Shipe recalls, “I first talked my way out of having a study hall.” Mr. Floyd, the superintendent, let him start an art class instead. When he coached at Defiance, he started another art class and avoided another study hall. He thinks that at both schools, it was the first art department they had.

After earning a master’s degree and most of a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania, serving for two years on Navy ammunition ships in World War II, and returning for another three years at Defiance high school, he went to the College of Wooster as a coach in 1949. Shipe says most of his football players were in college because of the “G.I. Bill” and many of them, he says “had more combat experience than I had.” It was “like moving into the pros.”

The Wooster experience lasted for 30 years, as head football coach for 17 years, wrestling coach for 25, golf coach, teacher of physical education and a teacher in the freshman colloquium program. He retired in 1979. For Shipe, it was another great period in his life “spent with some fine people.”

When Shipe retired from the College of Wooster, some of the athletes he had on his teams in 25 years as wrestling coach started a collection for a fund they named “The Phil Shipe Go-To-Sea Fund.” Now for 12 summers, Phil and his wife, Pem, often accompanied by some of those fine people in their past, have gone to sea off the coast of Maine on a windjammer. The week of wind and sea are a time of adventure and reflection. The rest of the time Phil paints. On an earlier trip in 1967 to the east coast, that draws him to old ships and the sea, Phil encountered another influence on his life.

In 1966, he read a book review of “The Ringing of Bells,” by Eric Sloane, noted American painter, writer, and philosopher. Sloane advocated the ringing of bells on the Fourth of July instead of fireworks, believing that vibrations from bells were more positive than the sound of gun powder. He noted the use of bells in America since the ringing of the Liberty Bell and had convinced Congress to sign a proclamation asking people across America to ring bells at the same hour on the Fourth.

In 1967, the Shipes were in Mystic seaport on the Fourth of July when the bells rang. It reminded Phil of Eric Sloane, and he called him at his home. Sloane’s invitation to visit his barn studio was the beginning of a friendship that lasted until Sloane’s death in 1985.

Shipe says that Sloane not only gave him guidance for his art but “for general living.” Sharing Sloanes’ philosophy about art, he often paints ships, barns, and old churches from the American past, not to evoke a feeling of nostalgia, but to recreate an awareness of the spirit of that past.

His art studio, added to the house where he and Pem live in Wooster, reflects his interests all things connected with the sea and the ships; walls covered with paintings; tubes of paint and brushes; canvas and the barn siding he often uses instead of canvas. If anyone asks, he says he’s a painter. He tells everyone, “I don’t want to insult the art department by calling myself an artist.”

Shipe likes to paint what people ask him to paint. Even though he works quickly, sometimes the commissions pile up in the studio.

Sales from some of his dog and cat paintings have benefited humane societies. For the past number of years, he’s donated a painting for the Christmas cards sold as a fund raiser for the Wayne County hospice organization.

Hospice is a support group that allows terminally ill people to spend their remaining days at home surrounded by families and friends. Shipe has a great respect for this group. He says, “These people and their loved ones are facing one of the great mysteries, death, and they need our help.”

Shipe has received many awards in his years of teaching and coaching. He was given a place of honor in the ONU athletic Hall of Fame in 1976, and his paintings were given a show in the Elzay Art Gallery during Alumni Weekend in 1985.

Perhaps the most satisfying memories when he looks back over the years include some of “those fine people” he has met. Those people form an army of Phil Shipe fans, who with respect and affection, remember his influence on their lives.

 

Amy CorleFrom Intern to Director: Ohio Northern Alumna Serves as Director of Visitors’ Services for Nation’s Largest Contemporary Art Museum
July 2009—
Ohio Northern’s art and design program has served as a foundation for hundreds of careers affiliated with the arts. With alumni all over the world, it’s no wonder that they bring leadership and foresight to their professions. For one alumna, ONU certainly was the right choice for her.

“The flexibility of the independent study program in art allowed me to explore a museum career as an intern,” says Amy Corle (BFA ’88). “When I graduated, the position directly lead to a job with the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, that I still enjoy today.”

“I had a great internship experience at MCA,” explains Amy. “It was an exciting time. There was so much going on, including the beginning stages of a new building. Jeff Koons and Nancy Spero, some of the most famous contemporary artists of our time, were installing work at the Museum. And who could ever forget the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition.”

Amy is the director of visitor services and manager of internal marketing at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. She hires, trains and supervises a 17-member staff in front-desk admissions, information, box office, and many other services. She’s also developing a customer service manual for the security staff.

Since her humbling beginnings at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, she has witnessed the Museum’s rapid expansion. In July 1996, the museum moved to a new building more than five times larger than its previous site. The staff grew from 75 to 200. “We still try to maintain a small, friendly feeling for visitors,” explains Amy.

To keep herself fresh and in touch with her staff’s capacity and the public’s needs, she tries to work on the floor as much as possible. One full day a week, she serves as floor manager. The rest of the week she spends up to three hours a day filling-in for employees who are absent.

“In the old building, it was easy to provide customer service because it was so small,” remembered Amy Corle, who became visitor services manager at the time of the move. “People walked up to the front desk all the time to talk about the art. People still do that in the new building, but we have to work harder to keep the feeling of intimacy and accessibility.”

“Part of my job is to make sure that every employee understands that anyone who enters the museum must be made to feel welcome,” says Amy. “Attention to visitor service is the key to our success.”

Contemporary art can be challenging for some visitors entering the Museum. “We know that visitors may have difficulties grappling with [some of the art],” explains Amy. “They must not be hampered in their consideration of the art by distractions or discomforts. We try to make the visit as nice and easy as possible, because the art often isn’t like that.”

Amy also testifies that she works with some wonderful, experienced people in her field. “Fortunately, we have some top-notch professionals working at the Museum. Our director, Madeleine Grynsztejn, joined the museum in 2008 after serving at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She wants the museum to be open and accessible and visitors to feel comfortable and well-treated.”

One way the museum increases its accessibility is by staying open late on Tuesdays and making admission free for the entire day. “Even though we won’t be collecting admission then, it would be wrong to think we need fewer staff on duty,” says Amy. “We attract more people and there are a lot of first-time visitors who have questions and need help.”

“We even have a concierge-like service,” explains Amy. “If a visitor asks for directions to a restaurant, we’d like our front desk staff to not only provide the information, but offer to call and make a reservation,” she said. “We want to provide outstanding service to strengthen the visitor’s connection to the museum, but we also see ourselves as contributing to tourism in the city.”

The contemporary art itself sometimes prompts strong reactions from visitors, according to Amy. “The biggest, most frequent complaint we get is about the art. Some people will say it’s not art, it’s a hoax or something’s offensive to them.”

To handle the complaints, she said the staff had to learn more about conflict resolution and how to handle people who are upset. “We listen and empathize without agreeing,” she explained. “We might say something like ‘I’m sorry you’re so upset and I’ll share your comments with the rest of the staff.’ Then we’ll offer them a comment card so they can put their feelings in their own words.”

“We do everything we can to appease them,” she continued. “If they want, we give them their money back, and we give free passes for future shows. We will also offer them a free audio tour if they’re at all receptive to learning more about the work and possibly hearing the artist talk about it in his or her own words.”

Amy also needs to work with the visitor services staff to prepare them for public reaction to difficult work. “The front-of-house staff tours each exhibition with the curator,” clarifies Amy. “It’s essential that they have a basic understanding of the exhibition, and if there are difficult objects or aspects to the show, the public relations department works with them on developing responses.”

Not too long ago, the museum did prepare to open what they expected would be a controversial exhibition for some visitors. The show of works by Charles Ray featured a dozen nude mannequins. “With an exhibition like this,” said Amy, “we talk extensively about whether or not to alert visitors to the content of the show before they enter. We have to balance our interest in preserving the artist’s freedom of expression and the sensitivities of families.” On occasion, she said, the museum has put signs outside galleries stating that the exhibition includes some material that may not be appropriate for young visitors.

In such instances, Amy says, when anyone arrives with children, the staff will suggest they preview the exhibition before bringing in the children. “People appreciate the warning,” she said. “Sometimes the adults will take turns viewing the show, while steering the kids to the permanent collection. Parents may want to introduce their children to contemporary art, but they don’t want to be surprised.”

The Museum of Contemporary Art is one of the nation’s largest facilities devoted to contemporary art. Founded in 1945, the museum offers innovative and compelling programs along with works of art where the public can directly experience the ideas of living artists.

“It is indeed a privilege for me to work at MCA,” said Amy. “I am grateful to those involved in my education at Ohio Northern in making it possible for me to do an internship here.”

 

Dan OverlyBlight to Beauty: ONU alumnus spends nine years creating paradise
August
—Time has faded. So, too, has the wondering.

Dan Overly, 64, no longer plays the “what if?” game.

But he could.

What if he had continued with his own painting and sculpturing instead of dropping everything at the request of Gov. Bill Waller in 1972 to form and nurture the Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi, now more than 400 strong?

What if the car he was driving hadn't been rear-ended at a red light in 1981, knocking him under the dashboard and setting off a chain of health problems?

What if, at the age of 55, the onset of what now has been diagnosed as congestive heart failure hadn't forced him into an assisted living apartment complex in north Jackson - where most of the residents were 30 years older?

Instead, he revels in the beauty and gift of every sunrise. And he enjoys the magic of perhaps his last piece of art - a garden that stretches across the back property line of his shared residence and takes the breath of those who walk through this 120-foot-long piece of paradise created over the past nine years.

It is filled with every kind of plant and tree imaginable, from bamboo to nandinas, from willows to oaks. Strategic pathways provide a sense of wonderment ... just what is around the next turn?

Overly, who often has trouble with his balance because of the heart disease's tightening grip, stands in what he considers the center of his real life brush stroke. He lifts a kettle from atop a smoldering chiminea, shakily pours himself a cup of tea, then eases into a wood chair.

“What a nice place,” he says, “to spend the end of your life.”

It would be easy for Overly to be angry.

At the time of the accident, he resided on a former plantation off Old Agency Road in Ridgeland.

“It was out in the boondocks back then,” he says, recalling that in 1981 County Line Road consisted of one convenience store and a lot of pasture land. Ridgeland had not experienced the flight from Jackson, or the construction of Northpark mall.

Dan OverlyOverly lived alone in a small three-bedroom house that once served as slave quarters. He developed a 25-acre Japanese garden so splendid that author, gardener and adviser to the British Royal Family - the late Rosemary Verey of London - included Overly’s masterpiece in her 1994 book, Secret Gardens Revealed By Their Owners. Overly’s was one of only two American gardens featured. But the wreck changed his tranquil life.

"It was like sticking your toe in tar and you can't get loose," he says.

He underwent back surgery, after which he had to learn to walk again. He was eventually diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and then his heart condition.

In 2000, he moved into the Meadow Ridge apartment complex. "I wasn't thrilled about it," he says, "but it was the only sensible thing to do."

As soon as he settled in, Overly was disturbed by what he saw when he looked at the back of the property. Among the things cluttering his view: 32 school bus tires, piles of broken concrete, shattered windshields.

"It was a dump," says Donna Yowell, executive director of the Mississippi Urban Forestry Council and a longtime friend. "People who see the garden now cannot imagine how much work it took to get it the way Dan has it now."

With his health condition, Overly could only do a little at a time. But he was determined. The apartment complex helped him find a company to haul away the tires. Many of the chunks of concrete now line the garden's walk ways. Friends gave him cuttings of plants. He bought some on his own.

Nine years after its inception, the garden is eye-popping to first-time visitors and veteran gardeners alike.

Overly tends to it every day, body willing. Other residents walk through it or sit and read.

"Privacy is a concern, no matter where you live," he says. "I'm glad I've been able to provide that not only for myself but for anyone else who lives here and might want to take advantage of it."

A native of Ohio, Overly came to Mississippi in 1970 after earning degrees in art and biology from Ohio Northern University.

"I was working with a consulting firm that developed curriculums for middle schools," he says. "They sent me to Greenwood. I was supposed to be there two weeks, and I ended up staying. I liked the people. And Greenwood has a very strong arts community that really caught my eye."

He earned a master's degree in art education from Delta State University in 1972. He also taught at DSU and had a small studio in nearby Boyle, where he painted, sculpted and dabbled in stain glass.

That is when Gov. Waller asked him to develop the Craftsmen's Guild.

"I was worried at first that I couldn't find enough people," Overly says. "But Mississippi is amazing. You shake the bushes, and a lot of talented artists fall out."

Overly chuckles as he recalls the day Waller introduced him to the top executives of 45 state agencies.

"I was wearing orange and black shoes, some cutoff khakis and a blue T-shirt. Had hair down to my shoulders. I'm sure people wondered, 'Where in the world did this guy come from and what is he doing here?' " Overly says. "But Gov. Waller said, 'If Dan calls you, call him back yourself. Don't get someone else to do it. And whatever he needs, make sure he gets it.'

"And they did. It worked out beautifully."

His health issues forced Overly to resign from the Guild in 1987.

"Dan sacrificed his own interests, his own work, for the good of Mississippi," says Claudia Cartee, a professional clay artist since 1970 in Seminary. "The Guild became his baby. Dan knew how and where to find artists. It was amazing to watch him assemble such a diverse group of artists. I have so much respect for what he's done."

Many do. Overly was honored with the 1996 Governor's Award for art partnership.

Robert, his dad, was a civil engineer. Mom Jane worked as a newspaper reporter. One of two children, Overly went to college to become a dentist. "But my mom said one day, 'For someone who wants to be a dentist, you sure are taking a lot of art classes.' I was drawn to the arts without even knowing it."

He gives credit to a neighbor, whom he remembers only as "Aunt Abby."

"She taught me to garden," Overly says. "When she got too old, I became her knees and hands. And if I ever pulled up an interesting plant by mistake, she would never yell at me. She would say, 'Oh, I should have told you about that.' It was never my fault."

Those memories - and the love of gardening - comfort him now.

"This is me," he says, sipping his tea. "It's how I relate to the world.

"The plants and flowers keep me alive. You can get so down and feel so bad. But the next morning the pickleweed are going to bloom, and it makes you want to make it one more day."

 

Boise Art  MuseumIt’s All “Kids Stuff” for ONU Graduate
June
—Work by many artists are characterized for their innovative and influential brilliance. For one ONU graduate, Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72) also has something in common with one of the world’s most significant artists. She is featured alongside with Alexander Calder in a new exhibit called “Kid Stuff” at the Boise Art Museum in Idaho.

“Kid Stuff” is an exhibition that explores the joy and excitement in the kid in everyone. The exhibit includes two- and three-dimensional objects in which artists reflect on the memories of childhood as well as objects and images of interest to children.

The artwork selected for the show is from the Boise Art Museum’s Permanent Collection and local, private collections. This whimsical exhibition also includes artists Craig Cully, Deborah Barrett, Michael Corney, David Gilhooly, Benjamin Jones and many others.

Working primarily as a clay sculpture artist, and in many situations as an installation artist, Lysohir’s versatility becomes apparent in “Chocolate Cake with Chile and Fish,” the work on display in “Kid Stuff.”

Examining Lysohir’s work, one art critic, stated, “Her ideas transcend those traditionally expected of ceramics.” Yet, another art critic mentioned, “Enigmas multiply into a complex epic when all sections in Lysohir’s installation are read as one, and what is at first intellectually confounding becomes at least emotionally concrete, much in the way a symphony is understood more by the heart than the head.”

“Kid Stuff” opens this month and runs through November 15. Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10a.m. to 5p.m.; first Thursday of every month, 10a.m. to 9p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5p.m.; and closed on Mondays.

The Boise Art Museum (BAM) is the only American Association of Museums (AAM) accredited art museum in the State of Idaho. BAM plays a leadership role in the cultural life of its community through a growing Permanent Collection which focuses on regional and national artwork, nationally acclaimed exhibitions and an education program that reaches more than 13,000 students each year.

Lysohir’s work can be seen in most major ceramic texts and has been exhibited in many venues in the United States as well as in Canada, Denmark and Venezuela. In 2003, Lysohir was featured the “21st Century Ceramics in the United States and Canada” exhibition, which offered an extensive survey of the best of the top professional North American ceramists.

Born in 1950 in Sharon, PA, Lysohir studied at Ohio Northern University, at the Centro Internazionale Di Studi in Verona Italy (1970-71) and at Washington State University (MFA in 1979). She has taught at various schools such as the Kansas City Art Institute, the Ohio State University and New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In 2000, she was a visiting artist in residence at Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

image: The Boise Art Museum’s main entrance, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, ID, 83702

 

Kyle HotzONU Alumnus Kyle Hotz’s Second Edition of “Dark Reign” To Make It’s Debut
June
—Every month, from Spider-man to Wolverine, Marvel Comics publishes an assortment of comics. One of those comics reaching stores this week is the highly anticipated miniseries, Dark Reign: The Hood, illustrated by ONU graduate Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93).

This Wednesday marks the debut of Hotz’s second edition of the comic Dark Reign: The Hood. The first issue was published last month by Marvel Comics and now features the villain in a new frame of mind.

Working for almost a year in his studio, Hotz labored over sketches and comprehensives for his next assignment. “All the hard work pays off once I see the book published,” said Hotz. “I did the penciling and inking. I usually don’t see the color until it’s in print.”

Jeff Parker, the writer for the series, had several reasons why he was delighted to have worked with Hotz. “I liked the consistency it brings for Kyle to be back on the character.” Hotz created the character in the 2002 MAX limited series The Hood. Even with a new comic edition, his take on the character hasn’t changed much.

“It was cool to see him break out new artistic tricks here a few years later,” the writer stated. “Of course it’s really cool to just see him draw that hood and cape fluttering around.”

This edition of the Dark Reign: The Hood is receiving praise from many critics, both for storyline and the art. The story has taken a few twists and Hotz has intensified his illustrative skills.

“Parker was helped quite a bit by artist Kyle Hotz, who also drew the original mini-series,” said Matthew Brady of Comics Bulletin. “Hotz has an interesting, somewhat cartoony, exaggerated style, lending the evil doings here an outsized feel. Pages are full of gnarled tree branches, curling smoke, and wrinkled fabric, which looks pretty neat on the Hood’s cloak. It’s the ideal atmosphere for a comic about bad dudes and their bad deeds.”

Daniel Crown of Sign Comics also previewed the new edition of Dark Reign. “To me, this was much more interesting than a simple thug’s ascension into a position of power. And thanks in large part to Hotz’s outstanding return to the character he helped create, this issue proved a more than worthy follow up to what was perhaps Vaughan’s most underrated story… There is plenty to like here, even for the character’s biggest detractors.”

“Hotz brings some great artwork to the table here,” said Adam Chapman of Comixtreme. “The illustrations have a clear, clean art-style, which actually looks better in this issue than it previously did back in the first The Hood miniseries. Crisp and clean, the art tells the story very effectively and simply.”

With the books packaged and shipped, it’s evident that the second edition of Dark Reign: The Hood has gained notoriety. According to Chapman, “A great start to what should be a really interesting and enjoyable mini-series.”

Hotz has worked as an illustrator and writer of comic books since 1991. His work has appeared in a series published by Marvel Comics (Periscope Studios), DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics. He has completed work on Marvel’s Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: The Osborn Journal, The Man-Thing and The Hood under Marvel’s MAX Comics imprint. Often referred to as the “master of macabre,” Hotz created Mosaic in 1999 under Sirius, his first written and illustrated graphic novel. Other horror titles Hotz has worked on include Ghost Ride, Zombie, Criminal Macabre and Evil Ernie. In 2007 at DC Comics, his work won a Young Adult Library Services Association Award (Great Graphic Novels for Teens) for Bill the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities.

image: illustration from Dark Reign: The Hood by Kyle Hotz

 

Jingdezhen Ceramic InstituteA Journey To Study Ceramics in the Porcelain Center of the World
June
—With the brilliant spectacle of the Beijing Olympics now in the past, Abigail Mosbarger (BFA ’07) decided that it was time to make her first visit to China.

“I will be leaving this month as a graduate student to Jingdezhen, China,” explained Abigail. “I will be traveling almost everyday, but, I will be mostly studying at the only fine arts ceramic college in China called Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute.”

Ceramics have been produced for over 1,800 years in the city of Jingdezhen when the Emperor Zhenzong decreed that Changnanzhen, as the city was know then, should produce all of the porcelain used by the Imperial Court during the Jingde Period (1004-1007). The ceramic industry continued to develop there during the Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties. Today, Jingdezhen is a recognized center of porcelain production.

“I am interested in attending the Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute because it is the premier academic program for ceramic arts in all of Asia,” said Abigail. “Because of the school’s history and location, it is considered the ‘Porcelain Capital of the World.’ It also has the largest and most comprehensive group of faculty and staff that continue to teach both ancient and contemporary craft techniques.” According to JCI, over 1,100 faculty and staff are employed at the university.

Abigail indicated that the Institute is responsible for placing more ceramic artist/teachers in programs throughout China, as well as Western institutions, than any other program.

The Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute is a unique ceramic university located in Jingdezhen, China. The school is one of the 31 national universities which has the authority to offer bachelor degrees in art and is one of 94 universities that has the authority to offer Chinese Government scholarships to international students pursuing master and bachelor degrees.

Based on the School of Ceramics founded in 1909, the Institute was reconstructed and renamed in 1958. With nearly 50 years of development, the Institute has turned into a professional, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary higher education institute for ceramics, devoted mainly to ceramic science as well as the liberal arts, business administration, economics, natural sciences, education and law.

The Institute is now well-known in the national and international ceramic area as an important teaching, research and culture exchange in the art, design and the engineering of ceramics.

A great importance is placed on international exchanges. Cooperative agreements have been established with over 20 countries including the United States, Japan, South Korea, England, Canada, and Finland and with many professional associations such as the National Council on Education in the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) in the United States.

At present, the Institute has 32 undergraduate programs and 23 postgraduate programs. The organization of the Institute consists of 11 schools and departments: School of Material Science and Engineering, School of Art & Design, School of Mechanical & Electronic Engineering, School of Business Administration, School of Information Engineering, Department of Thermal Engineering, Department of Foreign Language, Department of Social Science and Physical Education Department, adult education school and a sub-Institute—Science & Technology and Art Institute.

The Institute has two major campuses which stretches 350 acres. Enrollment reaches over 15,000 students from all over the country and has already enrolled more than 1,000 international students since 1958 when the university was established.

A unique aspect of the JCI is the series of science platforms in the ceramic area. A few of these centers include the Ceramic Culture Research Center of China, the Ceramic Intellectual Property and Information Center of China, and the China Ceramic Research Center. The Institute is also preparing to establish the Product Design Center for Chinese Ceramics and the China Center for the Research of Ceramic Industrial Economics.

AbigailCurrently, Abigail teaches art at Del Valle High School located in Austin, Texas. “I primarily teach a class called Art 1,” describes Abigail. “I teach an insane amount of high school students a day—about 200 kids. But I love it. I go to graduate school. I live in a cool city and feel very loved by the people around me.”

The course taught by Abigail engages students in creative and visual communication skills. “We use a variety of different art materials and artistic techniques. Students explore the elements and principles of art as well develop an appreciation for the fine arts. Although primarily a studio course, we do integrate art history, aesthetics, art vocabulary, and criticism.”

“I can’t wait to tell my students about my travels and studies in China,” Abigail exuberantly stated. “I’ve created a blog to write about my experiences. I cannot promise to update it daily, but I certainly will try. I don’t know what kind of access to electricity and the Internet I will actually have, but I will try my best to get to the major cities.”

Abigail has already posted her itinerary to her blog. She leaves for China on June 15 and will arrive in Jingdezhen on July 2.

Looking back at her years at Ohio Northern, Abigail stated, “I felt very luck to have gone to ONU. I knew that I wanted to study art and design. I had the passion for educating and teaching children. And along with this passion, I knew that the faculty in the art department possessed that same passion. That was the deciding factor for me to study there.”

 

 

Marilyn LysohirONU Alumna Selected for 2009 Clay Invitational
June
—The Art Spirit Gallery, located in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, held its Annual Clay Invitational in May. The exhibition, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, showcased a broad swath of regional artists whose excellence in ceramic arts was as varied as the pieces on display. While one artist may have emphasized glazing, firing or finishing techniques while another may have demonstrated unique construction. For ONU graduate Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72), she used form to explore ideas and narratives.

This year, Marilyn was selected for the “10th Anniversary Clay Invitational” held May 8–30. She was one of 17 artists invited to exhibit recent work for this regional competition.

Most work in the show were functional pieces, varied in size, shape and color. But Marilyn’s work was distinctive and prominent.

“Marilyn invested a personal narrative into her figurative works,” stated one reviewer. “There was a stoic wistfulness to her most recent figurines, which stand sentinel-like, white porcelain dolls with a girdle of appliqué flowers beneath a sheer, fabric A-line skirt.”

The Art Spirit Gallery, located on 415 Sherman Avenue, held gallery hours between Tuesday–Saturday, 11a.m.–6p.m.

Marilyn’s work can be seen in most major ceramic texts and has been exhibited in many venues in the United States as well as in Canada, Denmark and Venezuela. In 2003, Marilyn was featured the “21st Century Ceramics in the United States and Canada” exhibition, which offered an extensive survey of the best of the top professional North American ceramists.

Born in 1950 in Sharon, PA, Marilyn studied at Ohio Northern University, at the Centro Internazionale Di Studi in Verona Italy (1970-71) and at Washington State University (MFA in 1979). She has taught at various schools such as the Kansas City Art Institute, the Ohio State University and New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In 2000, she was a visiting artist in residence at Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design.

image: Stella, 2009, clay and cloth, 26 x 9 x 7

Department of Art & Design

Ann Hood

419-772-2160
b-hood@onu.edu
Wilson Art Building
525 South Main Street
Ada, Ohio 45810
Monday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed