Skip To Main Content
Skip To Main Content

A&D Alumni News

Alumni News: 2008–09

Harry MelroyONU Alumnus in Ohio Juried Exhibit at Mansfield Art Center
May
—An exhibit that showcases established artists from around the State of Ohio, the May Show at the Mansfield Art Center attracts some of the best emerging artists in the region. And this year is no exception. ONU alumnus Harry Melroy’s (BA ’71) work is featured in this prestigious show.

According to the Mansfield Art Center Executive Director Paul Kemerling, “This event provides a professional forum for Ohio artists, a function once performed by shows at the Cleveland and Columbus Museum of Art. So, many artists view this show as a significant exhibition.”

“We’ve had a really impressive response from artists who want to participate in the event,” said Mary Cabrera, the Art Center’s outreach coordinator. “The call for entries brought in around 300 submissions, up 40 percent from past years. It was very competitive.”

With an undergraduate degree from Ohio Northern University, Harry currently teaches art at Mohawk junior high school in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at both the University of Findlay and Tiffin University. Harry has won numerous awards for his work and has recently exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

Though he prefers to read histories and biographies, Harry said the subject matter in his artwork comes from many places.

“Stories of the macabre and fantastic have interested me since childhood,” explained Harry. “I grew up spellbound by science fiction and horror films. Some people find it strange that my preference in reading material has almost always been non-fiction. It is from this blend of influences that I draw my scenes of surreal images and detached logic.”

One of Harry’s accepted works is “Glue Pot,” an acrylic on canvas.

“While I never consider what meaning the imagery may have,” said Harry, “I’m certain there is a reason for all the subject selection. No artist, in any medium, works in a totally random fashion or simply pulls things out of nowhere. Nothing comes from a vacuum, imagined or otherwise.”

When asked whether people understand his work, Harry shrugs-off the notion. “While some viewers are troubled by these paintings and drawings that seem to make no sense, I am very comfortable with all the ambiguity that really helps to define the work,” Melroy stated. “I really want people to be able to say, ‘I like the work, even if I don’t get it or understand it.’ ”

The exhibition was juried by Dr. Martin Ball, a professor of painting at Kent State University. Dr. Ball is a painter who has a conceptual approach to the uses of abstraction. He earned his graduate degree from the Royal College of Art, London in 1973. Martin has an extensive international exhibition record having solo shows in New York, London, Chicago, Boston and Cleveland, and was included in the first British Art Show and The Presence of Painting, a survey of 30 years of British abstraction. Regionally he has exhibited at MoCA, Cleveland and participated in The NEO Show, at the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2005.

The Mansfield Art Center is Central Ohio’s leading organization for the arts. The award winning building is located on eight and a half acres of wooded meadow.

Since 1945 The Mansfield Art Center has engaged the community with the aim of driving, and participating in, the improvement of community life. The Center’s exhibitions programming has evolved to address a broad range of contemporary social, political and cultural concerns, and has consistently provided a focus for educational and outreach programming. These exhibitions embrace historical and contemporary art, and present a diversity of artists and artistic practices.

The 64th Annual May Show at the Mansfield Art Center is open to the public until May 29. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11a.m. until 5p.m. and Sundays, noon until 5p.m.

A closing reception will be held Friday, May 29. The Center will host the Multi-Media Art Explosion at 7p.m. to midnight at the 700 Marion Ave. gallery. In addition to viewing the May Show, guests can enjoy live music and dance, a film festival, performance art and refreshments.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

image: Glue Pot, acrylic on canvas by Harry Melroy.

 

Marilyn LysohirOne Hundred Years of Art
May
—ONU graduate Marilyn Lysohir (BA ’72) and her husband Ross Coates from Moscow, Idaho, are the featured artists of the month at The Bank Left Gallery in Palouse, Washington.

This mixed media exhibit will run from May 2–30 with an opening reception on May 2 from 1–5p.m. During the reception, Lauren Rosenkranz, cellist, and guitarist Mike Edmondson will perform from 1–3p.m.

With a combined 100 years of professional practice between them, Marilyn’s art career has spanned over 40 years, and Ross has been creating art for more than six decades.

Marilyn manages to juggle two successful careers—an artist as well as an entrepreneur. She claims that clay is her preferred medium. “My work is inspired by my family and my friends. When I begin a piece, I start with a personal idea—such as the death of my grandmother or my father surviving World War II, and then this idea evolves into a formal composition which usually takes me a long time to work out.”

Her work can be seen in most major ceramic texts and has been exhibited in many venues in the United States as well as in Canada, Denmark and Venezuela. In 2003, Marilyn was featured the “21st Century Ceramics in the United States and Canada” exhibition, which offered an extensive survey of the best of the top professional North American ceramists.

“I enjoy working with large scale installations which often take more than one year to make,” explains Marilyn. “The largest has been The Dark Side of Dazzle which has a 24’ long, two ton ceramic battleship and a life-sized bathroom and figure in it. This piece was inspired by my father and by friends who fought and survived in different wars.”

Born in 1950 in Sharon, PA, Marilyn studied at Ohio Northern University (B.A. in 1972), at the Centro Internazionale Di Studi in Verona Italy (1970-71) and at Washington State University (M.F.A. in 1979). She has taught at various schools such as the Kansas City Art Institute, the Ohio State University and New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In 2000, she was a visiting artist in residence at Ohio Northern University’s department of art & design.

“For me as an artist, any piece is about self-recognition and communication and memory. It’s about taking responsibility for our actions and surviving with dignity the journey upon which all humans embark...from birth to death.”

The Bank Left Gallery is opened Wednesday-Friday, noon-5p.m., Saturday, noon-8p.m. and Sunday, noon-4p.m.

The gallery is a regional arts gallery located in the Old Bank Building in downtown Palouse, Washington. It features a high quality selection of art and fine craft from artists around the world.

image: Tattooed Dresses, each 24" high, clay, 1996 by Marilyn Lysohir

 

nettie.Findlay Merchant To Feature Work by Emerging Artist
May
—Painting and printmaking work by Ohio Northern University alumna Annette Strabble (a.k.a. nettie.) will be on display at The Wine Merchant, 540 S. Main St., Findlay, through the month of June. Nettie will be the third of many local artists who will exhibit work on a rotating basis at the downtown business. Her exhibit will consist of about 13 paintings and five linoleum prints, all of which will be available for purchase.

A gallery opening and reception will be held Friday, June 5, 5–7p.m. at The Wine Merchant.

Nettie earned her BFA in studio arts in 2002 from ONU and a Web design diploma in 2009 from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.

“First and foremost, I am a painter,” declares Nettie. “I like creating, being inspired and inspiring others to be creative.”

Describing her work, Nettie explains, “I am an artist who works in a variety of different media. I appreciate the simplicity of shapes, the bright colors an imagination can portray… I enjoy the depth a brushstroke creates, the enthusiasm of a blank canvas and the demand of a hard black line.”

Business owner Dan Matheny is excited to be hosting these exhibitions by local arts. “This is the third show and reception we’ve hosted. And each event, so far, showcased ONU graduates’ work. We are thrilled that Nettie has agreed to display her work in our store and gallery area. She certainly is a talented artists.”

Nettie has exhibited locally and regionally. Her work has been accepted in numerous shows including the Wassenberg Spring Juried Show, the Findlay Art League Juried Exhibition, the MadLab Gallery in Columbus and ArtSpace Gallery in Lima.

image: acrylic on canvas, Men Working, 2007

 

Harry MelroyOhio Northern Alumni Accepted into Findlay Art League’s May Show
May
—Always colorful and thought provoking, the Findlay Art League’s “May Show” drew a large crowd during the weekend. And once again, Ohio Northern University was well represented at this year’s exhibit.

Junior art/art education major Julie Brewer, senior graphic design major Steve Gill, and ONU graduates Harry Melroy (BA ’71), Ed Corle (BA ’78) and Laura Barnhardt-Corle (BFA ’77) were among the artists accepted into the annual spring show.

The exhibition opening and awards presentation took place Friday, May 1. ONU award winners included Harry Melroy who earned honorable mention for “Rocket Head Explains It All,” an oil painting on canvas.

The judges for the show were Don Williams and Sue Harington-Williams of Findlay. They explained, “The diversity and competence was extraordinary for a group of work this size. Subject matter to media, size to color, [the exhibit] provided this community with a great opportunity to see good work.”

Describing the show, co-coordinator Marilyn Dillon said, “The exhibition has always been a great exponent of the variation offered by the Findlay area and the talent that thrives within it. This year, we are exhibiting some artists who have shown before and some first-year exhibitors. There are even students within the show—a fact that pays tribute to the quality of the art programs in our region.”

The Findlay Art League was organized in 1948 as an outgrowth of the adult education class in art sponsored by the Findlay Board of Education. It is the oldest continuing art organization in the area and is composed of both professional and amateur artists. The Findlay Art League’s purpose is to advance the knowledge of art in the community and give its members an opportunity to study, work and exhibit.

Admission to the exhibit is free, and open to the public, and runs through Saturday, May 30. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10a.m.–2p.m. The gallery is located at 117 W. Crawford Street in Findlay.

image: Rocket Head Explains It All by Harry Melroy, oil painting on canvas.

 

 

Best of 2009Ohio Northern Graduates Among “Best of 2009”
April
—Ohio Northern graduates Jaye Bumbaugh and Ed Corle have been selected for the Ohio Designer Craftsmen’s 26th annual juried members’ competition, “The Best of 2009.” Opening May 3 and continuing through June 21 at the Ohio Craft Museum, the exhibition features approximately 100 works in glass, metal, fiber, clay, wood and multimedia by nearly 90 artists.

This year’s juror, Wendy H. Outland, an independent curator, arts consultant, and president of Who Knows Art in Asheville, North Carolina, chose the work from over 325 entries.

“The greatest pleasure I get as a juror is seeing work by new artists for the first time, and this jury session did not disappoint,” Wendy commented. “It is an intriguing body of work that left me wanting to see more from these talented artist.”

Award winners will be announced and honored during the exhibition’s opening reception to be held May 3 at the Ohio Craft Museum from 1 to 4 p.m. The public is invited.

Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59) currently is a retired art professor from Bluffton University and past chair of the school’s art department. He received his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. His work will be featured in May at an exhibit during ONU’s Alumni Weekend in celebration of his class’ 50th reunion.

Ed Corle (BA ’78) is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He graduated from Ohio Northern University and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Founded in 1963, the Ohio Designer Craftsmen is a not-for-profit organization with over 2,100 members of craft artists, educators, students, and others who appreciate fine craft. Its mission is to promote the fine crafts aesthetic by establishing a standard of excellence, encouraging creative growth, providing professional support to craft artists, and building public awareness, appreciation and collection of fine craft. In support of this mission, Ohio Designer Craftsmen offers a wide range of exhibitions, publications, programs and artist services.

The Ohio Craft Museum is a program of Ohio Designer Craftsmen which presents five major exhibitions each year, as well as focus exhibits and a rotating display of the permanent collection. In addition, the museum houses the Craft Research Library and stages educational workshops and events for all ages and levels of experience. The Ohio Craft Museum is located at 1665 West Fifth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Parking and admission are free. Hours: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sunday, 1–4 p.m. Closed Saturday.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

images: Elf Owl Sleeping in Strange Box by Jaye Bumbaugh; Ash Flow by Ed Corle.

 

Ashley DallyONU Alumna Named to Defiance High School Athletic Hall of Fame
April
—Ashley Dally (BFA ’04) was selected for the 2009 class of the Defiance High School Athletic Hall of Fame.

Along with three other individuals, Ashley was chosen by the hall of fame committee. They will be officially inducted during the annual senior athlete/hall of fame banquet on May 9 at 6:30 p.m.

“These new hall of fame inductees are very deserving of this prestigious honor,” said athletic director Jerry Buti. “They are people who dedicated themselves to their endeavors and they have served as tremendous role models in many different ways.”

While at Defiance, Ashley lettered four years in track, three years in volleyball and three years in basketball. She was the District Player of the Year in volleyball in 1999, and two-time All-District and two-time Western Buckeye League (WBL) first team. She holds the school record for single season field goal percentage in basketball (58.4) in 2000.

She was the two-time WBL long jump champ and also recorded eight second place finishes at the WBL track meet. She was a six-time regional track meet qualifier.

She is a graduate of Ohio Northern University, where she was a four-year letter-winner in volleyball and indoor and outdoor track and field. She was an NCAA Division III provisional national qualifier in the heptathlon and a three-time All-Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC) performer in track. The ONU volleyball team won OAC titles all four years she was a member, advancing to the NCAA Elite Eight in 2003. She was named the top ONU female student athlete in 2004.

Ashley current lives in Arlington, Va., and plans to graduate next month with a master’s degree in museum studies from George Washington University. She currently works for Matt Mendelsohn Photography and interns for the Smithsonian Institution.

image: Ashley Dally at the Smithsonian Institution.

 

ArtSpace/LimaONU Alumni Accepted into Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima
April
—The Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima has quite the pedigree: 50 years of bringing the highest quality of artwork to Lima. And this year’s exhibit adds even more luster to its already shining reputation.

“This is all the best the region has to offer,” said Bill Sullivan, operations manager at ArtSpace. “When I look at it, I am very pleased with the work.”

Out of the 47 artists represented in the juried show, four have ties to Ohio Northern: Professor Linda Lehman, visiting assistant to the director of the Center for Teacher Education at ONU; Alumnus Jaye Bumbaugh; Alumnus Ed Corle; and Alumnus Harry Melroy.

And every year, it seems that ONU faculty or alumni earn awards in the show for their exemplary work. This year, again, was no exception.

Ohio Northern graduate Harry Melroy won the Second Award for one his acrylic paintings. He also won an honorable mention for another painting.

“These are superb, high-quality artists,” stated Sullivan. “And the work they’re displaying here is as good as we could ever want.”

Judging this year’s show were Judy Greavu and Bruce Chesser, both retired art professors at Ohio Northern University.

“This exhibit offers proof of a diverse visual art community within the 100 mile radius of Lima, Ohio,” explains Professors Greavu and Chesser. “Representational, abstract and non objective visual statements were included to adequately represent the range of work submitted. Formal control and compositional integrity needed to be demonstrated for work to be included in the exhibit. Works were then selected for unique viewpoints or extra intensity.”

Prof. Linda Lehman, a former public school classroom and art instructor, teaches art education at ONU. Two watercolor pieces by Linda were accepted into this year’s exhibit:
Burdens, watercolor
Sunlit, watercolor

While at Ohio Northern, Linda began an innovative Saturday Morning Arts (SMArts) program for ONU education students and children from surrounding school districts. This past October, Linda received a 20-year Circa Recognition Award by the Ohio Art Education Association and was inducted into the OAEA’s Circa Honor Society.

Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59), a retired art professor from Bluffton University and past chair of the school’s art department, received his bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University. His work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. His work will be featured in May at an exhibit during ONU’s Alumni Weekend in celebration of his class’ 50th reunion.

Jaye had three pieces accepted into the show:
Catwalk, silkscreen, ragboard, foamboard
Picasso Looking at His (Girl Before a Mirror, 1032), watercolor and plastic tape
Blue Owl, ceramic

Ed Corle (BA ’78) is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. His work accepted into ArtSpace included:
Drip, ceramic
Moon, ceramic

Ed has been with UF since 1986. Ed graduated from Ohio Northern University and earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s Area Artists’ Exhibition. In addition, he participated in numerous art fairs and festivals and is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and the Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

Harry MelroyHarry Melroy (BA ’71) earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree from Northern Illinois University. Harry’s award-winning work at ArtSpace included:
A Closer Look, acrylic (Second Award)
Cut the Cake, acrylic (Honorable Mention)
Barrel Plug, charcoal and pastel

Harry teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University. Harry’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa. He has won numerous awards for his work.

“This is one of the oldest programs we put on here,” explains Sullivan. “This art show was started by the Lima Art Association at least 50 years ago, originally as a show in the autumn. Over the years, it gained momentum and got the reputation of being one of the strongest shows we do all year. It draws all the good people entering, in part because of its pedigree.”

The Spring Show at ArtSpace/Lima is on view from April 17–June 30. Admission to the Ellen Nelson Gallery is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10a.m.–5p.m., Saturday, 10a.m.–2p.m. and closed Sunday and Monday. Please contact ArtSpace for additional information (419.222.1721).

ArtSpace/Lima is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing visual arts to the West Central Ohio region including. Its organization occupies a turn-of-the-century three-story brick building in the North West quadrant of Town Square in Downtown Lima, Ohio.

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, call 419.772.2160 or email art@onu.edu.

 

Laurie Godfrey printONU Alumna To Present MFA Show
April
—Laurie Godfrey (BFA ’05) will be exhibiting her final work during her Master’s of Fine Arts exhibit at the Bruce Gallery located at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania April 25–May 2.

Currently, Laurie is a MFA candidate studying printmaking at Edinboro University. Her current work examines digital c-prints, which are photographic documentations of her exploration with interconnection, systems and metamorphosis.

“It is through personal experiences that I feel events in life are not mere coincidences, but serendipitous in nature,” explains Laurie. “I believe we exist in a system of actions and reactions, interconnected by forces that are beyond our understanding. Through process, my work examines the directional forces that guide our existence, the relationship between internal and external influence, and the by-product of that exchange of energy.”

In explaining her process, Laurie states, “I set up experiments to explore the relationships between action and reaction. I use containers to simulate the structured environment of a petri dish for basic ingredients of vegetable oil and water, which represent an internal source of energy within a system. Through physical manipulation of these ingredients, I as the artist take on the role an external force and control. A cycle of dependent actions and reactions is established as I manipulate the fluids, and then wait for the unpredictable reaction. The use of light and food coloring makes this process visible as energy is exchanged. The photograph documents the serendipitous nature of this relationship.”

“In a present moment, the photograph records the events of the past, and implies those to follow,” Laurie continues. “The photograph is an encapsulation of my concept in a single moment, visually conveying the qualities of energy, interconnection, and metamorphosis. The fluid nature of my work expresses a feeling of kinetic energy. This sense of motion suggests the photograph is part of a larger world that exists beyond its boarders, evoking a sense of wonder and mystery. Sculptural forms of color, unique textures, and implied space lends itself to the photograph’s ability to change in perception. One can get lost in the environments that are created, interpreting them in a multitude of ways from microscopic slides of biological matter, to macrocosmic images of the cosmos.”

Laurie is a 2005 graduate of Ohio Northern. She earned her bachelor of fine arts in art/graphic design and minors in museum studies and web development. She is in her last year as a MFA student studying printmaking at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. In the Fall of 2008, she was invited to present in Costa Rica at the National University, the University of Costa Rica, and the National Printmaking Workshop.

While in graduate school, Laurie also worked for the Egress Press and Research (EPR), a fine art publishing and research component of the Printmaking Area of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania’s Art Department. Over the past five years, EPR has become an entity working to foster an environment of artistic/scholarly inquiry, through faculty and student direct interaction with artists involved in creative projects and art production. EPR promotes this artistic activity/inquiry through fine art printing and publication efforts and through our development of an ongoing series of visiting artist lectures, workshops, critiques and discussions on issues relevant to contemporary art and printmaking.

To see more of Laurie’s work, go to her Web site: www.lauriegodfrey.com.

 

Anne Rickard with classOhio Northern Alumna Passionate about “Making Time for Kids”
April
—Art can be a transformative experience and communicate important social issues in our communities. For a group of 12 and 13 year old kids, the impact of the visual arts may even save their lives.

About 50 middle school students in the Lake Placid Central School District have each created self-portraits that were later produced as three-by-five-foot banners. The giant paintings appeared on light poles along Main Street in Lake Placid, New York.

This banner project was the brainchild of Essex County Connecting Youth and Communities volunteer Naj Wikoff. ONU alumna Anne Rickard (BA ’82) and other volunteers helped put the project into motion.

“The youths’ portraits were hung above the busy streets of the village,” said Anne. Each banner included a different portrait on either side and included the message “Make Time for Kids,” a local campaign aimed for the community.

As a middle and high school art teacher, Anne strongly believes in the power of teaching art. As an educational tool, art is the ultimate discipline that can teach children to solve problems and to think creatively.

“Many of these banners were created in our school art classes,” explained Anne.

One of her students, Casey Porter, an eighth-grader, lifted the heavy banner bearing his own picture off the floor. His portrait marks a long, serious stare, eyebrows close-knit under a cap of bright-orange hair.

Casey wasn’t sure why he painted a blue face. “I don’t know,” he said with a mischievous look. Maggie Rose-McCandlish, another eighth-grader, painted a grid of colors around her head.

“The kids really liked their portraits,” stated Anne. “They think the banners were ‘Cool’ and were amazed about having their faces plastered all over Main Street.”

Pointing to the banners hung above the busting street, Anne was enlivened. “Creating self-portraits at the age of 12 and 13 can be difficult. So, to begin the students this year with a difficult project was asking a lot,” Anne said. “Middle schoolers are usually self-conscious to begin with.”

Under the colorful face of each portrait was a much larger, important message for the community.

“Our concern was, in Lake Placid, we have a below-average drug and alcohol use in elementary school and an above-average drug and alcohol use in high school. We’re trying to stop alcohol and drug use by youth,” explained Anne.

Studies show that the single most important difference in a young person’s life is made in time spent with a parent or family members—especially in the tough teenage years.

“In many ways, it’s amazing to see the tremendous variety in each portrait,” continued Anne. “Many people have noticed the banners. I hope our message will make a difference in our young peoples’ lives.”

Anne has taught art courses for the past 24 years in the Lake Placid school district. She teaches drawing, painting, advanced placement art drawing, studio in art and eighth grade art. This past year, she was honored by the New York State Art Teachers Association (NYSATA) as their 2008 “Art Teacher of the Year.” In 2007, Anne was honored as regional art teacher of the year and qualified for consideration as this year’s state teacher of the year honors.

Anne earned her bachelors degree from Ohio Northern University and then received her master’s degree from Plattsburgh State. Recently, she had an art educator’s fellowship with Maine College of Art in Portland to study drawing and painting. She’s also attended the School of Art Institute of Chicago and the Kansas City Art Institute.

Image: Middle School kids in Lake Placid make a bright montage with new banners for Lake Placid's Main Street. The non-profit group Connecting Youth with Community helped organize the Make Time for Kids project, delivering a strong message in street art. (Photo by Kim Smith Dedam)

 

Jaye BumbaughONU Alumni Weekend Celebrates the Work of Jaye Bumbaugh
April
—The work of Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59) will be on display Ohio Northern University’s Elzay Gallery of Art May 29–31. The exhibition honors Jaye and the class of ’59 as they celebrate their 50th class reunion. The show is free and open to the public from noon–6p.m.

A reception for Jaye and for the class of 1959 will be held from 5:15 until 6p.m. Friday, May 29 in the Elzay Gallery and lobby of the Wilson Art Center. Light refreshments will be served.

“I’ve always liked the challenge of working in a diversity of media, method, and scale,” expressed Jaye concerning his work. “I’ve always thought that there have been clear connections among even the most disparate of works. What has remained for me is the pleasure in the material qualities of paint, ink, wax, clay, linoleum, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, etc. I just want to make art. That is really all I have ever really wanted to do. I suppose critics and collectors want artists to be consistent. Realism and abstraction are interchangeable to me.”

Jaye continued, “Each time I create a piece of art I remember my childhood, my innocence, my source. Kurosawa said, ‘To create is to remember.’ Art has always reminded me of who I am when I make art. I’m not always sure if I’m trying to make sense. The whole idea of making art pushes me to some edge; sometimes I don’t know if I have enough answers to finish a piece. But then I think this is the ultimate challenge for the artist—the reward.”

Bumbaugh, a native of Lorain and now a resident of Lima, was a professor at Bluffton University for 37 years until 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University.

While at Bluffon, Jaye was instrumental in bringing the art department curriculum into the contemporary world, introducing new courses in airbrush, paper-making, figure drawing with the life model, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen and relief printmaking, welding and casting metals in sculpture.

Jaye’s work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. He currently is represented at the Marcia Evans Gallery in the Short North in Columbus, Ohio. In his work as an artist, Bumbaugh worked in many media including drawing in graphite, charcoal and pastel, painting in oils and watercolor, relief prints in linoleum, intaglio, silkscreen and lithography. In sculpture, he often has worked in ceramics and cast in bronze. More recently, he has worked with paper constructions in paper, foamboard, silkscreen and rag board.

For additional information at the exhibit, please contact the department of art & design or the alumni relations office.

image: Running Dog with Monkey; Firestorm; Monet

See photos from the exhibit and reception. Also, read another article which featured Jaye at ONU's Alumni Weekend.

 

WundermanThe Right Conversation Changes Everything
April
—Just like musicians calling it “having ears”—the ability to listen through noise to find soul—graphic designers fine the human truth in the clutter of information. So when BJ Zink (BFA ’02) started work for Wunderman (Chicago) in 2007, he understood that design creates powerful conversations between clients and customers.

“At Wunerman, those conversations often end with the production of award-winning creative work. But that’s because they always start with listening. Customers tell us what they want. We listen, respond, listen some more and adjust,” expresses BJ.

After graduating from Ohio Northern with a major in graphic design, BJ first worked for Core Group, a retail product and packaging design agency located in Elmhurst, Illinois. “As a junior designer,” reminisces BJ, “I created a lot of packaging design for new product development and many package redesigns for clients. I was even engaged in new design initiatives for corporate branding and identity product development, marketing communications, advertising and promotions. Budget guidelines and deadlines were always pushing me to stay on schedule.”

Two years later, BJ was hired as a lead designer for IMI Cornelius located in Glendale Heights, Illinois. “I got a chance to work alongside account and product managers to strategize, conceptualize and design product-specific materials for our clients, including promotional flyers, posters, direct mail and brochures. In some cases, we updated product merchandising for a fresh and a more appealing consumer and brand relevant appearance.”

While at IMI Cornelius, BJ was devoted a lot of personal time to learn Flash to benefit the firm. He created user-friendly and effective interactive presentations, sale tools and Web designs. He was aware how closely designers needed to work with internal and external customers to build strong creative relationships. Some of those relationships included clients such as PepsiCo., Coca-Cola, Starbucks, McDonalds, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, KFC, A&W Restaurants, and 7Eleven.

“We worked closely with a variety of US and global marketing teams to create and establish new brand and communications media design,” explains BJ. “We set the blueprint for brand guidelines. Corporate identity, internal and external collateral, catalog sheets, ads and presentation materials all needed to strategically correspond.”

“Even at Wunderman, I see myself as a goal-oriented designer,” concurs BJ. But it was his educational experience at ONU’s department of art & design that he gives special credit and thanks.

“My education at ONU opened my eyes and removed the blinders from my one-track mind. My professors introduced me to art and design methods that I had never been exposed to. Over the years, I became more engaged and encouraged to learn and achieve more. I didn’t want to leave [Ohio Northern].”

“The ONU design program integrates technology with its classes,” explains BJ, “but includes a strong focus on design thinking. That’s really important because my clients want results. I am responsible for streaming projects from concept through completion with a strategic intent. Our powerful conceptual skills and collaborative brain-storming are strengths of our firm.”

As a premier advertising agency specializing in print and interactive development, Wunderman translates “information into successful communication. We’ve even been known to call data sexy. So it’s not just ‘What are people saying in focus groups?’ It’s about listening to what people are saying and doing everywhere,” explains BJ. “Because after all, capabilities don’t matter. It’s what we do with those capabilities. As designers we use that knowledge to start conversations and continually evolve those conversations.”

 

Laura Barnhardt-CorleONU Graduate To Exhibit Recent Work in Findlay
April
—Watercolor work by Ohio Northern University alumna Laura Barnhardt-Corle is currently on display at The Wine Merchant, 540 S. Main St., Findlay, through the month of April. Laura is the second of many local artists who will exhibit work on a rotating basis at the downtown business. The artwork is available for purchase.

Business owner Dan Matheny said, “We are excited to be able to host this show of Laura’s. She is a talented artist and has a beautiful collection of work. I hope many people get the chance to see it.”

Laura is currently an adjunct instructor in art at Ohio Northern University where she teaches art appreciation. She has been with ONU since 2006. She earned her BFA degree from ONU in 1977 and is a free-lance artist in the Findlay area.

Laura’s paintings begin with an experience of connection to a place. She says, “The light and angles, breezes, temperature, humidity and even scents join forces with the site, revealing textures and details of rural Northwestern Ohio in my work.”

Depending on the size, Laura’s paintings often take a long period of time to complete—up to 90 hours. “Sometimes a camera becomes a necessity. Light constantly changes. Mosquitoes bit! And bumble bees cause havoc. Or other times the farmers worry that I am immortalizing their barn in too much of an untended state and they start fixing the gutters. So my camera becomes a tool in my creative processes.”

Laura has exhibited locally, regionally and nationally. Her work has been accepted in countless art shows. She also has participated in many art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Art Fair and the Black Swamp Arts Festival. She is a member of the Findlay Art League and has a studio in the Jones Building in Findlay.

image: watercolor, Doyle”s Barn Window

 

Kyle HotzOhio Northern Graduate Illustrates an “All-New Limited Series” To Debut this May
March
—The latest incarnation by graphic novel illustrator and Ohio Northern University alumnus Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93) will make its publishing debut in two months.

Dark Reign: The Hood, an all-new limited series beginning this May from writer Jeff Parker and artist—and Hood co-creator Kyle Hotz—will shine a light on the villain’s new place in the Marvel Universe.

For Kyle, who helped debut the character in the 2002 MAX limited series The Hood, his take on the character hasn’t changed much in the intervening years.

“I really have no inclination to draw the Hood himself differently. However, each story kind of makes me draw a little differently depending on the writer or the tone of the story or even which supporting characters are in it,” Kyle elaborates.

This new debut seems to start in a very good place at the beginning of the series.

“The writer places the Hood much higher up in the food chain than in previous series,” explains Kyle. “He doesn’t have to wait for trouble to find him. Starting it is the first thing he does every day.”

Kyle has worked as an illustrator and writer of comic books since 1991. His work has appeared in a series published by Marvel Comics (Periscope Studios), DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics. He has completed work on Marvel’s Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: The Osborn Journal, The Man-Thing and The Hood under Marvel’s MAX Comics imprint. Often referred to as the “master of macabre,” Kyle created Mosaic in 1999 under Sirius, his first written and illustrated graphic novel. Other horror titles Kyle has worked on include Ghost Ride, Zombie, Criminal Macabre and Evil Ernie. In 2007 at DC, his work won a Young Adult Library Services Association Award (Great Graphic Novels for Teens) for Bill the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities.

 

Woodspirites Herb SoapsScents and Stories: A Clean Spirit
March
—Barbara Kain Bobo’s thriving business has the sweet smell of success, but it’s also permeated with the scent of bergamot, lemon, cinnamon and almond. Her Woodsprites herb soaps are growing in popularity, and sales grossed more than a half million dollars in 1994.

The product, however, had a modest beginning. A 1971 ONU graduate in art, Barbara says she was part of the 1970’s “back to the simple life” movement. She and her husband, Alan, a 1968 ONU graduate in history, settled in the western Ohio countryside and started a family.

In 1975, with money she earned carving pull toys from wooden shipping crates for Christmas gifts, she bought some pots of herbs. In addition to selling herbs in a shop she set up in her home, she began to use them to flavor her cooking. A correspondence course in herbal medicine from Dominion Herbal College in Vancouver, British Columbia, taught her more about the healthful benefits of using herbs in other ways.

One afternoon in 1986, Barbara put a pot on her kitchen stove and experimented with soap making. Fascinated with the process and excited about the results, she put the soap on sale in her shop. She says that not everyone was as excited about the soap as she was.

Only when Barbara, with the help of a San Francisco herbalist, Jeanne Rose, took her soap to California and made some visits to the health food stores did the orders begin to increase. Barbara moved from her kitchen to a chicken coop back of the house, added an 80-gallon tank, recruited her husband and four children as helpers, and, with wooden molds made by her father, expanded her business.

Twice a week, Alan, a bank manager by profession, Barbara, Alex, 14, and Morgan, 17 put on safety goggles and protective aprons and gloves to mix the basic ingredients for the soap. Like a gourmet chef adding a dash of this and that, Barbara adds cinnamon, poppy seeds, oat bran, tapioca, or a new ingredient, and adds the natural dyes. The chicken coop begins to fill with a mixture of heavenly smells. After 24 hours, the soap is cut and hand-wrapped with recycled paper. The open ends of the package let the customer’s eyes and nose make the difficult choices.

The herb soap made by Woodsprites (the company name comes from Barbara’s first business venture, the wooden toys) comes in over 20 combinations. The soaps are given intriguing names like Zanzibar, Phome, Marco Polo, Portuguese Breakfast, Salad Bar, as well as familiar favorites, Lavender and Lemon Geranium. The soap is biodegradable, the ingredients are natural, and Barbara uses no animal fats.

Most soap makers remove the glycerin to make the bars harder. Barbara leaves it in so the rich lather softens the skin. She makes sure the mixture does not boil because that would destroy the vitamins and minerals. She wants her product to be like good food, bought and used when it’s fresh.

The entire family was once involved in the process, but Christopher (22) and Emily (20) are both at Ohio University and will soon be involved in their own interests. The family that’s left at home can produce 2,600 bars a week, but in 1991 when the orders increased, Barbara knew she had to expand so the soap could be made closer to the markets.

Two more soap makers have been added in Ohio, and several subcontractors in California. Adding to the family connection, her brother and his wife in Nebraska are now subcontractors, using ingredients and recipes Barbara supplies. Fritz Kain, who graduated from ONU in 1980, and Tama (Frey) who graduate in 1982, provide labor equipment, and space to fill orders Barbara receives at her home headquarters.

Nicola Clark, a young British friend, bought a U.K. Woodsprites franchise. She is entitled to use the name and logo and the recipes and business secrets Barbara has taught her.

The word is spreading. Feature articles on Barbara and her Woodsprites soap appeared in The Cincinnati Enquirer and The Dayton Daily News after an editor of Mademoiselle bought a bar of the soap and mentioned it in the magazine. Ohio Magazine ran an article in 1993, and Martha Stewart’s Living magazine, February 1995 issue, has a three-page story on the soap along with several photos of Barbara and her family making the soap. When Woodsprites went to California, movie actors Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell became enthusiastic users of the soap.

Although Barbara’s imagination, hard work, and ingenuity are at the center of the successful venture, it has also become a way to express two of the ideas on living she formed in college. Natural ingredients are best for people, and it’s a good thing for families to work together.

Underlying Barbara’s fascination with the herbal world is an understanding of the shrinking role agriculture plays in the world economy. She feels that “when we lose our farms, we lose part of our natural culture. By bringing agricultural products to the marketplace, we ensure the continuance of agriculture-based civilization.”

Barbara has always tested each new soap in her own tub before it goes on the market to make sure it meets her standards. As customers, covered with the soft lather from a Woodsprites bar, relax in a tub of warm water, they appreciate that. And the smell is wonderful.

images: When the soaps are removed from the handmade wooden molds, they are cut on another hand made tool, a soap loaf cutter. Finally, the soap is cut into bars and wrapped with labels.

 

Harry Melroy, Backyard AcademyOhio Northern Alumnus To Exhibit in Cleveland
March—Paintings by Ohio Northern alumnus Harry Melroy (BA ’71) will be on display at The Art Gallery on campus of Cleveland State University, located at 2307 Chester Ave., August 15–27, 2009. The gallery will be opened 10a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday from noon–4p.m. Mr. Melroy also will present a public lecture about his work on Friday, August 29 at 6p.m.

Melroy earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree from Northern Illinois University. He teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University.

Melroy’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa. He has won numerous awards for his work.

The Art Gallery is the exhibition space on the ground floor of the Art Building at Cleveland State. The exhibition space includes the main Art Gallery and two adjunct galleries: Gallery C and Gallery B. The gallery program features exhibitions of work by artists of national and international reputation and related educational programs including publications, lectures, and guided tours.

The Art Gallery is widely recognized as a major contributor to the cultural life in the region, with an annual attendance from Ohio, the United States, and abroad. The Art Gallery is funded by Cleveland State University with support from the Ohio Arts Council, philanthropic foundations, the Student General Fee, and the Friends of the Art Gallery. Contact the gallery for more information.

image: Backyard Academy

 

Ed CorleEd Corle To Exhibit Recent Work in Findlay
March
—Ceramic work by Ohio Northern University alumnus Ed Corle is currently on display at The Wine Merchant, 540 S. Main St., Findlay, through the month of March. Corle is the first of many local artists who will exhibit work on a rotating basis at the downtown business. The artwork is available for purchase.

“There are so many talented local artists in the Findlay area. We are excited to be able to showcase artists in our space,” said Dan Matheny, Wine Merchant owner.

Corle is currently an associate professor of art at The University of Findlay where he teaches ceramics, sculpture and three-dimensional design. He has been with UF since 1986. Corle attended Ohio Northern University and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1974. He earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree in 1982 from Rochester Institute of Technology School for the American Craftsmen.

He enjoys making and exhibiting functional hand thrown pottery. He has participated in countless art shows including the Toledo Art Museum’s area artists’ exhibition in 2008. In addition, he participates in area art fairs and festivals such as the Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair and The Black Swamp Arts Festival. He is a member of the Findlay Art League, The Michigan Guild and Ohio Designer Craftsmen.

image: Ed Corle's work from a recent exhibit held during Ohio Northern's Homecoming.

 


Laura Barnhardt CorleLooking Closely: the Art of Laura Barnhardt Corle
February 2009
—Owens Community College in Findlay, Ohio, will feature the work of Ohio Northern graduate Laura Barnhardt Corle.

The sense of having been there—remembering the smells and sounds, the brush of grass, the echo of a hoof in a barn—is alive in Laura’s painting and printmaking. The sites are familiar: fields of horses or livestock, barns, and empty houses of rural Ohio being reclaimed by nature through the passage of time. Spend the time needed to really see all of Laura’s brushstrokes and colors and you can practically feel the July sun on your back.

The exhibit will feature etchings and watercolor paintings. “Watercolor is my favorite medium because it doesn’t smell, it’s portable and can be contained,” says Laura. “Oil paint gets everywhere. Watercolor is simple to carry along, too. We simply need some paper, some paint brushes, perhaps a bucket for rinsing brushes and watercolor. I also enjoy etchings, wood cut and lino printing as well, but watercolor is what I really enjoy doing.”

A lot of Laura’s work is full of details. “I keep painting until I am done,” Laura states. “I suppose that I could do looser, faster watercolor paintings, but I am most comfortable with details. I really jump into a painting. I realize that I run the risk of pricing myself out of the art market, but I am really most comfortable with very detailed painting. The “Red Barn” took nearly 85 hours to paint. I know that I am extreme when I begin adding bugs and poison ivy. But it is my gift. It is a gift that I have worked hard to develop. Anyone with a gift that isn’t used, that is a crime.

"My most challenging piece of art is hanging at Blanchard Valley Hospital," says Laura. "It was challenging because it was the biggest watercolor I have ever done. It includes tiny details on a very big painting. I suppose I should use bigger brushes, but I like the jewel-like painting you get when you use small brushes. The painting that is hanging at the hospital is of a beautiful window of an old abandoned yellow house. It is 2 feet by 3 feet and it took a very long time. But I enjoyed the challenge. I 'm also grateful that my work is appreciated enough to be acquired by the hospital and is on display there."

The exhibit runs from February 23 through March 27 at the Campus Library Gallery. A reception and gallery talk is planned for March 2, 6p.m.

Image: “Farmhouse Window,” watercolor

 

Harry MelroyOhio Northern Graduate Earns Best of Show at “Art from a Different Perspective” Show
January 2009—The Findlay Art League’s “Art from a Different Perspective” show opened on January 23 at the Findlay Art League Gallery, 117 West Crawford Street. This new show opened the artists’ imagination to determine just what was meant by “from a different perspective.” The show runs through February 7. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10a.m. – 2p.m.

The show was judged by ONU graduate Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59), retired chairman and professor of art from Bluffton University. In a statement about the show, Mr. Bumbaugh commented, “I was struck by a lot of variety of ideas. The exhibit doesn’t lack coverage in terms of imagination! I could have awarded more awards!” and to the artists, “Keep making art — it’s worth the effort.”

Best of Show honors went to Harry Melroy, a 1971 graduate of Ohio Northern. Melroy also earned a master’s degree from Northern Illinois University. He teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University.

Melroy’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Mansfield Art Center. He also has work at Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

For more information about the Findlay Art League events and programs, stop by the gallery or visit their website.

Caption for photo: Harry Melroy is shown with his Best of Show painting “Glue Pot.” Harry’s painting and 70 other works of art by area artists can be seen at the Findlay Art League’s “Art from a Different Perspective” show.

 

How Things Fly exhibitONU Alumna soars as graphic designer
By Jack Palmer, Crescent-News
WASHINGTON, D.C.
— Ashley Dally (BFA ’04) knows something about flying through air.

A skilled high jumper in high school and college track and field, the 2000 Defiance High School alumnae currently serves as exhibit graphic design contractor at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

"I have to keep pinching myself, this is such an amazing opportunity," said Dally. "I am gaining practical knowledge and experience, while still using my creativity. Things could not have worked out better."

Dally began her tenure with the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in July as a graphic design intern, designing new graphic panels for the "How Things Fly" exhibit, the Smithsonian's most popular attraction.

"This is a very hands-on, interactive exhibit," said Dally. "Visitors learn how things fly. They explore the nature of gravity and air, how wings work, supersonic flight, aircraft and rocket propulsion, flying in space. The exhibit has been open since 1996, but it's updated constantly."

When the internship ended in October, Dally was immediately hired as an exhibit graphic design contractor for the exhibit.

"Right now I'm replacing the graphic panels about the principles of flight," she said. "That process should be completed by March. From March until May I'll be involved with directed research in 3-dimensional design."

Dally, who earned an undergraduate degree in graphic design and museum studies from Ohio Northern University in 2004, is a second-year graduate student at George Washington University. She is on schedule to earn a master of arts in museum studies (with concentration in exhibit design) next May. She also works part-time as a designer and production assistant at Matt Mendelsohn Photography in Arlington, Va.

"Working at a museum was always in the back of my mind," she said. "My undergraduate minor was in museum studies, and I just needed to realize that's what I wanted to do. George Washington is one of the best museum studies programs in the country."

After earning her undergraduate degree from ONU, she worked three years as a graphics designer at The Crescent-News and also served as exhibit designer and registrar for the Defiance city historian's office.

Through city historian Randy Buchman, Dally was introduced to the Andrew Tuttle collection. She personally inventoried and catalogued the mammoth 5,000-plus-piece collection, including over 3,000 coins. The Tuttle property also featured sculptures and artifacts from around the world, including American Indian artifacts, as well as a huge amount of stamps and several original documents from the late 1800s.

"I loved working on the Tuttle collection and I'm very thankful for the opportunity to gain experience on such a broad collection," she said. "There were so many interesting items and it provided a good base for me. I've even written some of my graduate school papers on what I did with that collection."

Dally moved to the Arlington area in 2007, and landed an interview for a graphic design position. Her interviewer commented that the projects in her portfolio from her time as a design major at Ohio Northern were more sophisticated and well thought out than the ones he saw at big art schools.

"I loved ONU and feel it definitely prepared me for my career," said Dally. "I'm still in contact with many of my professors and friends in the design department."

Dally is engaged to be married next September to former Tinora High School track coach Cory Hornish, who currently works as a tour guide at the new $621 million Capitol Visitors Center which opened to the public Dec. 2.

"My goal is to stay in the Washington, D.C. area," she stated. "I want to find a full-time job working at a museum or a firm that does exhibit design."

Read an additional story about Ashley's success at the Smithsonian Institute: Ashley Dally, BFA'04 learns "How Things Fly" in Washington, D.C.

image: from the Smithsonian Institute, ”How Things Fly Exhibit“

 

Anne RickardOhio Northern Graduate, Anne Rickard, honored as New York State’s Art Teacher of the Year
November 26, 2008, Lake Placid News

LAKE PLACID — Anne Rickard, Lake Placid Middle/High School (LPM/HS) art teacher, was honored last weekend by the New York State Art Teachers Association (NYSATA) as their 2008 “Art Teacher of the Year.” Rickard was honored at NYSATA’s state convention held Nov. 15-16 in Rochester, New York. Joining Rickard at the NYSATA event were her proud husband and daughter: Buzzy and Georgie Rickard. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Colton, were in attendance along with fellow LPM/HS art teacher Sandy Payne and LPM/HS principal Dr. Dave Messner.

Rickard has taught in the Lake Placid Central School District for the past 24 years. The Ohio Northern University graduate grew up in Carthage. She has been a fixture of the Lake Placid art community for the last two decades.

In her acceptance speech, Rickard talked about her honor when she said, “I am absolutely thrilled to be standing here.” About the power of teaching art, she commented, “Art provides the ultimate educational tools needed for problem solving and creative thinking in our children. Our students discover that seemingly ‘unsolvable problems’ DO have solutions. In the art room, students do not look to the back of their textbooks for the right answers. They realize that they have to DISCOVER the right answer through critical thinking and ‘hands on’ experience. As we move through the 21st century, it is the arts which will allow our children the clarity and ability to see the connections between others and ourselves.”

In 2007, Rickard was honored as regional art teacher of the year and qualified for consideration as this year’s state teacher of the year honors.

 

Professors Greavu and Chesser judging FALONU Alumni Place in the Findlay Art League’s 2008 Juried Show
November 2008
— The Findlay Art League’s 2008 Juried Show, held in conjunction with the Arts Partnership’s ArtWalk, opened to the public Friday, November 7 with an awards reception for the artists in the Findlay Art League gallery, 117 W. Crawford Street.

The show, opened to artists in the northwest Ohio area, was judged by Judith Greavu and Bruce Chesser, retired Ohio Northern University art professors.

ONU Alumnus Harry Melroy won second place for his acrylic painting, Cut the Cake. Ed Corle, an ONU alumnus and a university ceramic professor, won first place in the three-dimensional category for Rain.

The show ran from November 7 – 22, 2008. For more information about the Findlay Art League events and programs, stop by the gallery or visit their website.

image: Professors Greavu and Chesser finalizing the juried list at the Findlay Art League gallery.

 

Jaye BumbaughONU Alumnus Exhibits New Work
November 2008—
The work of Jaye Bumbaugh (BSED ’59) will be on display at The University of Findlay’s Lea Gallery, located in the Virginia B. Gardner Fine Arts Pavilion, Nov. 10 through Dec. 5. The exhibition is free and open to the public from 8a.m. to 8p.m.

An opening reception will be held from 2 until 4p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9, in the Virginia B. Gardner Fine Arts Pavilion. Light refreshments will be served.

Bumbaugh, a native of Lorain and now a resident of Lima, was a professor at Bluffton University for 37 years until 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master of fine arts degree in sculpture from Bowling Green State University.

While at Bluffon, Bumbaugh was instrumental in bringing the art department curriculum into the contemporary world, introducing new courses in airbrush, paper-making, figure drawing with the life model, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen and relief printmaking, welding and casting metals in sculpture.

Bumbaugh’s work has been accepted into many state and local juried art exhibitions where he won numerous awards. He currently is represented at the Marcia Evans Gallery in the Short North in Columbus, Ohio. In his work as an artist, Bumbaugh worked in many media including drawing in graphite, charcoal and pastel, painting in oils and watercolor, relief prints in linoleum, intaglio, silkscreen and lithography. In sculpture, he often has worked in ceramics and cast in bronze. More recently, he has worked with paper constructions in paper, foamboard, silkscreen and rag board.

For additional information at the exhibit, please contact Jeff Salisbury at jsalisbury@findlay.edu or 419-722-3691.

 

Laurie in Cost RicaONU Alumna Presents in Costa Rica
October 2008

San José, Costa Rica — Laurie Godfrey (BFA ’05) recently had the opportunity to share her knowledge of photolithography, her work as a graduate student as Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and her involvement with the Egress Press and Research with students, faculty and professionals in San José, Costa Rica.

Laurie was invited to Costa Rica by Priscilla Romera, a professor at the National University of Costa Rica. Laurie made several presentations to the National University, the University of Costa Rica, and the National Printmaking Workshop. Her presentations focused on the process of photolithography. This procedure resembles the conventional lithography used in printing and shares some fundamental principles with photography.

On October 8, students at the National University were involved with Laurie’s demonstrations and printmaking workshops that emphasized these experimental techniques. The following day, Laurie was invited by the National Printmaking Workshop of Costa Rica to present a roundtable discussion about her current work at Edinboro.

Laurie Godfey's print “Presenting at the National Printmaking Workshop was a little intimidating,” said Laurie. “It was a true challenge, an exercise in active learning, both culturally and scholarly. It certainly was an intellectual engagement that expanded well beyond the studio.”

During her last day, Laurie had a chance to visit The University of Costa Rica. She talked with students at the art school and was able to present her work and involvement with the Engress Press. According to Professor Romera, “Basically, these three workshops were the most important places in my country were printmaking has been promoted.”

Laurie is a 2005 graduate of Ohio Northern. She earned her bachelor of fine arts in art/graphic design and minors in museum studies and web development. She is in her last year as a MFA student studying printmaking at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. Her current work of gicleé prints investigates photographic documentations of her exploration with interconnection, systems and metamorphosis.

Laurie is also working for the Egress Press and Research (EPR), a fine art publishing and research component of the Printmaking Area of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania’s Art Department. Over the past five years, EPR has become an entity working to foster an environment of artistic/scholarly inquiry, through faculty and student direct interaction with artists involved in creative projects and art production. EPR promotes this artistic activity/inquiry through fine art printing and publication efforts and through our development of an ongoing series of visiting artist lectures, workshops, critiques and discussions on issues relevant to contemporary art and printmaking.

To see more of Laurie’s work, go to her Web site: www.lauriegodfrey.com.

 

Kyle Hotz, The Creepy Tree

Homecoming Exhibit Features ONU Graduate Kyle Hotz
October 17, 2008

Graphic novel illustrator Kyle Hotz (BFA ’93) of Bellbrook, Ohio is this year’s department of art & design’s Homecoming Exhibit and Lecture Series featured artist. The show highlights a number of panels from his recent novel, The Creepy Tree, which includes original, preliminary sketches to completed color comprehensives.

The lecture will begin at 3p.m. on Friday, October 17 in the Wilson Art Center. A reception will follow at 4p.m. at the Stambaugh Studio Theatre Gallery. The exhibition runs from October 17–31.

Kyle has worked as an illustrator and writer of comic books since 1991. His work has appeared in a series published by Marvel Comics (Periscope Studios), DC Comics, Image Comics and Dark Horse Comics. He has completed work on Marvel’s Incredible Hulk, Spider-Man: The Osborn Journal, The Man-Thing and The Hood under Marvel’s MAX Comics imprint. Often referred to as the “master of macabre,” Kyle created Mosaic in 1999 under Sirius, his first written and illustrated graphic novel. Other horror titles Kyle has worked on include Ghost Ride, Zombie, Criminal Macabre and Evil Ernie. In 2007 at DC, his work won a Young Adult Library Services Association Award (Great Graphic Novels for Teens) for Bill the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities.

Novelist and screenwriter Philip Nutman says of Kyle’s work, “Like the cinematographers of Hollywood’s golden age, Hotz knows how to paint with light and shade, creating a chiaroscuro world worthy of Caravaggio. Add to this his eye for twisted detail and an ability to make the everyday appear strange and/or menacing. Well, I don’t think either Bosch or Goya would be disappointed… Alongside Kelley Jones, [Kyle] is unquestionably one of the finest artists of the macabre working in comics today.”

Admission to the exhibit is free and open to the public, daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and before Freed Center events. For additional information about the University’s 2008-09 gallery season, contact the department of art & design 419.772.2160 or art@onu.edu.

See photographs from Kyle's talk and reception held on campus.

 

Fear of Valet ParkingONU Alumnus Harry Melroy To Exhibit Work in 1124 Gallery
Monday, October 6, 2008
Paintings by Ohio Northern alumnus Harry Melroy will be on display at The University of Findlay’s 1124 Gallery, located at 1124 N. Cory St., Oct. 6 through Dec. 12. The gallery is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Melroy earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree from Northern Illinois University. He teaches junior high school art at Mohawk Local School District in Sycamore, Ohio. He also taught art at The University of Findlay and at Tiffin University.

Melroy’s work recently was exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, the Toledo Museum of Art in the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition, the University of Minnesota/Morris and the Mansfield Art Center. He also has work at Projects Gallery in Philadelphia, Pa.

“It is from a blend of influences that I draw my scenes of surreal images and detached logic,” said Melroy in a written statement. “While I never consider what meaning the imagery may have, I’m certain there is a reason for all the subject selection. No artist, in any medium, works in a totally random fashion or simply pulls things out of nowhere.”

The 1124 Gallery opened for the first time in October 2005. Featured artists have included UF faculty, staff and alumni, as well as community artists. Exhibits such as paintings, weavings and photographs have been a few of the media displayed. For more information concerning the 1124 Gallery, contact Dr. Marie Louden-Hanes, dean of undergraduate education, at louden-hanes@findlay.edu or 419-434-4504.

 

 

Blue TorsoOhio Northern alumna accepted into juried show
Aug. 9, 2008

Laurie Godfrey (BFA graphic design ’05) had a digital C-print titled “Blue Torso” accepted for inclusion in the 2008 Hoyt Mid-Atlantic Juried Art Exhibition to be held at the Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Sept. 20–Oct. 31.

Laurie is currently entering her third year of graduate school at Edinboro University in Pennsylvania as a MFA candidate. She said, “The image is about 24 inches square. This is the last picture I took at the end of the semester. This is the first acceptance into a big juried show from my new body of work!”

The juror for the exhibition was Douglas Fogle, the curator of contemporary art at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh. He just recently curated the 2008 Carnegie International, which has received raved reviews.

About 148 artists submitted a total of 368 entries into the juried exhibit. The final show was narrowed down to 60 works.

To see more of Laurie’s work, go to her Web site: www.lauriegodfrey.com.

The Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts is a thriving regional arts center and museum, once home to the Hoyt family. The estate now houses more than 50 arts classes and workshops, 24 annual exhibits, annual cultural festivals, and school programs in two stately 1917 mansions on five acres of New Castle’s residential north hill. The Hoyt’s mission remains central to its synergy: to encourage an awareness, understanding, appreciation, and practice of the Arts & Humanities through visual, educational, and enrichment programming for all ages. For additional information, contact the Hoyt Institute: 124 E Leasure Ave, New Castle, Pennsylvania 16101, phone: 724.652.2882.

 

Ed Corle wins FAL showONU Alumni Win Best of Show and First Place at Findlay Art League
May, 2008

The Findlay Art League's May Show celebrating the League's 60th Anniversary opened Friday, May 2 at the FAL Gallery. In conjunction with the Arts Partnership's ArtWalk the May Show was a FAL member only juried show.

Mr. David Cayton, Professor Emeritus of Art at Bowling Green State University, was the judge for the show and stated that "...from the beautiful things here ...it was difficult and a challenge to select the most exciting."

Winning Best of Show was the "Red Vase" by Ed Corle, a 1978 graduate;
First Place went to Harry Melroy, a 1971 graduate, for a piece called "A Close Look."

Ohio Northern offers both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees with majors in advertising design, art education, graphic design and studio arts. The department of A&D holds memberships in national organizations such as the National Art Education Association, College Art Association, Foundations in Art: Theory and Education and the National Council on Education of Ceramic Arts. The department is recognized in the second edition of “Creative Colleges: A Guide for Student Actors, Artists, Dancers, Musicians and Writers” as one of the top 200 creative programs nationwide. For additional information about the department of art & design, contact the department at 419-772-2160.

 

Melissa Swabb teachingONU Art Education Alumna Finds Success
Melissa Swabb, BFA '02, is a high school art teacher in the Kenton Ridge school district in Springfield. Ohio. As a student, Melissa competed and won a national art scholarship from Kappa Pi, the international art honorary. She also played a key role on the women's soccer team and was involved in many department organizations and events.

As a graduate, Melissa has experience as a substitute teacher, including one year in the Marysville School District with a long term position in middle school art. Melissa also has taught at the Heartwood School of Art located in Milford Center, Ohio, under the direction of James Mellick. Prior to graduation, Melissa completed a summer sculpture apprenticeship with Jim Mellick. She also taught ceramics to grade school children at the Houston House of the Marysville Art League.

Her work has been seen in the Fine Arts Exhibit of the Ohio State Fair, the Wassenburg Art League and has recently completed a mural at the Stockyard Steakhouse and Saloon in Marysville.

Department of Art & Design

Ann Hood

419-772-2160
b-hood@onu.edu
Wilson Art Building
525 South Main Street
Ada, Ohio 45810
Monday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed